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Marco Alban-Hidalgo

MONTHLY DONOR

Marco's Story

Marco joined Watsi on July 23rd, 2016. Four years ago, Marco joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Marco's most recent donation supported Paulo, a joyful 7-year-old boy from Kenya, to fund a fracture repair procedure on his left leg.

Impact

Marco has funded healthcare for 74 patients in 10 countries.

All patients funded by Marco

Aiden

Aiden is a four-year-old boy from Kenya. He is a playful kindergartener who hails from Kanam Keener Village in Turkana County. On November 13th, Aiden sustained a severe injury to his right upper limb after he fell on a hard ground while playing with his friends. His aunt brought him to the hospital after she heard his cries outside. Aiden was reviewed by our partner doctors, who conducted an X-Ray revealing a fracture to his right supracondylar or upper arm bone. Because he was in pain and could not move his hand, doctors applied skin traction to stabilize his fracture and realign the normal position of the bone. Aiden will need an Open Reduction and External Fixation (OREF) procedure to fully treat his injury. Unfortunately, this procedure is costly for Aiden and his family. Aiden is the second born child in a family of three. His mother is a single mother who earns wages from laundry labor. Because she lacks a stable job, she is struggling financially, exacerbated especially by the COVID pandemic. She decided to take Aiden to stay with his aunt because it was difficult for her to support three children by herself. Aiden and his family are appealing for financial help. On November 16th, Aiden will undergo an OREF procedure at our medical partner's care center, which will cost $801. Once recovered, he will be able to move his hand again and carry out daily life activities as normal. Aiden's mother shared, “He has so much pain. I hope he gets treated and feels better and will be well again”.

100% funded

$801raised
Fully funded
Mo

Mo is a 22-year-old student from Thailand. He lives along with his father in a refugee camp on the Thai-Burma border. While living in the camp, Mo finished high school and is now completing post-high school education. Their household receives 480 baht (approx. $16 USD) each month as part of their food support from an organization called The Border Consortium. However, this amount is not enough to cover their daily needs. Therefore, Mo's father works as a seasonal agricultural day laborer in a nearby village. He is able to earn an extra 350 baht (approx. $12 USD) in a month but this amount is still not enough and they shared that they struggle to make ends meet despite having free basic health care and education in the camp. In early September, Mo started to feel dizzy frequently, especially whenever he stood up. At first, he thought he would feel better after he rested and slept. However, he was unable to sleep well for about a week and was suffering from insomnia. After a medic examined him he was referred to the local hospital for treatment. The doctor at the local hospital referred him to Chiang Mai Hospital (CMH) to see a neurologist. After he returned to the camp, Mo rapidly started to lose his vision in both of his eyes. An NGO called Malteser International Thailand (MI) was able to arrange Moses’ travel documents, he was brought to CMH on October 5th, 2020. The next day, he received a CT scan which showed that he has a mass in his brain and a build-up of cerebrospinal fluid in his brain due to the mass. Because of the severity of his condition, the doctor scheduled him to receive surgery right away on October 9th. The mass will be removed and sent for biopsy. He will also undergo a procedure to receive a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt to drain the excess fluid from his brain. Currently, Mo has a headache, and he is not able to move his eyes from side to side. He needs his father to accompany him wherever he goes because he can no longer see far. He spends most of his time lying down in bed and needs to be pushed in a wheelchair to get around due to his new vision problems. Mo sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund. He is now scheduled to undergo a brain mass removal surgery on October 9th. He is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. “Life suddenly become darker without me knowing why," said Mo. "It is extremely difficult for me to even go to the toilet [by myself]. I cry while I lay in bed for many hours. I really miss seeing colors."

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Johnson

Johnson is an 8-month baby boy from Tanzania. Johnson, the last born child in a family of four, and already is a very active and friendly little boy. Johnson's parents are both subsistence farmers. Johnson was born in a local hospital where his parents were informed that his spine was not fully formed, thus resulting in a condition known as spinal bifida. Because Johnson's condition was not severe, they were informed that he wouldn’t need treatment and that it would close on its own. As their family continued to attend clinics they were told to wait till Johnson gets to five months old for him to have any kind of treatment. At five months they took him to hospital for the treatment but the cost was too high for them to afford and they had to return home. As time went by, Johnson's mother saw that his condition could end up complicated if he didn’t get treatment soon and end up greatly affecting Johnson later in life. She decided to seek treatment. She went to Mt Meru and was referred to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center ALMC for more help.  Johnson was born with spina bifida, a type of neural tube defect in which the spine does not properly close around the spinal cord. Without treatment, Johnson is at risk of lower-limb paralysis, infection of the exposed nervous tissue, development of tethered cord syndrome, and possible developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,015 to cover the cost of Johnson's spina bifida closure surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on September 7th. This procedure will hopefully spare Johnson from the risks associated with his condition, instead allowing him to grow and develop along a healthy trajectory. Johnson’s mother says, “We are concerned if our son does not get his spine corrected, it might affect his ability to walk. Please help my son.”

100% funded

$1,015raised
Fully funded
Rin

Rin is a 49-year-old rice farmer from Cambodia. He and his wife have been married for 20 years, and have two children together. His wife works in a factory, and his children are all in school. He works long hours, and raises chickens for additional income. He enjoys cooking for his family in his free time. Rin had a work accident and has an open fracture on left forearm. He went to a local hospital for an open reduction internal fixation and skin graft, but the surgery did not help him feel better. He has now come to Watsi's Medical Partner CSC because the fracture is still impacting him in a challenging way. He cannot use his fingers and has pain when he tries to work with this hand. One year ago, he was dragged under a vehicle and fractured his left forearm. He went to a local hospital and was operated on, but the fracture did not heal properly. He still experiences chronic pain from his injury, and he cannot move his hand. His family has lost their primary source of income since he cannot work, and he is worried about being able to support them. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre, can help. On June 3rd, Rin will undergo a fracture repair procedure, which will cost $465. After the surgery, he will be able move his wrist and hand, and return to work. Rin said, "I am proud of my work and I want to work so I can support my family. My hand is in pain all the time, but I really hope that this surgery is enough for me to keep working."

100% funded

$465raised
Fully funded
Htay

Htay is a 45-year-old woman who lives with her husband and three daughters in Thae Phyu Village in Burma. Htay and her husband run a small shop selling betel nut and general groceries beside their home, however she has been unable to work due to her heart condition for the past year. Htay’s oldest daughter used to work at a factory in Yangon, but moved back home last year when Htay became too ill to wok. She now helps out at Htay’s shop while also helping with household chores. Htay’s other two daughters are students; one is in grade 10 and the other is in grade four. After she gave birth to her last daughter, Htay began to experience frequent pain in her chest and headaches. Whenever she would lay down, she also felt like she could not breathe well. She then went to Htantabin General Hospital in Yangon where she received an electrocardiogram (ecg). Later, the doctor told her that she has arthritis and Ischemic heart disease, a condition where an organ does not receive enough blood and oxygen. She was given medication and returned home. Htay said, “This medication seemed to help my condition and I continued to buy it from the pharmacy.” In February 2020, Htay’s condition deteriorated again; she felt like she could not breathe and that she was exhausted all the time. Htay and her husband went to Thiri Sandar Hospital in Yangon where she received x-rays and an echo. After checking her results, the doctor told her that she has a large hole in her heart and that she would need to have it closed surgically. Currently, Htay has difficulty breathing, mostly at night, and she feels tired especially when she uses the upstairs. She also has a rapid heartbeat. Htay told us, “I am worried about my condition and I am very sad whenever I think about it. But now I am happy to have found someone to help support my treatment. Once I have fully recovered, I will build a new shop [made of bamboo] because my old shop is starting to fall apart. I will also go back to working with my husband and I will support my children so that they can become educated people.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Jimmy

Jimmy is the first born of two children and lives in Makadara rehabilitation center. Jimmy was brought to Watsi's Partner CURE Hospital by Elijah, a social worker at Makadara Rehab Center. The rehab center supports street children and their families. They rescue, rehabilitate, and cater for the basic needs and facilitate placement either in regular schools or special schools or rehabilitation homes. Jimmy was a street child and was rescued in January 2018. He had fled home in Kayole, Soweto slum where his single mother lives in a difficult state. Fortunately, he was rescued and enrolled in school. He recently finished his class 8 final exam and scored good grades that will enable him to join a national high school. Jimmy joined the street family in 2016. He fell in 2017 and injured his elbow so that to this day he cannot stretch out. He has lived like that since then and complains of pain and discomfort. Jimmy is afraid that his education might be affected and his aspiration of becoming an engineer might come to an end. Jimmy is scheduled to undergo right elbow interposition arthroplasty to realign the bones so that he can be able to stretch his hand and use it fully. On behalf of the Makadara Rehab Center, Elijah, a social worker requested for support because they have so many children who need different care and attention and they cannot meet the cost of this treatment. “I request for support to undergo surgery so that I can play basketball and even do other things like washing and writing which I am currently not able to,” Jimmy told us.

100% funded

$1,165raised
Fully funded
Mya Mya

Mya Mya is a 40-year-old-woman who lives and work with her elder sister for a herbal medicine production workshop in Sanchaung Township, Yangon Division in Burma. They are originally from Bago Division and moved a few years ago. Since Mya Mya was 18 years old she has felt bronchial asthma and suffered from difficulty breathing. Sometimes she feels severely tired. She went to a health worker at her village and the health worker told her to go and see heart specialist in Yangon. However, at that time she did not have money to go to Yangon, so she did not go. She has only used herbal medicine for treating difficulty breathing since she was 18-year-old, which did help her feel better. For the last four months at night she has severe difficulty breathing, so she woke her sister up and asked her sister to send her to a private clinic called Yaung Chi Oo in Yangon. After the doctor's examination, she was told her that she needs to go and see heart specialist doctor. Then the doctor gave her an injection and some oral medication. Then, she went to Thiri Sandar Private Hospital on January 31, 2020 where she received an echocardiogram. The doctor told her that she has heart disease and she needs surgery. On February 5, Mya Mya went to Kan Thar Yar Hospital (KTYH) as suggested by the doctor at Thiri Sandar Hospital. The doctor at KTYH performed another echo before diagnosing her with large ventricular septal defect (VSD). The doctor at KTYH also told her that she needs surgery. Unfortunately, Mya Mya and her family cannot afford to pay for the surgery. After talking to the nurses and doctor about her problem, the nurses who know Watsi Partner Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) refered her to BCMF. Mya May needs to stop working because of her tiredness. She is worried about her parents because if she cannot work. She shared, "If I recover from my disease, I need to work for my parents, to support them.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded