Taylor BrownMONTHLY DONOR
Taylor's Story

Taylor joined Watsi on December 31st, 2013. Eight years ago, Taylor joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Taylor's most recent donation traveled 8,500 miles to support Annastasia, a small businesswoman from Kenya, to fund a mastectomy to heal her breast cancer.

Impact

Taylor has funded healthcare for 89 patients in 14 countries.

All patients funded by Taylor

Annastasia is a very joyful lady. The 47-year-old is married and has five children. Two of her children have already finished school and are not yet financially stable. Her husband does not have a job but is sometimes able to get work as a bus driver when they need more help. Annastasia used to sell charcoal but she stopped the business three months ago when she fell ill and started her treatment process. In September of this year, she noticed a mass in her right breast. Three days later, she went to a facility near her home area, was examined, and told that she had mastitis. She was immediately admitted, put on medication and a few days later, she was discharged. While at home, she noticed that the swelling was getting bigger. She went back to the facility, was examined again, and referred to another nearby facility. In the facility scans and test were done and she was immediately referred to Kijabe Hospital for treatment. Upon arrival at Kijabe hospital, Annastasia was scheduled for urgent surgery. However, she is not in a financial position to cater for the surgery and is appealing for financial aid. Annastasia has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Without treatment, the cancer may spread to other organs. A mastectomy, a surgery to remove breast tissue, has been advised to rid her body of breast cancer and to prevent the cancer from metastasizing. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1110 to cover the cost of a mastectomy for Annastasia. The procedure is scheduled to take place on December 30th. After treatment, Annastasia will hopefully return to a cancer-free life. Annastasia says, "When I was told that the mass could be cancerous if not removed, I felt helpless and knew that it was over for me.”

75%funded
$833raised
$277to go

Jayden is an active, curious 9-month-old baby. He is the only child in his family. His father is a laborer in a construction site, but work is hard to come by due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2019, his mother found a job as teacher in a private school but also lost her job as a consequence of the pandemic. The family currently lives in a rented house on the outskirts of Nairobi. When Jayden was born, his mother noticed that he was not passing urine properly. Before they were discharged home from the hospital, she shared her concern with the doctor who assured her that it was only a temporary condition. Despite the assurance from the doctor, she still had her own doubts. Five months later, there was no improvements in how Jayden was passing urine. So she took him to a local facility for examination and the doctor diagnosed him with hypospadias, or urinary dysfunction, and Jayden was referred to our medical partner's care center, BethanyKids Hospital, for treatment. Upon arrival, he was examined again and the doctor scheduled him for a hypospadias repair surgery. Jayden's parents have National Health Insurance (NHIF), but their request for coverage was rejected. The hospital's social worker then referred their family to Watsi to get help for his treatment. Jayden is now scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on June 28th to address his uncomfortable symptoms and possible future complications. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $735 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. Jayden’s mother shares her concern, “It was a hard time for us when NHIF rejected our request. We had started to learn to live with the fact that Jayden may stay for a long time before he could be treated as we are not financially stable.”

$735raised
Fully funded

Eh is a 16-year-old boy who lives with his parents and cousin in the refugee camp in Mae Hong Son Province in Thailand. His family receives 1,180 baht (approx. 39 USD) every month on a food card from the organization The Border Consortium. This amount is not enough to cover their daily needs despite receiving free basic health care and education in the camp. To help make ends meet, Eh’s father works as a security guard in the camp too, earning 800 baht (approx. 27 USD) in a month. In addition to this, Eh’s mother and cousin work as day labourers whenever they find work. Eh also works with them during his summer vacations. In May, Eh climbed up a ladder to lay down and rest in a bamboo hut on stilts. While trying to sit down, one of the bamboo sticks rolled out from under him and Eh fell through the floor of the hut. Putting out his left arm subconsciously to break his fall, Eh ended up landing on that arm. Currently, Eh's arm is in a sling and he is taking pain medication to control the pain. If he moves his left arm or tries to lift his arm, he feels a lot of pain. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Eh will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for May 28th and will cost $1,500. This procedure will help Eh be able to use his arm again and he will no longer be in pain after surgery. Eh shared, “I want to become a literature teacher as it is my favorite subject. After surgery, I hope that I can go back to school with my arm healed."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Naw Kwee Moo is a 54-year-old woman from the Karen region in Burma, who lives with her husband and their family in a refugee camp. Of her children, three daughters and three sons still live in the refugee camp along with them near the Thai-Burma border. Naw Kwee is a homemaker and her husband is currently too ill to work. Five of their children go to school in the camp, four other children have moved away, and her second oldest son graduated from a post-secondary program in May 2020. He worked as an agricultural day laborer at a nearby Thai village until mid-December 2020. Due to Covid-19 travel restrictions, he was no longer allowed to leave the camp. Naw Kwe’s household receives a monthly cash card to purchase basic rations. Although they receive free education and basic health care in the camp, they shared how hard it is to make ends meet. Starting four years ago, Naw Kwee often went to the camp’s hospital run by Malteser International (MI) Thailand to receive treatment for urinary tract infections (UTI). Most of the time, she would feel better after taking medication, but she was no longer able to work as an agricultural day laborer because of her pain. Over the next few years, she was diagnosed with chronic UTI. “I think my condition was caused from consuming dirty water,” she said. “When I worked as a day laborer, we had no access to clean water.” Naw Kwee received antibiotics through an intravenous (IV) line at the camp’s hospital. When her condition did not improve, a doctor at the camp’s hospital referred her again to Mae Sariang Hospital in March 2020. There she received a urine test and an x-ray of her kidneys, ureters and bladder. She was finally diagnosed with a right kidney stone. After multiple visits, the doctor at Mae Sariang Hospital referred her to Chiang Mai Hospital (CMH) for further treatment. However, Naw Kwee could not travel to CMH for a while due to travel restrictions after the outbreak of Covid-19. Finally, last June medical staff from her camp were able to bring Naw Kwee to Chiang Mai. During her appointment, the doctor scheduled her to undergo an intravenous pyelogram on July 16th, 2020. After she received a diagnostic test, she returned to CMH for her follow-up appointment on November 19th, 2020. During her appointment, she received more tests and it was at her next appointment Naw Kwee was told she needed to undergo multiple rounds of laser treatment to break up the stone in her kidney. She received her first round of laser treatment on February 11th, 2021. Two days later, she developed a fever and could only pass a bit of urine. She also started to experience severe back pain and other troubling symptoms. MI staff took her back to the hospital where she received an ultrasound. The nurse shared with her that after her laser treatment, the stones had broken up and many of them where now stuck in her ureter, creating a blockage. She now needs emergency surgery to remove the stones. Our Medical Partner Burma Children Medical Fund is seeking $1,500 to support her surgery and finally relieve her of her painful condition.

$1,500raised
Fully funded