Meet another patient

Watsi logo blueWatsi

Success! Naw En from Burma raised $1,328 to fund a safe c-section delivery for her baby.

Naw En
100%
  • $1,328 raised, $0 to go
$1,328
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Naw En's treatment was fully funded on August 22, 2022.

Photo of Naw En post-operation

September 6, 2022

Naw En underwent a safe c-section delivery for her baby girl.

Naw En, who’s a healthcare worker in her village in Burma, had a successful c-section and is home caring for her new daughter and two older sons! Both Naw En and her daughter are healthy and doing well.

“My wish is come true and now I have a baby girl,” Naw En said.

Soon, she hopes to go back to work caring for others in her community. And she thanked all of their donors who kept her from having to go into debt to fund the procedure she needed to safely deliver.

“I have nothing in return, and I have no more words to appreciate your kindness and support more than saying thank you. Your support means a lot to me,” Naw En said.

“May everyone who helped me be blessed more and may your life full of happiness as you bring happiness to others.”

Naw En, who's a healthcare worker in her village in Burma, had a successful c-section and is home caring for her new daughter and two older ...

Read more
April 6, 2022

Naw En is a 31-year-old woman who lives with her husband, two sons and parents in a village in Karen State near the border of Burma and Thailand. Her husband and parents are subsistence farmers. Naw En is a village health worker, and her two sons are primary school students in the village. Although she earns around 100,000 kyat (approx. 100 USD) per month to support her family, she does whatever she can to only charge the villagers she treats for medications provided. Those who cannot afford to pay for the cost of medications are provided medication free of charge. Her family also raises chickens and pigs for their family to eat. The income Naw En earns is just enough to cover their daily expenses, but they have to borrow money to pay for anything else, like basic health care.

Naw En learned she was pregnant last August 2021. She went to register her pregnancy at nearby Hlaingbwe Hospital, but the doctor told her to go to Hpa-An General Hospital when she told them that she had high blood pressure and previously needed a c-section delivery. When she went to Hpa-An General Hospital, a nurse told her to go to Taw Win Thu Ka Hospital because they were understaffed due to the coup and humanitarian crisis in their area. Finally, she then registered her pregnancy at Taw Win Thu Ka Hospital last November and received an ultrasound, blood test and urine test. The doctor gave her monthly follow-up appointments to check her high blood pressure and to check that her baby is in the right position.

In January, Naw En learned that she will have a girl. “I was very happy to hear this as I already have two sons,” she said. Her doctor has now told her that she will need another c-section to ensure a safe delivery and unable to come up with the money needed, Naw En called her friend who works in Mae Sot to ask for help. Her friend told her about our medical partner Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) and that she may be able to find assistance in accessing her treatment.

Currently, Naw En is taking medication for high blood pressure and feels tired when she walks. She can feel her baby kicking. When her blood pressure is high, she feels dizzy. She feels stressed each time she has to travel to the hospital, as it is located four hours from her home and cost 60,000 kyat (approx. 60 USD) just for the round-trip transportation. She is also worried about the cost of her c-section and that they would have to borrow money if they cannot find donors.

In the future, she will continue to work as a village health worker. In her free times, she loves to spend time with her two sons and play with them.

Naw En said, “I was happy when BCMF staff told me that donors will help pay for my c-section. Thank you so much to the donors for reliving me of my worries.” She also added, “I am very happy and excited to have a baby girl!”

Naw En is a 31-year-old woman who lives with her husband, two sons and parents in a village in Karen State near the border of Burma and Thai...

Read more

Naw En's Timeline

  • April 6, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Naw En was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • April 7, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Naw En received treatment at Taw Win Thu Kha Hospital in Burma. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • April 11, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Naw En's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • August 22, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Naw En's treatment was fully funded.

  • September 6, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Naw En's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 33 donors

Treatment
Caesarean section (C-section)
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,328 for Naw En's treatment
Hospital Fees
$572
Medical Staff
$447
Medication
$3
Supplies
$209
Labs
$88
Radiology
$9
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The symptoms of complications during labour can include labour lasting longer then 20 hours for first time mothers or 14 hours for mothers who have given birth in the past, excessive bleeding, pregnancy-related high blood pressure, lack of oxygen supply to the baby during labour or the baby being in a breech position.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Some pregnant women will fall unconscious during labour due to the pain and/or excessive bleeding. Where an emergency C-section needs to be performed, both mother and baby can have loss of life if the C-section is not performed quickly enough.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

In villages and remote areas of Burma, where there are no clinics or hospital nearby, most women do not have the opportunity to receive prenatal care. They do not know whether the baby is in the right position and they do not know if they have high blood pressure or any underlying health condition that could affect their pregnancy and labour. They usually depend on traditional birth attendants, who often do not have any formal medical training. If there are complications during labour, many women and babies risk death because they cannot access treatment at a hospital or clinic fast enough.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The physician will clean the abdomen of the mother. A tube (catheter) will likely be placed into the bladder to collect urine in a urine bag. An intravenous (IV) line will be placed in a vein in the mother's hand or arm to provide fluids and medication. Most cesarean sections are done under regional anesthesia, which numbs only the lower part of the body, allowing the mother to remain conscious during the procedure. Common choices include a spinal block and an epidural block. During an emergency C-section, general anesthesia is sometimes used, which means that the mother will not be awake to have skin-to-skin contact with the baby right after the birth. If both the mother and baby are healthy after delivery, they will need to stay at the hospital for 2-3 days. In some cases, if there are complications after the procedure, the mother will have to stay at the hospital for 7-10 days.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In most cases, without a C-section the mother and/or baby are at risk of loss of life. Undergoing a C-section therefore will usually save the mother and/or baby's lives.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Risk to the mother's health include infection inside the womb or at the opening site, postpartum hemorrhage or during the procedure, blood clots, splitting stitches, injury to the organs and/or blood vessels, reaction to anesthesia and the possible inability to deliver vaginally in the future. Risks to the baby include accidental injury during the C-section and temporary breathing problems after the birth.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

C-sections are performed in most city level hospitals in Burma and it is very expensive and women who lives in the remote area, cannot afford to pay for it.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There is no alternative to an emergency C-section without risking mother and baby's lives. However, it is still common practice to give birth at home with a traditional birth attendant amongst the communities in the village in Burma. During a home birth, a woman will first try to give birth vaginally. If there are complications, the woman will be rushed to a hospital or clinic for an emergency C-section.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.