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Success! Stanley from Kenya raised $542 to fund testicular surgery.

Stanley
100%
  • $542 raised, $0 to go
$542
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Stanley's treatment was fully funded on October 24, 2019.

Photo of Stanley post-operation

September 29, 2019

Stanley underwent testicular surgery.

Stanley had successful surgery to descend his testis. The surgery has greatly minimized the risk of suffering testicular torsion, infertility and testicular cancer.

“I will that God will bless you as you have blessed me,” says Stanley.

Stanley had successful surgery to descend his testis. The surgery has greatly minimized the risk of suffering testicular torsion, infertilit...

Read more
August 23, 2019

Stanley is a child from Kenya. He is a bright composed boy. Stanley, the seventh of seven children, is in pre-school and doing well in his studies. Stanley’s parents are subsistence farmers without an external source of income. They have other children to tend to who are in school with the firstborn in the fourth year in high school.

Stanley was diagnosed with cryptorchidism, a condition in which one or both of the testicles remains undescended. If left untreated, Stanley has an increased risk of developing hernias, testicular cancer, and fertility problems in the future.

Stanley will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on August 26th. AMHF is requesting $542 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care.

“I want to be a policeman when I grow up,” says Stanley.

Stanley is a child from Kenya. He is a bright composed boy. Stanley, the seventh of seven children, is in pre-school and doing well in his s...

Read more

Stanley's Timeline

  • August 23, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Stanley was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare.

  • August 26, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Stanley received treatment at BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital (BKKH) in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 29, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Stanley's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • September 29, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Stanley's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • October 24, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Stanley's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 14 donors

Funded by 14 donors

Treatment
Orchidopexy (Double)
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $542 for Stanley's treatment
Hospital Fees
$536
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$2
Supplies
$0
Labs
$4
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Normally, before a baby boy is born, the testicles move into the scrotum (the sac that holds the testicles). Sometimes, one or both testicles stay in the body cavity instead of moving into the scrotum. This is called undescended testicles or cryptorchidism. An orchidopexy is an operation to lower the testicles into the scrotum. A patient may need to have this operation on one or both testicles.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Ideally, the surgery should be performed before a child reaches two years old. Left untreated, this condition can lead to infertility. The higher temperature inside the body can affect sperm production. Men with both testicles affected are more likely to experience fertility-related issues than men with only one affected testicle. This condition can also cause inguinal hernia, in which the intestine protrudes through a weakened area in the abdominal wall. Only surgery can correct this condition, which can otherwise result in intestinal damage or death. Finally, this condition is a risk factor for testicular cancer. If surgery is performed early, this risk is limited.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Undescended testis is the most common birth anomaly in boys. This condition is present in about 1-4.5% of newborns, with a higher incidence in premature babies (30-45%). Unilateral undescended testis is four times more likely than bilateral.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After surgery, the patient will stay in the hospital for an average of three days. The patient is continually monitored.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Treatment will reduce the risk of infertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This condition is very treatable, and the procedure is low-risk.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality care centers in the region. Hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat this condition.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

An alternative to surgery is to use synthetic hormones that encourage the testicle to move into the scrotum. Hormone therapy is only recommended if the child’s testicle(s) are close to the scrotum. However, hormone therapy is not commonly available in Kenya. According to the guidelines published by the American Urological Association in May 2014, orchidopexy is the most successful therapy to relocate the testis into the scrotum. Hormone therapy is not recommended.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Stuwart

Stuwart is a 5-year-old boy and the only child in his family. He's a playful and friendly boy who is currently having a hard time walking due to his legs bending outwards. Stuwart is still in class one and he loves counting numbers and drawing. His father works as a bodaboda driver to be able to support and care for his family. His income is not much but helps them make ends meet. Early this year, Stuwart started having pain in his knees when he woke up and tried to stand. This went on for a few weeks and when his parents saw how much he was suffering they decided to seek treatment for him at a local hospital. Stuwart was diagnosed with bilateral genu varus (knock knees). His parents were informed that Stuwart will need to have surgery to correct both of his legs and prevent them from becoming further deformed and causing Stuwart pain. At that time, he was supported by Watsi last July to undergo surgery. He has now developed a genu valgus where his legs are now bowing outwards. To help stop this, Stuwart needs another surgery to correct this condition. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, he has pain and difficulty walking. His parents are asking for help to support his secondary surgery. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Stuwart. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 7th. Treatment will hopefully restore Stuwart's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Stuwart’s mother says, “His legs were straight, but over the months he has been walking we have noticed his legs are now bowing outwards. We will be so grateful if our son can be supported again.”

69% funded

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$614raised
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Annastasia

Annastasia is a very joyful lady. The 47-year-old is married and has five children. Two of her children have already finished school and are not yet financially stable. Her husband does not have a job but is sometimes able to get work as a bus driver when they need more help. Annastasia used to sell charcoal but she stopped the business three months ago when she fell ill and started her treatment process. In September of this year, she noticed a mass in her right breast. Three days later, she went to a facility near her home area, was examined, and told that she had mastitis. She was immediately admitted, put on medication and a few days later, she was discharged. While at home, she noticed that the swelling was getting bigger. She went back to the facility, was examined again, and referred to another nearby facility. In the facility scans and test were done and she was immediately referred to Kijabe Hospital for treatment. Upon arrival at Kijabe hospital, Annastasia was scheduled for urgent surgery. However, she is not in a financial position to cater for the surgery and is appealing for financial aid. Annastasia has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Without treatment, the cancer may spread to other organs. A mastectomy, a surgery to remove breast tissue, has been advised to rid her body of breast cancer and to prevent the cancer from metastasizing. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1110 to cover the cost of a mastectomy for Annastasia. The procedure is scheduled to take place on December 30th. After treatment, Annastasia will hopefully return to a cancer-free life. Annastasia says, "When I was told that the mass could be cancerous if not removed, I felt helpless and knew that it was over for me.”

75% funded

75%funded
$833raised
$277to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Stuwart

Stuwart is a 5-year-old boy and the only child in his family. He's a playful and friendly boy who is currently having a hard time walking due to his legs bending outwards. Stuwart is still in class one and he loves counting numbers and drawing. His father works as a bodaboda driver to be able to support and care for his family. His income is not much but helps them make ends meet. Early this year, Stuwart started having pain in his knees when he woke up and tried to stand. This went on for a few weeks and when his parents saw how much he was suffering they decided to seek treatment for him at a local hospital. Stuwart was diagnosed with bilateral genu varus (knock knees). His parents were informed that Stuwart will need to have surgery to correct both of his legs and prevent them from becoming further deformed and causing Stuwart pain. At that time, he was supported by Watsi last July to undergo surgery. He has now developed a genu valgus where his legs are now bowing outwards. To help stop this, Stuwart needs another surgery to correct this condition. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, he has pain and difficulty walking. His parents are asking for help to support his secondary surgery. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Stuwart. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 7th. Treatment will hopefully restore Stuwart's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Stuwart’s mother says, “His legs were straight, but over the months he has been walking we have noticed his legs are now bowing outwards. We will be so grateful if our son can be supported again.”

69% funded

69%funded
$614raised
$266to go