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Success! Pang from Cambodia raised $292 to fund eye surgery.

Pang
100%
  • $292 raised, $0 to go
$292
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Pang's treatment was fully funded on December 16, 2019.

Photo of Pang post-operation

August 9, 2019

Pang underwent eye surgery.

Pang’s operation went smoothly and he has returned home. His eye is a little bit swollen after surgery, but he’s been given drops to reduce inflammation and prevent infection. Following surgery, Pang’s eyes have been realigned, improving his vision and confidence.

Pang's operation went smoothly and he has returned home. His eye is a little bit swollen after surgery, but he's been given drops to reduce ...

Read more
August 1, 2019

Pang is a 69-year-old military officer from Cambodia. He has nine children, five grandchildren, and enjoys reading Buddhist scripture in his spare time.

Pang has strabismus in right. Strabismus is a misalignment of the eye caused by injury or dysfunction in the associated nerves and muscles. It is difficult for him to see straight and he is unable to do anything on his own.

Pang traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On August 1, surgeons at our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre (CSC), will perform a corrective procedure to align his eyes. Now, Pang needs help to raise $292 to fund this procedure.

He says, “I hope that after my surgery, I will be able to take care of my family and grandchildren and help with the housework.”

Pang is a 69-year-old military officer from Cambodia. He has nine children, five grandchildren, and enjoys reading Buddhist scripture in his...

Read more

Pang's Timeline

  • August 1, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Pang was submitted by Lindsay Bownik, Stakeholder Relations Officer at Children's Surgical Centre, our medical partner in Cambodia.

  • August 01, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Pang received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 01, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Pang's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • August 09, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Pang's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • December 16, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Pang's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 10 donors

Funded by 10 donors

Treatment
Squint / Strabismus
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $292 for Pang's treatment
Hospital Fees
$62
Medical Staff
$190
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A strabismus is a condition in which the eyes are not properly aligned with each other. This can cause decreased vision in children and double vision in adults.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

In children, strabismus can cause amblyopia, or lazy eye, where the vision development is stunted. If not treated early enough, amblyopia can cause permanent decreased vision or blindness. In adults, strabismus can cause double vision, which can be severely debilitating. In addition to headaches and eye strain, symptoms may include an inability to read comfortably, fatigue when reading, and unstable or "jittery" vision. Notably, strabismus interferes with normal eye contact, often causing embarrassment, anger, and feelings of awkwardness. It affects social communication in a fundamental way, with a possible negative effect on self esteem. One study showed that the behavior of strabismic children was marked by inhibition, anxiety, and emotional disorders.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

The etiology for strabismus in children is poorly understood. Strabismus affects children worldwide and is reported to be present in about 4% of children.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgeons identify and move muscles in the eye in order to straighten the eye. The conjunctiva (clear covering of the white part of the eye) is opened to reveal the muscle and then closed. This is usually done under general anesthesia.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

For children, straightening the eyes can help treat amblyopia and allow the pathway from the eyes to the brain to develop normally. For adults, straightening the eyes will improve double vision.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Strabismus surgery can cure the problem. The risk of surgery is low. Certain congenital disorders and syndromes can present with strabismus. In this case, children are fully evaluated by medical specialists.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Strabismus is primarily a surgical problem. Many patients travel from far provinces to our medical partner because they cannot receive this care locally.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Some strabismus can be treated with glasses or prisms, but surgery is usually needed.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Lay

Nan is a 22-year-old woman from Burma. She works as a medic at a clinic near her village. In her free time, she enjoys reading health-related books to gain more knowledge on the work she does. In 2014, while she was attending the medic training at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC), she had a fever which was followed by pain in her back and her right abdomen. Although she had ultrasound done at the clinic, the result showed normal. She was just treated for urinary tract infection, and she felt better after five days. In 2016, she again experienced pain in her abdomen but this time was on the left side. She went to a clinic in Taunggyi, Burma, where she again had an ultrasound imaging test. The result this time revealed a stone in her left ureter. The doctor told her to undergo surgery to remove the stone but because she could not afford the surgical cost 800,000 kyat (approx. 800 USD), she just asked for medication. Since then she had a few episode of severe abdominal pain, and she went to different hospitals in Burma to seek treatment but the doctors kept telling her that she needed surgery. One day in 2019, Nan ran into a friend who also had the same kind of health condition as hers. Her friend told her about the assistance she received at Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) and advised her to ask for help there. Nan then went to MTC, a partner organisation of BCMF. After confirming Nan's diagnosis, MTC referred her to BCMF. Nan still is experiencing back pain at the moment. She worries that her pain will increase when she has to travel. She has pain at her back and at suprapubic area, especially when she sits for a longer period of time and/or when she drinks insufficiently. Although Nan wants to continue learning and attending more training on medical and health, her health problem has limited her ability to finish her trainings. Nan said, “After I recovery from this condition, I will save money so that I can open a small shop, for my parents, to sell dry foods."

76% funded

76%funded
$1,147raised
$353to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Lay

Nan is a 22-year-old woman from Burma. She works as a medic at a clinic near her village. In her free time, she enjoys reading health-related books to gain more knowledge on the work she does. In 2014, while she was attending the medic training at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC), she had a fever which was followed by pain in her back and her right abdomen. Although she had ultrasound done at the clinic, the result showed normal. She was just treated for urinary tract infection, and she felt better after five days. In 2016, she again experienced pain in her abdomen but this time was on the left side. She went to a clinic in Taunggyi, Burma, where she again had an ultrasound imaging test. The result this time revealed a stone in her left ureter. The doctor told her to undergo surgery to remove the stone but because she could not afford the surgical cost 800,000 kyat (approx. 800 USD), she just asked for medication. Since then she had a few episode of severe abdominal pain, and she went to different hospitals in Burma to seek treatment but the doctors kept telling her that she needed surgery. One day in 2019, Nan ran into a friend who also had the same kind of health condition as hers. Her friend told her about the assistance she received at Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) and advised her to ask for help there. Nan then went to MTC, a partner organisation of BCMF. After confirming Nan's diagnosis, MTC referred her to BCMF. Nan still is experiencing back pain at the moment. She worries that her pain will increase when she has to travel. She has pain at her back and at suprapubic area, especially when she sits for a longer period of time and/or when she drinks insufficiently. Although Nan wants to continue learning and attending more training on medical and health, her health problem has limited her ability to finish her trainings. Nan said, “After I recovery from this condition, I will save money so that I can open a small shop, for my parents, to sell dry foods."

76% funded

76%funded
$1,147raised
$353to go