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Success! Alex from Kenya raised $542 to fund testicular surgery.

Alex
100%
  • $542 raised, $0 to go
$542
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Alex's treatment was fully funded on December 16, 2019.

Photo of Alex post-operation

December 5, 2019

Alex underwent testicular surgery.

Alex had a successful surgery. This treatment has minimized the risks of impaired fertility, testicular cancer and/or inguinal hernia. It has eliminated the risk of injuries to the undescended testicles that are also susceptible to sports injuries.

“The empathy you have shown us cannot be compared to anything I know of. Saying thank you barely seems adequate after all you have done. May God bless you,” says Alex’s mother.

Alex had a successful surgery. This treatment has minimized the risks of impaired fertility, testicular cancer and/or inguinal hernia. It ha...

Read more
September 26, 2019

Alex is a young boy from Kenya and has special needs. He was diagnosed with bilateral undescended testes at one year and his parents were advised to wait until he was older as there was a potential for the testes to descend. The wait has been long and the testes have still not descended.

Alex’s parents opted to bring him to Kijabe hospital where surgery has been recommended. If not treated, Alex is at risk of suffering fertility problems, testicular cancer and/or inguinal hernia. Alex recently joined a special school and is doing fine. The firstborn of two children, Alex, lives with his parents and younger sister in a two-room rental house in Central Kenya. His father is employed casually as an electrician while his mother is a stay-at-home mom. His father can only raise $10 which can barely pay the surgical care needed. The family appeals for help.

Alex will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on September 27th. AMHF is requesting $542 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care.

“I am pleading for financial help for my son. Please help us,” said Alex’s father.

Alex is a young boy from Kenya and has special needs. He was diagnosed with bilateral undescended testes at one year and his parents were ad...

Read more

Alex's Timeline

  • September 26, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Alex was submitted by Robert Kariuki, Process Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Kenya.

  • September 27, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Alex received treatment at BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital (BKKH). Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • November 10, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Alex's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 05, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Alex's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • December 16, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Alex's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 2 donors

Funded by 2 donors

Treatment
Orchidopexy (Double)
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $542 for Alex's treatment
Hospital Fees
$536
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$2
Supplies
$0
Labs
$4
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Normally, before a baby boy is born, the testicles move into the scrotum (the sac that holds the testicles). Sometimes, one or both testicles stay in the body cavity instead of moving into the scrotum. This is called undescended testicles or cryptorchidism. An orchidopexy is an operation to lower the testicles into the scrotum. A patient may need to have this operation on one or both testicles.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Ideally, the surgery should be performed before a child reaches two years old. Left untreated, this condition can lead to infertility. The higher temperature inside the body can affect sperm production. Men with both testicles affected are more likely to experience fertility-related issues than men with only one affected testicle. This condition can also cause inguinal hernia, in which the intestine protrudes through a weakened area in the abdominal wall. Only surgery can correct this condition, which can otherwise result in intestinal damage or death. Finally, this condition is a risk factor for testicular cancer. If surgery is performed early, this risk is limited.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Undescended testis is the most common birth anomaly in boys. This condition is present in about 1-4.5% of newborns, with a higher incidence in premature babies (30-45%). Unilateral undescended testis is four times more likely than bilateral.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After surgery, the patient will stay in the hospital for an average of three days. The patient is continually monitored.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Treatment will reduce the risk of infertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This condition is very treatable, and the procedure is low-risk.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality care centers in the region. Hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat this condition.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

An alternative to surgery is to use synthetic hormones that encourage the testicle to move into the scrotum. Hormone therapy is only recommended if the child’s testicle(s) are close to the scrotum. However, hormone therapy is not commonly available in Kenya. According to the guidelines published by the American Urological Association in May 2014, orchidopexy is the most successful therapy to relocate the testis into the scrotum. Hormone therapy is not recommended.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Khin

Htay is a 26-year-old-Araknese woman who lives with her younger sister in Yangon, Burma. Htay is in her final year of university. Her sister works as a seamstress in a shop and earns 200,000 kyat (approx.200 USD) per month. Their parents and their eldest sister are rice farmers in Rakhine State. Every year, they sell half of their harvest to earn an income. Htay's sister in Yangon sends their parents money occasionally, while their parents support Htay's medical expenses. The income that Htay's sister earns is enough to cover their daily expenses and pay for basic health care. In 2018, Htay started to feel very tired and could not sleep well at night. She also experienced chest pains if she walked anywhere far. She took traditional medicine which helped her feel and sleep better. However, she continued to feel tired and experience pain. One day in 2019, a neighbor who has a heart condition, told her that she could have a heart disease like her; the neighbor had also experienced the same symptoms as Htay. The neighbor advised her to seek treatment at Pinlon Hospital in Yangon, where the neighbor had undergone heart surgery. Htay decided to follow the neighbor's recommendation and also moved in with her sister in Yangon for extra support. In December 2019, Htay went to Pinlon Hospital to see a cardiologist. After receiving an echocardiogram (echo), the doctor told her that two valves in her heart no longer work and that she would need to receive surgery to replace those valves. The doctor also told her that because her condition is not severe, she did not need surgery yet. She received six month's worth of medication and a follow-up appointment for June 17th, 2020. When Htay came back for her appointment, she received another echo and an x-ray. After checking her results, the doctor told her that her condition had progressed and she now needed surgery, which would cost 15,000,000 kyat (approx.15,000 USD). When they learned about the price of the procedure, Htay and her sister lost hope of ever getting Htay treatment; they could not afford to pay such a large sum of money. When Htay told a nurse at the hospital called Sandar Ko about their financial situation, the nurse told her about an abbot who might be able to help her. The abbot heads Kyaung Gyi Parahita Monastery and is a partner of Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). Htay called the abbot and asked for help accessing surgery. The abbot then referred Htay to Watsi's Medical Partner BCMF for assistance receiving treatment at Pinlon Hospital. Currently, Htay feels tired and suffers from chest pains when she walks a lot. She cannot sleep very well at night and she feels short of breath at least twice a week. To try and cope with her symptoms mentally, she prays or recites Dhamma. She also tries to help her sister with household chore such as cooking and sweeping. She hopes that she will be able to continue her studies after surgery and she would like to work for the government as a civil servant once she graduates. Htay shared, “When I graduate, I will work and support my parents because they are getting old and they will not be able to work on the farm in the future.”

80% funded

80%funded
$1,207raised
$293to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Khin

Htay is a 26-year-old-Araknese woman who lives with her younger sister in Yangon, Burma. Htay is in her final year of university. Her sister works as a seamstress in a shop and earns 200,000 kyat (approx.200 USD) per month. Their parents and their eldest sister are rice farmers in Rakhine State. Every year, they sell half of their harvest to earn an income. Htay's sister in Yangon sends their parents money occasionally, while their parents support Htay's medical expenses. The income that Htay's sister earns is enough to cover their daily expenses and pay for basic health care. In 2018, Htay started to feel very tired and could not sleep well at night. She also experienced chest pains if she walked anywhere far. She took traditional medicine which helped her feel and sleep better. However, she continued to feel tired and experience pain. One day in 2019, a neighbor who has a heart condition, told her that she could have a heart disease like her; the neighbor had also experienced the same symptoms as Htay. The neighbor advised her to seek treatment at Pinlon Hospital in Yangon, where the neighbor had undergone heart surgery. Htay decided to follow the neighbor's recommendation and also moved in with her sister in Yangon for extra support. In December 2019, Htay went to Pinlon Hospital to see a cardiologist. After receiving an echocardiogram (echo), the doctor told her that two valves in her heart no longer work and that she would need to receive surgery to replace those valves. The doctor also told her that because her condition is not severe, she did not need surgery yet. She received six month's worth of medication and a follow-up appointment for June 17th, 2020. When Htay came back for her appointment, she received another echo and an x-ray. After checking her results, the doctor told her that her condition had progressed and she now needed surgery, which would cost 15,000,000 kyat (approx.15,000 USD). When they learned about the price of the procedure, Htay and her sister lost hope of ever getting Htay treatment; they could not afford to pay such a large sum of money. When Htay told a nurse at the hospital called Sandar Ko about their financial situation, the nurse told her about an abbot who might be able to help her. The abbot heads Kyaung Gyi Parahita Monastery and is a partner of Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). Htay called the abbot and asked for help accessing surgery. The abbot then referred Htay to Watsi's Medical Partner BCMF for assistance receiving treatment at Pinlon Hospital. Currently, Htay feels tired and suffers from chest pains when she walks a lot. She cannot sleep very well at night and she feels short of breath at least twice a week. To try and cope with her symptoms mentally, she prays or recites Dhamma. She also tries to help her sister with household chore such as cooking and sweeping. She hopes that she will be able to continue her studies after surgery and she would like to work for the government as a civil servant once she graduates. Htay shared, “When I graduate, I will work and support my parents because they are getting old and they will not be able to work on the farm in the future.”

80% funded

80%funded
$1,207raised
$293to go