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Koemsal is a loving father from Cambodia who needs $230 to fund foot surgery so he can walk easily again.

Koemsal
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  • $117 raised, $113 to go
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$113
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January 5, 2022

Koemsal is a 25-year-old married father. He and his wife are sellers in the local market. They sell soft drinks, snacks and fresh fruit. They have a very active 2-year-old daughter, who keeps them very busy since she learned to walk. In his free time, Koemsal likes to play football or volleyball with his friends.

Koemsal was in a motorcycle accident in March 2019; he suffered an open fracture of his right foot. A local hospital applied screws and a plate to repair the fracture, which never healed properly, and became infected. Over the past two years, his foot has slowly healed, but he has chronic pain and is unable to place weight on his foot. This makes it difficult for him to work or help his wife with their child. He shared that he feels poorly most of the time and ashamed that he is unable to support his family.

Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, can help. On January 5th, Koemsal will undergo surgery which will cost $230. This treatment will allow his foot to heal completely so that he can walk normally again.

He told us, “I hope that when the metal is removed from my foot, it will heal and I can work again to support my family.”

Koemsal is a 25-year-old married father. He and his wife are sellers in the local market. They sell soft drinks, snacks and fresh fruit. The...

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Koemsal's Timeline

  • January 5, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Koemsal was submitted by Ellen Interlandi, Volunteer at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • January 5, 2022
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Koemsal was scheduled to receive treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • January 7, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Koemsal's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Koemsal is currently raising funds for his treatment.

  • TBD
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Koemsal's treatment update from Children's Surgical Centre.

Funded by 1 donor

Funded by 1 donor

Treatment
ORIF / Fracture
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $230 for Koemsal's treatment
Hospital Fees
$35
Medical Staff
$147
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients who experience painful fractures or recurrent dislocations need ORIF (open reduction internal fixation) surgeries to heal the injuries. Most often, these fractures and dislocations result from traffic accidents. ORIF procedures require the insertion of metal plates, screws, or rods to stabilize the bones while they heal. Bowleg procedures also require the insertion of hardware, such as staples, in order to realign the legs. Bowleg can be caused both by genetics and by vitamin and mineral deficiencies. However, surgeons may decide to remove the hardware. The most common reason for hardware removal is pain or loss of mobility and range of motion around the ORIF site. Other reasons include infection, nerve damage, incomplete healing of the bone, or an allergy to the implant.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Living with hardware fixation causes pain, limits function, and can interfere with daily activities.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

There is a high rate of traffic accidents in Cambodia because of a lack of helmet usage and weak enforcement of traffic laws. These accidents cause many of the fractures and bone dislocations that our medical partner sees.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

During an ORIF procedure, the deformed or broken bone is correctly aligned into its normal position. Steel rods, screws, or plates are used to keep the bone fracture stable and allow it to heal. Sometimes, bone grafting is needed to promote healing. During hardware removal, surgeons use the previous incisions to find and remove the hardware. In some cases, additional incisions are made to safely perform the operation.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Patients will experience restored function and mobility. They will also have reduced pain. Patients can be independent again and return to work, school, and family life.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This surgery is low-risk and extremely effective.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Rural Cambodians often self-medicate or seek treatment from traditional healers because they cannot afford treatment at local clinics or hospitals. Many patients are referred to CSC by word of mouth.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There is no alternative to this treatment.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Salomy

Salomy is a sixty-two-year-old farmer, a mother of 6 (3 boys and 3 girls), and a wife to a loving husband who had a stroke in 2010. Salomy is a very responsible woman and able to take care of the family including her grandchildren through small-scale farming and business. She sells Irish potatoes the she grows on her family farm in Malawi. She owns a big farm and used to make lots of produce; unfortunately the productivity has now gone down as she is unable to work or supervise the farm work due to her current health condition. Eight years ago Salomy developed a swelling in the neck and she assumed it would go away with time. When she noticed that the swelling was still growing, she started visiting the nearest health center. At that point then she was able to continue working in her field and do her business as usual. For the past 2 years however, the condition has destabilized her normal life since she cannot breathe properly and she cannot walk a long distance to buy the products she needs to sell. This has been a very challenging part as a breadwinner to sustain the home and provide the required support to her sick husband. Salomy visited a number of hospitals but had no chance to meet a surgeon to discuss how her problem will be solved. A month ago she was talking to a friend who partially knows about Partners in Hope and she asked a relative from Lilongwe to enquire for her. She learned that she could be able to meet the surgeon and traveled all the way from Mzimba to Lilongwe where she is now temporarily lodging at her distant relative’s home just to have her surgery. She met the surgeon who made a diagnosis of goiter and recommended surgical removal of the goiter in a procedure called thyroidectomy. Goiter is an abnormal enlargement of the thyroid gland on the front and sides of the neck. Thyroidectomy, on the other hand, is the surgical removal of the enlarged thyroid gland as treatment for the goiter. Salomy is unable to meet the whole cost of surgery due to her multiple responsibilities and she has no medical insurance. She believes the surgical operation will give her peace of mind, the symptoms will go away and she will continue providing her best support to her family and especially her husband who is unable to do most of the things by himself. The surgery will restore Salomy’s multiple abilities as the main pillar of the family. Salomy says, "My main fear is the responsibilities that I carry as a farmer, a breadwinner, a mother, a wife, and a grandmother. If I go unassisted all these important roles will suffer. When successful, the surgery will not only benefit me but mostly the whole family that I care for."

70% funded

70%funded
$711raised
$304to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Salomy

Salomy is a sixty-two-year-old farmer, a mother of 6 (3 boys and 3 girls), and a wife to a loving husband who had a stroke in 2010. Salomy is a very responsible woman and able to take care of the family including her grandchildren through small-scale farming and business. She sells Irish potatoes the she grows on her family farm in Malawi. She owns a big farm and used to make lots of produce; unfortunately the productivity has now gone down as she is unable to work or supervise the farm work due to her current health condition. Eight years ago Salomy developed a swelling in the neck and she assumed it would go away with time. When she noticed that the swelling was still growing, she started visiting the nearest health center. At that point then she was able to continue working in her field and do her business as usual. For the past 2 years however, the condition has destabilized her normal life since she cannot breathe properly and she cannot walk a long distance to buy the products she needs to sell. This has been a very challenging part as a breadwinner to sustain the home and provide the required support to her sick husband. Salomy visited a number of hospitals but had no chance to meet a surgeon to discuss how her problem will be solved. A month ago she was talking to a friend who partially knows about Partners in Hope and she asked a relative from Lilongwe to enquire for her. She learned that she could be able to meet the surgeon and traveled all the way from Mzimba to Lilongwe where she is now temporarily lodging at her distant relative’s home just to have her surgery. She met the surgeon who made a diagnosis of goiter and recommended surgical removal of the goiter in a procedure called thyroidectomy. Goiter is an abnormal enlargement of the thyroid gland on the front and sides of the neck. Thyroidectomy, on the other hand, is the surgical removal of the enlarged thyroid gland as treatment for the goiter. Salomy is unable to meet the whole cost of surgery due to her multiple responsibilities and she has no medical insurance. She believes the surgical operation will give her peace of mind, the symptoms will go away and she will continue providing her best support to her family and especially her husband who is unable to do most of the things by himself. The surgery will restore Salomy’s multiple abilities as the main pillar of the family. Salomy says, "My main fear is the responsibilities that I carry as a farmer, a breadwinner, a mother, a wife, and a grandmother. If I go unassisted all these important roles will suffer. When successful, the surgery will not only benefit me but mostly the whole family that I care for."

70% funded

70%funded
$711raised
$304to go