Meet another patient

Watsi logo blueWatsi

Success! Baraing from Cambodia raised $809 for ear surgery.

Baraing
100%
  • $809 raised, $0 to go
$809
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Baraing's treatment was fully funded on April 26, 2016.

Photo of Baraing post-operation

May 18, 2016

Baraing received successful ear surgery.

“Baraing’s mastoidectomy went well,” reports his medical team. “He will have an audiogram in six weeks, after the ear packing and sutures are removed, to test his hearing improvement.”

“I am really happy that I had the surgery done. My ear disease is healed now and the discharge has stopped,” shares Baraing. “Once I get better I hope to return to school and have better hearing.”

"Baraing's mastoidectomy went well," reports his medical team. "He will have an audiogram in six weeks, after the ear packing and sutures ar...

Read more
April 18, 2016

“I am unhappy that I have left ear pain and it is difficult to communicate with other people. Sometimes I can not go to school,” says Bairang, a 17-year-old boy from Cambodia who enjoys listening to music and using Facebook.

Bairang has had daily discharge in his left ear since he was six years old, due to an untreated ear infection. Despite seeking treatment at other hospitals in Cambodia, he continues to experience discharge, pain, and hearing loss in his left ear.

He and his family traveled three hours from their home in Kampot for surgery. When he arrived at Children’s Surgical Centre (CSC) in Phnom Penh, doctors discovered his condition was due to a cholesteatoma, an abnormal skin growth in the middle ear behind the eardrum. Without treatment, a cholesteatoma can continue to grow and cause permanent hearing loss, dizziness, facial muscle paralysis, as well as create infections that can spread to the brain and cause death.

“I am a little afraid to have surgery,” says Bairang, “but I need it. I hope that with surgery my ear discharge stops and I can have good health. I want to be a doctor one day to help people, and with good hearing I can do that.”

For $809, Bairang will have surgery to remove the cholesteatoma. With surgery, he will no longer experience discharge, pain, and hearing loss or be at risk for facial paralysis, infections, and death.

"I am unhappy that I have left ear pain and it is difficult to communicate with other people. Sometimes I can not go to school," says Bairan...

Read more

Baraing's Timeline

  • April 18, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Baraing was submitted by Hannah Callas, Stakeholder Relations Officer at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • April 18, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Baraing's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • April 19, 2016
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Baraing received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • April 26, 2016
    FULLY FUNDED

    Baraing's treatment was fully funded.

  • May 18, 2016
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Baraing's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 15 donors

Funded by 15 donors

Treatment
Mastoidectomy
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A mastoidectomy is a surgical procedure that removes diseased mastoid air cells. A patient who needs a mastoidectomy will experience hearing loss, chronic ear infections, and possibly cholesteatoma—an abnormal skin growth in the middle ear. Cholesteatomas cause hearing loss and ear discharge. The cholesteatoma will erode bones in the middle ear and can eventually expose the brain and cause death in complicated, untreated cases.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients live with hearing loss and chronic ear infections.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Treated incorrectly or left untreated, an infected mastoid bone can cause hearing loss, persistent ear discharge, meningitis, temporary dizziness, and temporary loss of taste. Due to poor hygiene and limited education in rural Cambodia, patients are likely to experience complications and receive the incorrect treatment.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

A mastoidectomy is performed with the patient asleep under general anesthesia. Surgeons will perform one of several different types of mastoidectomy, depending on the amount of infection present. These include: • Simple (or closed) mastoidectomy: The operation is performed through the ear or through an incision behind the ear. The surgeon opens the mastoid bone and removes the infected air cells. The eardrum is incised to drain the middle ear. Topical antibiotics are placed in the ear. • Radical mastoidectomy: This procedure removes the most bone and is usually performed for extensive spread of a cholesteatoma. The eardrum and middle ear structures may be completely removed. Usually the stapes, the "stirrup"-shaped bone, is spared to preserve some hearing. • Modified radical mastoidectomy: In this procedure, some middle ear bones are left in place, and the eardrum is rebuilt by tympanoplasty. After surgery, the wound is stitched up around a drainage tube, and a dressing is applied.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This treatment will relieve chronic ear infections, hearing loss, and other symptoms caused by the infected mastoid bone.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This treatment is highly effective, but it poses risks if performed by an inexperienced surgeon. The operation is near the facial nerve and the brain, so surgeons must be careful when operating. At Children's Surgical Centre, ENT surgeons only operate on cases about which they feel confident.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Care for this condition is not easily accessible in Phnom Penh. Only one other hospital performs ENT surgery, but care at that hospital is expensive. The ENT surgeons at our medical partner have a proven record of successful cases.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Once the infection stops responding to antibiotics, surgery is the only option.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Purity

Purity is an adorable seven-month-old baby who was born with spina bifida. She is the youngest of two children in her family. Her parents previously relied on casual labor to support their family, meaning they would pick up work wherever and whenever it was available. However, with jobs currently being so hard to find, they now do small-scale farming to provide for their family. Since she was born, Purity has had a swelling on her lower back. A few days after birth, her parents took her to a nearby facility, where she was examined three times without receiving any help. During the fourth visit, she was referred to another facility in the bigger city of Nakuru. There, she was diagnosed with spina bifida, a condition caused by the spine not properly closing around the spinal cord. After receiving a diagnosis, Purity was referred to our medical partner's care center, BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital (BKKH), for treatment. Last week, Purity's family was finally able to gather enough money to bring her to BKKH for an evaluation. However, due to financial constraints, her family is unable to fund the procedure needed to help her condition. Without treatment, Purity is at risk of lower-limb paralysis, infection of the exposed nervous tissue, development of tethered cord syndrome, and possible developmental delays. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is able to help. Purity is scheduled to undergo spina bifida closure surgery on July 7th. Now, AMH is requesting $1,151 to cover the cost of Purity's spinal surgery. This procedure will hopefully spare Purity from the risks associated with her condition, instead allowing her to grow and develop along a healthy trajectory. Purity’s mother says, “I’m not happy to see my child with this condition. I would really like her to be treated and have a normal life.”

53% funded

53%funded
$618raised
$533to go
Titus

Titus is the eldest son in a family of four. He shared his life's story with us: sometime back, his father was involved in a fatal argument with a neighbor, and went to prison. Titus' family became homeless as a result of this incident, and Titus could not stay in school after 8th grade due to financial difficulties. Recently, he has been working getting jobs near his home and sometimes he works at construction sites in order to earn a living. His jobs enable him to get his daily basic needs and be able to pay for his rent. Generally, Titus’ life is hard, and it is difficult for him to makes ends meet. Titus had a burn accident and his relatives rushed him to the hospital for treatment of severe burns on his hand and superficial burns on his chest and face. He has been on a daily dressing regime to lower the risk of infection and his doctor has determined that he needs a skin graft surgery in order to replace the lost skin and restore function of his right upper limb and forearm. Titus is requesting to be discharged home from the hospital without further treatment because he does not want the bill to accumulate as it will be hard to pay. However, it is critical for him to have the surgery, so that he can have the full use of his right arm. He needs $1,089 to pay for the surgery. Titus says, "Life has really been hard for me: when a problem ends, another one begins. I am so desperate, but I will not lose hope because someday things will be well. I kindly ask for your help to get well so that I may be able to continue working in order to change my current state.”

34% funded

34%funded
$371raised
$718to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Purity

Purity is an adorable seven-month-old baby who was born with spina bifida. She is the youngest of two children in her family. Her parents previously relied on casual labor to support their family, meaning they would pick up work wherever and whenever it was available. However, with jobs currently being so hard to find, they now do small-scale farming to provide for their family. Since she was born, Purity has had a swelling on her lower back. A few days after birth, her parents took her to a nearby facility, where she was examined three times without receiving any help. During the fourth visit, she was referred to another facility in the bigger city of Nakuru. There, she was diagnosed with spina bifida, a condition caused by the spine not properly closing around the spinal cord. After receiving a diagnosis, Purity was referred to our medical partner's care center, BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital (BKKH), for treatment. Last week, Purity's family was finally able to gather enough money to bring her to BKKH for an evaluation. However, due to financial constraints, her family is unable to fund the procedure needed to help her condition. Without treatment, Purity is at risk of lower-limb paralysis, infection of the exposed nervous tissue, development of tethered cord syndrome, and possible developmental delays. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is able to help. Purity is scheduled to undergo spina bifida closure surgery on July 7th. Now, AMH is requesting $1,151 to cover the cost of Purity's spinal surgery. This procedure will hopefully spare Purity from the risks associated with her condition, instead allowing her to grow and develop along a healthy trajectory. Purity’s mother says, “I’m not happy to see my child with this condition. I would really like her to be treated and have a normal life.”

53% funded

53%funded
$618raised
$533to go