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Success! Theav from Cambodia raised $465 to fund mobility-restoring fracture repair.

Theav
100%
  • $465 raised, $0 to go
$465
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Theav's treatment was fully funded on December 12, 2020.

Photo of Theav post-operation

June 26, 2020

Theav underwent mobility-restoring fracture repair.

Theav’s surgery was successful! Her doctors were able to repair her tibia fracture. She will go to physical therapy to strengthen her leg and be able to walk once she fully recovers. Her quality of life will significantly improve and she can go back to studying to become a teacher of Khmer literature.

“I am so happy to have my surgery here, thank you and I am grateful for all your help,” shared Theav.

Theav's surgery was successful! Her doctors were able to repair her tibia fracture. She will go to physical therapy to strengthen her leg an...

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April 28, 2020

Theav is a 24-year-old Khmer teacher from Cambodia. She has six siblings and is the third child. Since finishing high school, she has gone to teach Khmer language in her community everyday. She enjoys listening to music and planting flowers around home in her free time.

When Theav was just a child her leg had a swelling and redness that caused her mom to take her to a Khmer traditional healer. They were able to improve the condition of her leg so she could walk, but about 14 years later she noticed problems with the same leg. It became painful and she had to start walking with a crutch. Doctors have examined her leg and discovered a non-union tibia fracture. Going in public with her condition is upsetting to her and makes her shy. Presently, the pain is bad enough to prevent her from walking at all.

Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, can help. On April 28th, Theav will undergo a fracture repair procedure, which will cost $465. The procedure will help her leg straighten allowing her to walk without any pain in the future.

“I hope that I will be able to walk better. I will continue my study at university and want to become a teacher of Khmer literature when I graduate,” Theav said.

Theav is a 24-year-old Khmer teacher from Cambodia. She has six siblings and is the third child. Since finishing high school, she has gone t...

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Theav's Timeline

  • April 28, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Theav was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre, our medical partner in Cambodia.

  • April 28, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Theav received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • April 29, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Theav's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • June 26, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Theav's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • December 12, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Theav's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 9 donors

Funded by 9 donors

Treatment
ORIF / External Fixation / Fracture
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $465 for Theav's treatment
Hospital Fees
$65
Medical Staff
$311
Medication
$0
Supplies
$81
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients in need of open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) surgeries experience painful fractures or recurrent dislocations. Usually, these injuries result from traffic accidents or other trauma injuries.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Living with an abnormal or deformed bone limits function and can interfere with daily activities. It is also extremely painful.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Due to lack of helmet usage and weak enforcement of traffic laws, there is a high rate of traffic accidents in Cambodia. This causes many of the fractures and bone dislocations our medical partner sees.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The deformed or abnormal bone is broken and correctly aligned, and any fragments are fixed. Following the realignment of the bone, metal plates, pins, rods, wires, or screws are attached to the bone for stabilization as the internal fixation.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Patients will experience restored function and mobility and reduced pain. Patients regain independence and return to work, school, and family life.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Complications from this surgery are rare but include infection, nerve damage, blood clots, and tissue irritation from the hardware.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Rural Cambodians often self-medicate or seek treatment from traditional healers because they cannot afford hospital treatment. Many patients are referred to CSC by word of mouth.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There is no alternative care for this treatment.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

U Win

U Win is a 54-year-old man who lives with his wife and youngest son in the Ayeyarwaddy Division in Burma. He has three sons and three daughters, with five of his children already married and working. His 17-year-old son left school because they were unable to pay school fees, and worked as a day laborer until COVID-19 happened. U Win used to work as a day laborer as well, but stopped working around two years ago due to his health condition. His family survives on 60,000 kyat (approx. 60 USD) each month that U Win's three other daughters and another son send them, enough to cover their basic expenses. In January 2012, U Win felt tired, had a headache, suffered from heart palpitations, and a rapid heartbeat. He went to a clinic where the doctor listened to his heart with a stethoscope and checked his blood pressure. U Win was told that he has high blood pressure and that he would need to take oral medication for a long time. He received an injection, oral medication, and another appointment for more medication. After he took the medication, he felt better and he went back to work. However, U Win continued to experience worsening symptoms over the next few years, returning to clinics and receiving the same treatment. He was told at one point to visit a cardiologist, but did not do so until later on. In August 2020, during another clinic visit in Yangon, the doctor diagnosed U Win with an atrial septal defect, and said that he would need to receive surgery to repair this hole in his heart. If not treated, the condition could weaken his heart further and cause lung problems later on. He was unable to receive surgery in November due to an upsurge in COVID-19 cases, and was also told the procedure would cost about 3,000,000 kyat (approx. 3,000 USD). Luckily, U Win’s wife remembered that there is a charity group in Yangon that might be able to help. The group told him about our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, to look for assistance with accessing the treatment he needed. U Win currently experiences chest pain and back pain, has no appetite, and cannot sleep well at night. He appeals for financial support for his cost of care. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 20th, U Win will undergo an atrial septal defect closure procedure. Once recovered, his quality of life will significantly improve and he will be able to return to work. Now, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. U Win shared, “I want to get better soon so that I can work for my family again. I am worried about my family’s future because we cannot find work in the village. My son also cannot go to Yangon to find another job because of COVID-19 travel restrictions.”

81% funded

81%funded
$1,216raised
$284to go
Margaret

Margaret is a 65-year-old woman from Kenya. She is a happy lady with two adult sons, whom she raised as a young, single mother. Margaret initially sought care due to excruciating pains in her knee and right leg. Her knee problems started back in late 2017, and she visited a health facility in her hometown, Kiambu, for medical attention. However, after that first treatment, her condition has only deteriorated. After visiting several health centers, she was referred to our medical partner's care center, Kijabe Hospital. In early October, she was reviewed by their orthopedic team, who recommended a total knee replacement surgery. Margaret underwent a knee replacement procedure and was finally discharged after a lengthy stay in the hospital. Unfortunately, during her follow-up clinical review visits, her doctors continued to discover infections and fluctuant swelling that require further attention and treatment. Margaret has undergone additional treatment including draining and debridement on the area that was operated on during her total knee replacement surgery. Now, she will need another debridement and skin graft procedure, in addition to a total knee implant hardware removal, to prevent possible infections that could result in amputation or even death. She is currently ambulating on crutches. In the past, Margaret relied on national health insurance funding to support her medical and surgical treatment costs. However, the money has been depleted over time, and they are unable to cover any additional surgical bills for her. Margaret does not work and has been relying on her sons for physical and financial support. They do not have have stable jobs and are responsible for monitoring her treatment and care. Margaret and her sons have tried to raise funds from friends and relatives, to no avail. They are appealing for financial help. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Margaret receive treatment. On November 4th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to heal the infection and allow her to walk more easily. Now, Margaret needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. Margaret shared, “I have been through a lot with this leg. Anytime it heals, the pain starts again. I can’t even sleep because of the pain. I appreciate any support you can provide."

75% funded

75%funded
$894raised
$291to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

U Win

U Win is a 54-year-old man who lives with his wife and youngest son in the Ayeyarwaddy Division in Burma. He has three sons and three daughters, with five of his children already married and working. His 17-year-old son left school because they were unable to pay school fees, and worked as a day laborer until COVID-19 happened. U Win used to work as a day laborer as well, but stopped working around two years ago due to his health condition. His family survives on 60,000 kyat (approx. 60 USD) each month that U Win's three other daughters and another son send them, enough to cover their basic expenses. In January 2012, U Win felt tired, had a headache, suffered from heart palpitations, and a rapid heartbeat. He went to a clinic where the doctor listened to his heart with a stethoscope and checked his blood pressure. U Win was told that he has high blood pressure and that he would need to take oral medication for a long time. He received an injection, oral medication, and another appointment for more medication. After he took the medication, he felt better and he went back to work. However, U Win continued to experience worsening symptoms over the next few years, returning to clinics and receiving the same treatment. He was told at one point to visit a cardiologist, but did not do so until later on. In August 2020, during another clinic visit in Yangon, the doctor diagnosed U Win with an atrial septal defect, and said that he would need to receive surgery to repair this hole in his heart. If not treated, the condition could weaken his heart further and cause lung problems later on. He was unable to receive surgery in November due to an upsurge in COVID-19 cases, and was also told the procedure would cost about 3,000,000 kyat (approx. 3,000 USD). Luckily, U Win’s wife remembered that there is a charity group in Yangon that might be able to help. The group told him about our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, to look for assistance with accessing the treatment he needed. U Win currently experiences chest pain and back pain, has no appetite, and cannot sleep well at night. He appeals for financial support for his cost of care. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 20th, U Win will undergo an atrial septal defect closure procedure. Once recovered, his quality of life will significantly improve and he will be able to return to work. Now, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. U Win shared, “I want to get better soon so that I can work for my family again. I am worried about my family’s future because we cannot find work in the village. My son also cannot go to Yangon to find another job because of COVID-19 travel restrictions.”

81% funded

81%funded
$1,216raised
$284to go