Meet another patient

Watsi logo blueWatsi

Success! Kwarisiima from Uganda raised $206 to fund a mass removal.

Kwarisiima
100%
  • $206 raised, $0 to go
$206
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Kwarisiima's treatment was fully funded on December 1, 2020.

Photo of Kwarisiima post-operation

July 10, 2020

Kwarisiima underwent a mass removal.

Kwarisiima had a successful excision treatment to remove a lipoma. He feels better and is relieved that he no longer has the condition which disfigured him for so long. He hopes to have a better quality of life after recovering.

Kwarisiima shared, “I thank you so much because this condition had made me look disfigured. I am so appreciative for this support as I am now fine and I hope to continue with my small stationary retail business.”

Kwarisiima had a successful excision treatment to remove a lipoma. He feels better and is relieved that he no longer has the condition which...

Read more
June 8, 2020

Kwarisiima is a 30-year-old businessman from Uganda. He is a married father to one young child who is in nursery class. Personally, he never proceeded with his education after senior class six due to lack of school fees. He currently earns a living from his small business where he operates a small retail stationery selling shop. His wife is a nursery teacher and they all stay together in a single-roomed rental house in the village.

Kwarisiima presented at the hospital with a left-sided frontal regional swelling since 2009. The swelling has kept on increasing in size over the years and this has worried him a lot.

Kwarisiima traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On June 9th, surgeons will remove the mass. Now, Kwarisiima needs help to raise $206 to fund this procedure.

Kwarisiima says: “I hope to get relieved from all the pain I have been having and expect to continue hustling to provide to my family.”

Kwarisiima is a 30-year-old businessman from Uganda. He is a married father to one young child who is in nursery class. Personally, he never...

Read more

Kwarisiima's Timeline

  • June 8, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Kwarisiima was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Uganda.

  • June 09, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Kwarisiima received treatment at Karoli Lwanga Hospital, Nyakibale. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • June 10, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Kwarisiima's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • July 10, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Kwarisiima's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • December 01, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Kwarisiima's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 2 donors

Funded by 2 donors

Treatment
Mass Excision
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $206 for Kwarisiima's treatment
Hospital Fees
$115
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$29
Supplies
$28
Labs
$34
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Broadly speaking, masses come in two types: benign (not cancer) and malignant (cancer). The types of tumors are many and could range from osteosarcoma of the jaw (a bone tumor) to thyroid enlargement to breast lump to lipoma (benign fat tumor), among others. The symptoms vary depending on the type of tumor. Not all tumors, cancerous or benign, show symptoms. A common benign tumor, such as a lipoma (fatty tumor), may cause local pressure and pain, or may be disfiguring and socially stigmatizing. An ovarian mass may be benign or cancerous and may cause pain, bleeding, or, if malignant, death.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If the tumor is cancerous, it is usually aggressive and invasive. If not treated (like certain skin cancers, for example) there could be great tissue destruction, pain, deformity, and ultimately death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Due to lack of accessibility to treatment facilities, some of the patients have lived with masses for a long time. Access to medical facilities is difficult for people living in remote parts of Uganda.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient is usually admitted for three days. They undergo three- to five-hour surgery depending on the location of the mass and whether it's cancerous. After surgery, they are continuously monitored in the wards.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of cancer, the procedure can be life-saving. In the case of benign tumors, patients can be free of pain or social stigma.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

If the tumor is cancerous, the surgeon will only try to remove it if the procedure would be curative. If cancer has already spread, then surgery cannot help. Most of these surgeries are not very risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few qualified facilities and surgeons to perform this procedure.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Alternatives depend on the type of tumor. If the tumor is cancerous, chemotherapy may help, but that treatment is even less available than surgery. If the tumor is benign, it depends on the condition but just watching the mass would be one option.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Khaing

Khaing is a 35-year-old woman from Thailand. Her husband is a day laborer while she is a homemaker who looks after their two-year-old daughter at home. Khaing's husband earns 5,000 baht (approx. 166 USD) per month as there is less work, they shared, since the outbreak of COVID-19. In her free time, Khaing likes to make Burmese fish noodle soup called moh hin khar. In the middle of June 2020, Khaing started to vomit each time after eating. She also experienced chest pain and discomfort in her stomach after eating and drinking. A few days after she first felt unwell, she went to a private clinic near her home. She received pain medication and one injection, and she was told she was suffering from an inflammation in her stomach. Khaing felt better after taking the medicine but by the end of July, Khaing actually felt worse. She started to experienced back and lower abdominal pain and constipation. Her abdomen also increased in size and she started to lose weight. Khaing's neighbor told her she was pregnant and Khaing believed her. Around 15 days after her new symptoms began, Khaing purchased a pregnancy test from a shop which showed she was not pregnant. Khaing thought someone might have cursed her so she then went to a fortune teller to ask for help. When the fortune teller told her she was not cursed, Khaing started to believe that she might be really be ill. She went to Mae Tao Clinic on August 20th, 2020. At the clinic, she received diagnostic tests which showed that both of her kidneys are swollen, a condition called hydronehrosis. She was then taken to Mae Sot Hospital on August 25th for further investigation and is now scheduled to return for treatment. While waiting for her appointment, Khaing's condition worsened. Her stomach is still increasing in size, she can no longer eat or sleep properly and she feels very uncomfortable. The pain in her lower abdomen had also worsened. When she called and talked to the medic, she was told to come back to the hospital sooner. At the hospital she received a blood test, and she was told she would need a CT scan so that the doctor could properly diagnose and treat her. Unable to pay for the CT scan, the MTC medic later referred Khaing to Watsi's Medical Partner Burma Children Medical Fund. Currently, Khaing cannot walk because she feels like her stomach is very heavy. She feels uncomfortable when she lays down and she cannot sleep well. She is still experiencing lower abdominal and back pain. Whenever she eats or drinks, she vomits. She also noticed that since the end of July she has to urinate frequently, but she is only able to pass a small amount each time. Doctors want Khaing to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose her condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner is requesting $414 to cover the cost of Khaing's CT scan and care, now scheduled for September 14th. Khaing said, “I feel stressed and angry. I also don't want to talk to other people and I'm growing inpatient with my daughter. Also I'm feeling worried that I will die early [at a young age]. I don’t want to die because my daughter is still very young.”

56% funded

56%funded
$235raised
$179to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.