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Success! Chora from Cambodia raised $474 to fund a skin graft procedure to help him use his hand again.

Chora
100%
  • $474 raised, $0 to go
$474
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Chora's treatment was fully funded on April 6, 2022.

Photo of Chora post-operation

April 18, 2022

Chora underwent a skin graft procedure to help him use his hand again.

Chora’s surgery was a success! Doctors gave him antibiotics to decrease the risk of an infection and will continue to monitor his healing. Once his skin graft has healed, Chora will work with the physiotherapy team to build up his muscle strength so he can use his hand again. Because of this surgery, Chora can return to his work in construction to support his growing family.

Chora shared, “I am relieved my hand will finally be fixed and I can use it again for work. Thank you for helping me to be healthy again.”

Chora's surgery was a success! Doctors gave him antibiotics to decrease the risk of an infection and will continue to monitor his healing. O...

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January 10, 2022

Chora is a 22-year-old welder and construction worker. He is married and lives with his wife, who works as a rice and potato farmer. They recently welcomed a son to their family. When he is not working in construction, he likes to exercise and play with his son.

In October 2021, Chora was welding a roof on a new house when he got an electrical burn on his left hand. He received treatment at a local hospital, but his hand became infected. He is unable to flex his thumb or use his hand, the muscles have atrophied, and he cannot work. He experiences pain and spent several weeks in the hospital to help heal his wound. He requires a skin graft procedure to repair his hand.

When Chora learned about our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre (CSC), he traveled for seven hours seeking treatment. On January 11th, surgeons at CSC will perform a skin graft procedure to transfer a skin flap to cover the site that was infected and allow Chora to use his hand again. Now, he needs help to fund this $474 procedure.

Chora shared, “I hope that the surgeons can fix my burns so that I can work again. I have a newborn son and need to work to support my family.”

Chora is a 22-year-old welder and construction worker. He is married and lives with his wife, who works as a rice and potato farmer. They re...

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Chora's Timeline

  • January 10, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Chora was submitted by Ellen Interlandi, Volunteer at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • January 11, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Chora received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • January 14, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Chora's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • April 6, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Chora's treatment was fully funded.

  • April 18, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Chora's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 10 donors

Funded by 10 donors

Treatment
Skin Graft
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $474 for Chora's treatment
Hospital Fees
$118
Medical Staff
$308
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A variety of injuries related to extensive skin loss can necessitate a skin graft. These include large open wounds, infection, and third degree burns. Additionally, surgeries such as removal of skin cancers require skin grafts to heal.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients who have injuries that are in need of a skin graft are in compromised health and at risk of infection from bacteria or viruses entering through the open wound.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Road traffic accidents— particularly with motorcycles—are a common cause of injuries in Cambodia and can often result in surgeries that involve a skin graft. The use of open stoves additionally can increase risk of burns, especially in children.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Skin grafting involves covering the affected area with healthy skin from a donor site. In a split-thickness skin graft, the top two layers of the donor skin, or the graft, are transplanted and attached by staples or stitches, and the donor-area is covered with a dressing. For injuries with deeper tissue loss, a full-thickness skin graft may be used, which transplants a full flap of skin, including the muscles and blood supply, and is a more complicated procedure. Prior to the skin transfer, debridement may be needed to remove dead or damaged skin. Following a skin graft surgery, patients will remain at the hospital for 1-2 weeks for follow-up care.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

By replacing damaged or missing skin with a skin graft, the patient’s risk of disease-causing bacteria or viruses entering the body are decreased; the graft also aids in fluid loss prevention and temperature regulation, improving the overall health of the patient.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

One risk of skin grafting is graft failure, caused commonly by blood collecting in the tissues, which necessitates a repeat graft. Other risks include infection, chronic pain, and wound contracture. Potential side effects are scarring, skin discoloration, or reduced skin sensation.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Injuries in need of skin grafts require surgical operation; affordable surgical care is not very accessible, and so patients travel as much as twelve hours to reach Children's Surgical Centre for free surgery, arriving by bus, motorbike, or taxi.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

The skin grafts performed at Children’s Surgical Centre are autographs, or grafts of the patient’s own skin. Alternatives to this include artificial skin grafts, which are used when patients do not have enough skin to cover the exposed area.

Meet another patient you can support

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Night

Meet Night, a jovial and playful five year old girl. Night lives with her parents and two younger siblings in a traditional home in Kenya. Her father works selling second hand clothing, while her mother stays home to take care of the children. Shortly after she was born, Night's parents realized that something seemed wrong. They brought Night to a health facility in Turkana County where they lived, and were referred on to BethanyKids Hospital. There she was diagnosed with hydrocephalus, which meant that fluid was collecting in her head. Surgery was performed, and a shunt was placed to continuously drain the fluid from Night's head. A year later, however, Night's head began to increase in size, and she developed weakness on the right side of her body. The doctors at the local health facility urged Night's parents to take her back to BethanyKids Hospital for additional treatment, but Night's parents didn't have enough money to do this. With the help of our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, Night is now scheduled to undergo a craniotomy on January 5th at BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital, when surgeons will drain excess fluids from Night's brain. Night's father is providing as much of a co-pay as possible for this procedure, but the family needs your help to raise the remaining $1,500 required to cover all of the costs of Night's surgery and care. Night’s father said: “Night is not able to communicate well because of her condition. This surgery will help her to be able to speak.”

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51%funded
$771raised
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Son

Son is a 21-year-old mother of two. She and her husband have two sons - one is four years old and the other is one year old. Both she and her husband are construction workers. When not working outside on construction sites, she is a busy mother caring and cooking for her active children. Four months ago, on the way home from work, Son was in a motor vehicle collision. She injured her left shoulder and received a hard blow to the face, fracturing her left orbital bones. Her family took her to a government hospital to repair the bones surrounding her eye. The traumatic injury also damaged the muscle and nerve function of her shoulder, which was not repaired. This is a devastating injury for their young family, as it can cause a significant loss of function and ability to perform tasks of daily living. Son has been diagnosed with a brachial plexus injury on her left side. The brachial plexus is a nerve network that transmits signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Injuries to this nerve network can result in loss of function and sensation. She has pain and is unable to lift her left arm. She cannot work in construction or manage her household, which has also been very hard for her husband. Son traveled to our medical partner's care center to receive treatment. This is the only center in the whole country where this treatment is available. On October 17th, she will undergo a brachial plexus repair surgery. After recovery, she hopes that her arm will be functional and she can work, do housework, and care for her children. Our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre, is requesting $709 to fund this procedure. She says: "After surgery, I hope I can use my left arm. This treatment will help me in the future to return to work."

73% funded

73%funded
$519raised
$190to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Night

Meet Night, a jovial and playful five year old girl. Night lives with her parents and two younger siblings in a traditional home in Kenya. Her father works selling second hand clothing, while her mother stays home to take care of the children. Shortly after she was born, Night's parents realized that something seemed wrong. They brought Night to a health facility in Turkana County where they lived, and were referred on to BethanyKids Hospital. There she was diagnosed with hydrocephalus, which meant that fluid was collecting in her head. Surgery was performed, and a shunt was placed to continuously drain the fluid from Night's head. A year later, however, Night's head began to increase in size, and she developed weakness on the right side of her body. The doctors at the local health facility urged Night's parents to take her back to BethanyKids Hospital for additional treatment, but Night's parents didn't have enough money to do this. With the help of our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, Night is now scheduled to undergo a craniotomy on January 5th at BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital, when surgeons will drain excess fluids from Night's brain. Night's father is providing as much of a co-pay as possible for this procedure, but the family needs your help to raise the remaining $1,500 required to cover all of the costs of Night's surgery and care. Night’s father said: “Night is not able to communicate well because of her condition. This surgery will help her to be able to speak.”

51% funded

51%funded
$771raised
$729to go