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Success! Naw Say from Thailand raised $1,500 to fund a safe c-section delivery for her new baby.

Naw Say
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Naw Say's treatment was fully funded on January 31, 2022.

Photo of Naw Say post-operation

April 28, 2022

Naw Say underwent a safe c-section delivery for her new baby.

Both Naw Say and her baby are doing well! She finished taking her maternity leave and she already returned to her work helping students at school with final exams. Now, she is having school holiday and she gets to spend time with her new baby.

Naw Say said, “I love being a teacher even though I receive very little stipend. If I have to pay for my operation cost, I will never make it and if there are no donors for me, I can’t imagine how my delivery would turn out. I am so happy to have a lovely baby and now she started to talk and make sounds. Thank you to everyone who helped me even though I never get to meet you in person.”

Both Naw Say and her baby are doing well! She finished taking her maternity leave and she already returned to her work helping students at s...

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January 11, 2022

Naw Say is a 33-year-old woman who lives with her husband and daughter in a refugee camp on the border area of Thailand. Naw Say is a teacher in the refugee camp while her husband looks after their daughter. During her free time, she loves to weave and embroider traditional Karen shirts.

Naw Say is currently expecting her second child. Her doctors recommend that she deliver via a caesarean section to ensure the safety of her and her baby. Malteser International staff - who help run the refugee camp - referred her to our medical partner’s Mae Sariang Hospital for care.

Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is helping Naw Say undergo a C-Section on January 12th. This procedure will cost $1500, and Naw Say needs your support.

Naw Say said, “I wanted a baby boy as my first child is a girl. However, I was told during the ultrasound that this baby is also a girl. When I told my husband about this, he said that another girl is good and that she will have friends to play with. We love her already.”

Naw Say is a 33-year-old woman who lives with her husband and daughter in a refugee camp on the border area of Thailand. Naw Say is a teache...

Read more

Naw Say's Timeline

  • January 11, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Naw Say was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • January 12, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Naw Say received treatment at Mae Sariang Hospital in Thailand. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • January 15, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Naw Say's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • January 31, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Naw Say's treatment was fully funded.

  • April 28, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Naw Say's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 20 donors

Funded by 20 donors

Treatment
Caesarean section (C-section)
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,873 for Naw Say's treatment
Subsidies fund $373 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$399
Medical Staff
$477
Medication
$4
Supplies
$770
Labs
$210
Radiology
$13
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The symptoms of complications during labour can include labour lasting longer then 20 hours for first time mothers or 14 hours for mothers who have given birth in the past, excessive bleeding, pregnancy-related high blood pressure, lack of oxygen supply to the baby during labour or the baby being in a breech position.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Some pregnant women will fall unconscious during labour due to the pain and/or excessive bleeding. Where an emergency C-section needs to be performed, both mother and baby can have loss of life if the C-section is not performed quickly enough.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

In villages and remote areas of Burma, where there are no clinics or hospital nearby, most women do not have the opportunity to receive prenatal care. They do not know whether the baby is in the right position and they do not know if they have high blood pressure or any underlying health condition that could affect their pregnancy and labour. They usually depend on traditional birth attendants, who often do not have any formal medical training. If there are complications during labour, many women and babies die because they cannot access treatment at a hospital or clinic fast enough. In refugee camps and in migrant communities in Thailand, most pregnant women are able to access basic prenatal care. During these visits, most pregnant women will be informed by a midwife, nurse or doctor if they will need to give birth via a C-section. Although some women are scared to undergo a C-section, they will usually follow the health workers recommendation if they are told it is because of an underlying condition or for the baby's safety. However, C-sections cannot be performed in refugee camps. If there are any complications during labour, the woman in labour has to be rushed to the nearest general hospital to undergo a C-section. Despite easier access to hospitals and clinics in migrant communities and refugee camps, women often opt to give birth at home with a traditional birth attendant because of potential negative experiences at hospital or clinics.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The physician will clean the abdomen of the mother. A tube (catheter) will likely be placed into the bladder to collect urine in a urine bag. An intravenous (IV) line will be placed in a vein in the mother's hand or arm to provide fluids and medication. Most cesarean sections are done under regional anesthesia, which numbs only the lower part of the body, allowing the mother to remain conscious during the procedure. Common choices include a spinal block and an epidural block. During an emergency C-section, general anesthesia is sometimes used, which means that the mother will not be awake to have skin-to-skin contact with the baby right after the birth. If both the mother and baby are healthy after delivery, they will need to stay at the hospital for 2-3 days. In some cases, if there are complications after the procedure, the mother will have to stay at the hospital for 7-10 days.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In most cases, without a C-section the mother and/or baby are at risk of loss of life. Undergoing a C-section therefore will usually save the mother and/or baby's lives.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Risk to the mother's health include infection inside the womb or at the opening site, postpartum hemorrhage or during the procedure, blood clots, splitting stitches, injury to the organs and/or blood vessels, reaction to anesthesia and the possible inability to deliver vaginally in the future. Risks to the baby include accidental injury during the C-section and temporary breathing problems after the birth.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

C-sections are performed in most district level hospitals in Thailand. However, it is very expensive and most migrants and refugees, without health insurance, cannot afford to pay for it.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There is no alternative to an emergency C-section without risking mother and baby's lives. However, it is still common practice to give birth at home with a traditional birth attendant amongst refugee and migrant communities in Thailand. During a home birth, a woman will first try to give birth vaginally. If there are complications, the woman will be rushed to a hospital or clinic for an emergency C-section.

Meet another patient you can support

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Eliana

Eliana is a friendly and talkative young girl from Tanzania. She is the firstborn child in a family of three. Her parents both work as small-scale farmers, and they depend entirely on what they harvest for their daily living. When Eliana was two years old, her parents noticed that her left leg was swelling up and that she would limp when walking. They initially thought she had fallen and hurt herself, so they took her to a local dispensary, where she was prescribed pain relieving medication. Eliana was eventually diagnosed with genu valgus, which is a malalignment of the knees. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, Eliana struggles to stand and cannot walk more than four steps without either experiencing pain or falling down. This has resulted in her having to crawl most of the time in order to move from one place to another. In 2020, Eliana had corrective osteotomy surgery, which fortunately helped correct her legs to a point where she can now enjoy walking and playing with other children. However, she requires a second-stage procedure in order to remove her implant so her condition can heal entirely. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Eliana. The procedure is scheduled to take place on August 11th. Treatment will allow Eliana's legs to completely heal, fully restoring her mobility, and greatly decreasing her risk of future complications. Eliana’s grandmother says, “The first surgery my granddaughter got helped ease her walking. I believe this next surgery will make her legs even better.’’

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30%funded
$265raised
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Abi

Abi is a one-year-old baby from Ethiopia who loves to play with his mother. His father serves in their church, and his mother is a homemaker. His parents share that their income is limited and only supports their basic day-to-day needs. Abi's parents also share that he was born prematurely, along with his twin sister, who unfortunately passed away after birth. Since birth, Abi has had a bilateral inguinal hernia, a condition that results from weakness in the abdominal wall, as well as hypospadias, which will need treatment in the future. The hernia causes him to experience irritability, pain, discomfort, and a reduced appetite. Despite his mother traveling to multiple different hospitals in attempts to have her son treated, he still has not received his much-needed hernia repair surgery due to his family's financial constraints. Fortunately, Abi will finally undergo hernia repair surgery on August 16th with the help of our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Now, AMHF is requesting $591 to fund Abi's surgery. Once completed, this procedure will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently. His mother shares, “We are having a hard time since the birth of Abi. He is suffering, and we couldn’t get him the treatment. I am always afraid of losing him, as I lost his twin sister. He can’t sit, and I am worried it’s because of his condition. He vomits the food I feed him. But since I got here, I have hope that he will get the treatment and heal. I hope he will sit and eat well after the surgery.”

1% funded

1%funded
$10raised
$581to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Eliana

Eliana is a friendly and talkative young girl from Tanzania. She is the firstborn child in a family of three. Her parents both work as small-scale farmers, and they depend entirely on what they harvest for their daily living. When Eliana was two years old, her parents noticed that her left leg was swelling up and that she would limp when walking. They initially thought she had fallen and hurt herself, so they took her to a local dispensary, where she was prescribed pain relieving medication. Eliana was eventually diagnosed with genu valgus, which is a malalignment of the knees. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, Eliana struggles to stand and cannot walk more than four steps without either experiencing pain or falling down. This has resulted in her having to crawl most of the time in order to move from one place to another. In 2020, Eliana had corrective osteotomy surgery, which fortunately helped correct her legs to a point where she can now enjoy walking and playing with other children. However, she requires a second-stage procedure in order to remove her implant so her condition can heal entirely. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Eliana. The procedure is scheduled to take place on August 11th. Treatment will allow Eliana's legs to completely heal, fully restoring her mobility, and greatly decreasing her risk of future complications. Eliana’s grandmother says, “The first surgery my granddaughter got helped ease her walking. I believe this next surgery will make her legs even better.’’

30% funded

30%funded
$265raised
$615to go