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Success! Morn from Cambodia raised $273 to fund a debridement procedure to heal a hand fracture.

Morn
100%
  • $273 raised, $0 to go
$273
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Morn's treatment was fully funded on June 10, 2021.

Photo of Morn post-operation

April 12, 2021

Morn underwent a debridement procedure to heal a hand fracture.

Morn’s surgery was successful, and he will keep his hand in a cast until the site heals. He will begin work with the physical therapy team so that when his finger heals completely, he will have full range of motion and strength. Soon, Morn will be able to use his hand and return to working as a motorbike taxi driver. The surgical team is looking forward to witnessing his healing and improvements.

Morn shared, “I am so happy I was able to get my hand fixed. I will return to work and support my family again.”

Morn's surgery was successful, and he will keep his hand in a cast until the site heals. He will begin work with the physical therapy team s...

Read more
March 31, 2021

Morn is a 52-year-old motorbike taxi driver. He has one son, six daughters, and seven grandchildren. Morn also does rice farming in the rainy season. In his free time, he enjoys listening to the radio, watching TV, and spending time with his grandchildren.

Morn got into a motorbike accident today on his way home that caused an open fracture of his right hand. After the accident, he came straight to Children’s Surgical Centre for treatment. He cannot move his fingers and is in severe pain.

On March 31st, surgeons at Children’s Surgical Centre will perform a debridement procedure to thoroughly clean the wound and remove all debris and damaged tissue. Surgeons will also affix a k-wire to heal the fracture. Now, Morn needs help to fund this $273 procedure.

Morn shared, “I am thankful for surgery and hope I can heal and return to my work without pain or limitations.”

Morn is a 52-year-old motorbike taxi driver. He has one son, six daughters, and seven grandchildren. Morn also does rice farming in the rain...

Read more

Morn's Timeline

  • March 31, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Morn was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • March 31, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Morn received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • April 2, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Morn's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • April 12, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Morn's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • June 10, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    Morn's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 9 donors

Funded by 9 donors

Treatment
Debridement
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $273 for Morn's treatment
Hospital Fees
$65
Medical Staff
$160
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A variety of injuries related to extensive skin loss and the cause of wounds can necessitate a debridement procedure. These include large open wounds, infection, and third degree burns.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients who have injuries that are in need of a debridement are in compromised health and at risk of infection from bacteria or viruses entering through the open wound.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Road traffic accidents—particularly with motorcycles—and hot water or fire burns are common causes of injuries in Cambodia and can often result in surgeries that involve debridement.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Debridement is done using scalpels, forceps, scissors and other instruments for large wounds that have deep tissue damage. First, the skin surrounding the wound is cleaned and disinfected. After determining the depth of the wound, the dead tissue is cut away and the wound is washed out to remove any free tissue. It may take the wound many weeks to heal. However, following a debridement procedure, patients will remain at the hospital for only one week for follow-up care.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

By removing unhealthy tissue from a wound, the wound is able to heal more easily and it reduces the patient’s risk of disease-causing bacteria or viruses entering the body, improving the overall health of the patient.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Debridement procedures come with minor possible complications that include pain, bleeding, infection, and delayed healing.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Severe injuries in need of debridement procedures require surgical operation; affordable surgical care is not very accessible, and so patients travel as much as twelve hours to reach Children's Surgical Centre for free surgery, arriving by bus, motorbike, or taxi.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Alternatives to surgical debridement include chemical debridement (applying a debriding medication to the wound), mechanical debridement (involves a whirlpool bath, a syringe and catheter or wet to dry dressings), and autolytic debridement (involves dressings that retain wound fluids and assist in the body’s natural abilities to clean the wound). However, these alternatives are not as effective as surgical debridement in treating severe wounds.

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Dar

Dar is a 21-day-old baby girl who lives with her parents and her brother in a village in the border area of Karen State in Burma. Dar was born at home with the help of a traditional birth attendant. Two days after she was born, Dar's mother noticed a problem when Dar was passing stool. She told Dar’s father to call a medic from the clinic to their home. The medic realized that Dar was born with a anorectal condition and shared with Dar’s mother that baby Dar would urgently need surgery to receive a colostomy. Dar’s parents are subsistence farmers who grow rice and raise chickens. They also forage for vegetables in the jungle and go fishing when they want to eat fish. To purchase staples that they cannot produce such as salt and oil, Dar’s father works as an agricultural day labourer during the rainy season. However, since the rainy season has not yet begun, they currently have no income. However, their daily needs are fulfilled from living off the land. If they are sick and need to seek treatment, they go to the free clinic in their village run by Burma Medical Association (BMA). Fortunately our medical partner Burma Children Medical Fund is helping Dar's family access the medical care she needs. They need help raising $1,500 to fund the treatment she needs. “We had to borrow money so far for Dar’s treatment and my husband cannot work,” said Dar’s mother. “I want to send my baby to school until she graduates so that she can become educated. I want this for her future because I only went to school until grade four. After she completes her studies, she can become whatever she wants one day.”

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$110to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Davis

Davis is a bright young man from Uganda. He is the thirdborn in a family of five children, all ranging in age from 15 to 30. His parents are small-scale farmers, and they own a three-room mud house for shelter. Davis completed secondary school class four, but he did not proceed because he wanted to prioritize and take care of his health before returning to his studies. For over five years, Davis has dealt with a right inguinal hernia. The hernia started as a small, painless swelling, but it has progressively increased in size. His parents initially were not concerned because Davis continued with his home duties per usual and was still very active. However, due to the swelling's noticeable increase in size, Davis has become very worried about the health complications his hernia can cause if it is not treated promptly. If left untreated, not only will the growth continue to grow, but he will also be at risk of strangulation and intestinal obstruction. Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo hernia repair surgery at our medical partner's care center on August 13th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $170 to fund Davis's surgery. Once completed, this procedure will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently. Davis says, “I want and hope to live a normal life again through surgery and be able to take my studies to a higher level. I want to become a strong and educated man in future who is able to help others.”

0% funded

0%funded
$0raised
$170to go