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Success! Ruth from Kenya raised $1,286 to fund clubfoot treatment.

Ruth
100%
  • $1,286 raised, $0 to go
$1,286
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Ruth's treatment was fully funded on January 7, 2021.

Photo of Ruth post-operation

January 7, 2021

Ruth underwent clubfoot treatment.

Ruth underwent treatment for her right achilles tendon lengthening surgery and it was successful! The surgery will be of great impact to her because it will improve her mobility, her self-esteem, and will enhance her ability to socialize with her peers both in school and at home.

“All we can say is thank you and don’t give up in doing good,” Sr Catherine of Limuru Cheshire home told us.

Ruth underwent treatment for her right achilles tendon lengthening surgery and it was successful! The surgery will be of great impact to her...

Read more
October 11, 2020

Ruth is a 15-year-old from Kenya who has special needs. She is a student at Limuru Cheshire Home (a center for girls with physical/mental disabilities) and was admitted to the institute in 2019. She was born into a family of two, being the firstborn followed by a brother who lives with her aunt. Her mother, who was a single mom, died when Ruth and her brother were young. This led to the two being separated and since Ruth is more vulnerable, she was left under the care of their grandmother. Together they live in a two-roomed house and they depend on the local community for upkeep.

Life has become more difficult now that Ruth’s grandmother cannot move around even for firewood since she has to ensure Ruth’s safety. Ruth has clubfoot that makes her walking extremely difficult. Last year she was brought to Watsi’s Medical Partner Care Center CURE Hospital, where she was recommended for surgery. Since her grandmother cannot afford the treatment, her surgery has not yet taken place. The surgery would highly enhance Ruth’s mobility as well as improve her self-esteem and ability to socialize with her peers.

Fortunately, surgeons at our partner hospital will perform clubfoot repair surgery on October 12th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,286 to fund Ruth’s clubfoot repair. After treatment, she will be able to walk easily.

“I will appreciate any kind of support give to make my granddaughter walk comfortably,” Ruth’s grandmother told us.

Ruth is a 15-year-old from Kenya who has special needs. She is a student at Limuru Cheshire Home (a center for girls with physical/mental di...

Read more

Ruth's Timeline

  • October 11, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Ruth was submitted by Robert Kariuki, Process Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • October 12, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Ruth's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • October 14, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Ruth received treatment at AIC Cure International Hospital in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • January 7, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    Ruth's treatment was fully funded.

  • January 7, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Ruth's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Treatment
Club Foot Correction
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,286 for Ruth's treatment
Hospital Fees
$273
Medical Staff
$313
Medication
$179
Supplies
$396
Labs
$37
Radiology
$27
Other
$61
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The foot is turned inward, often severely, at the ankle, and the arch of the foot is very high. Patients experience discomfort, and the affected leg may be shorter and smaller than the other.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

These children have a difficult time walking and running. Years of trying to walk on a clubfoot will cause wounds and other skeletal problems, such as arthritis. Patients will have difficulty fitting in shoes and participating in normal play, school, and daily activities. Many Africans make their livings through manual labor, which can be difficult with an untreated clubfoot.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Incidence is 1/1,000 live births in Kenya. This is roughly similar to rates in Western countries, though many cases may be missed. There is no known reason for its occurrence in this region.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Patients will undergo a series of small operations, casting, and manipulations during their course of treatment.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The bones and joint will become aligned, and long-term disability will be prevented.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Clubfoot is very treatable. The surgery is minor and not risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Care is not easily accessible. AIC Cure International Hospital is one of the few pediatric orthopedic hospitals devoted to serving the physically disabled children of Kenya. Most parents bring their children from remote areas to seek treatment.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If not treated, the condition will persist and will result in disability.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Paw

Paw is a 59-year-old woman who lives with her husband, son, daughter-in-law and two granddaughters in a refugee camp. In her free time, Paw like to feed her three chickens and sing gospel songs. She also loves looking after her granddaughters at home when their mother is teaching. On a late evening earlier this month, Paw was walking home in the rain when she slipped and fell on the muddy road. She accidentally hit her forehead against a tree stump and tried to break her fall by sticking out her right arm. Right after she fell, Paw experienced a sharp pain in her right arm and forehead. Her son and daughter-in-law brought her to the camp hospital, where Paw was given stitches for her forehead as well as pain medication, and her arm was put in a splint and a sling. The medic then referred her to another hospital, where she was finally admitted at two days later when a car became available to take her. At the hospital, Paw received a X-Ray and was told that her right wrist is broken and requires surgery. With her hand wrapped in a bandage, she was referred to our medical partner's care center, Chiang Mai Hospital, for further treatment. Currently, Paw cannot move her right wrist, not even to lift her hand. Without more pain medication, her hand and forearm experience severe pain with any movement, so Paw has to be careful to keep her right hand straight. Because of this, Paw cannot complete her daily chores nor look after her grandchildren. Fortunately, with the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Paw will undergo surgery to reset her fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for July 23rd and will cost $1,500. This surgery will help Paw move her hand around and resume her daily activities again with ease. “I want to get well soon so that I can go back to taking care of my grandchildren,” Paw said. “They are waiting for me at home to go back to my daily life. Now, I have to come for my treatment and there's nobody look after them. It is hard for my daughter in-law.”

82% funded

82%funded
$1,238raised
$262to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.