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Success! Odilla from Guatemala raised $367 for arthritis medication.

Odilla
100%
  • $367 raised, $0 to go
$367
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Odilla's treatment was fully funded on April 21, 2016.

Photo of Odilla post-operation

July 12, 2016

Odilla received arthritis medication and treatment.

Odilla’s first months of treatment have been going great. She has tolerated the medications and her pain and swelling have gone down. She now can walk better, since her arthritis is now well-controlled for the first time in her life. She is no longer as worried as she was before about providing for her son, since she now knows she has medical support. She is excited to be able to continue making traditional textiles to sell and support her son.

“I feel better now that my condition is more controlled,” Odilla shared. “Now I don’t suffer from lots of pain. Now I can support my son.”

Odilla's first months of treatment have been going great. She has tolerated the medications and her pain and swelling have gone down. She no...

Read more
April 8, 2016

34-year-old Odilla has had rheumatoid arthritis for eleven years. She normally relies on anti-inflammatories and painkillers to keep her swelling down and her discomfort at bay.

After her partner left her recently, Odilla lost one of her family’s key income sources, and now spends what little money she comes by on her ten-year-old son’s basic needs.

“Odilla does not have the money to provide her son with an education as well as buy herself medication, so she has not been taking her medication,” explains our medical partner, Wuqu’ Kawoq.

Without her medication, “Odilla gets severe flare-ups in her hands and her left knee every couple weeks,” says Wuqu’ Kawoq. “When that happens, her knee gets red, swollen and infected, and makes it hard for her to walk around the rural mountainous community in Guatemala that she lives in.” Her arthritis also makes her hand so inflamed that “she has a hard time weaving textiles, which is her primary form of income.”

But with our help, Odilla will not longer have to choose between her son’s well-being and her own. For $367, our medical partner will provide Odilla with a four-month supply of the anti-inflammatory and painkiller medications she needs in order to keep her arthritis under control. This sum will also pay for lab tests so doctors can monitor her progression.

“I want to see my son grow, and be able to educate him in a better way,” shares Odilla. “I also want my pain to go away.”

34-year-old Odilla has had rheumatoid arthritis for eleven years. She normally relies on anti-inflammatories and painkillers to keep her swe...

Read more

Odilla's Timeline

  • April 8, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Odilla was submitted by Jessica Hawkins at Wuqu’ Kawoq.

  • April 21, 2016
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Odilla received treatment at Clinic Panajachel in Guatemala. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • April 21, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Odilla's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • April 21, 2016
    FULLY FUNDED

    Odilla's treatment was fully funded.

  • July 12, 2016
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Odilla's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 1 donor

Profile 48x48 12662003 10102257901823442 6205583651790615419 n

Funded by 1 donor

Profile 48x48 12662003 10102257901823442 6205583651790615419 n
Treatment
Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other related autoimmune diseases experience tender and swollen joints, joint stiffness that is usually worse in the mornings and after inactivity, fatigue, fever, weight loss, bone damage, and skin and tissue damage.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Living with rheumatoid arthritis and other related autoimmune diseases is highly uncomfortable. It often affects young people (usually women) who are working or just starting to raise children. Rheumatoid arthritis can make it difficult for patients to work. If untreated, as it usually is in Guatemala, it can lead to permanent disability.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the more common conditions that our medical partner sees. People come to Wuqu' Kawoq from all over the country for help.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The intensive phase of the treatment lasts about two to three months. Staff at our medical partner perform specialized lab work to verify the diagnosis and to quantify the extent of the damage. After that, they work with specialists (often from the United States) to provide immunosuppressive medications to patients to reduce inflammation and pain. Usually within six weeks, patients are much better and can get back to their lives. Our medical partner continues to see them as long as they want, providing support and followup. If the patient lives a long way away, staff write a letter detailing the treatment plan and medication regimen so that the patient can work with his or her local doctor.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The typical patient arrives in severe pain and walks out pain-free. His or her life is improved immeasurably, as are the lives of his or her dependents.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This condition is very treatable. Treatment is predictable and algorithmic. Not all patients will recover completely, as some will still experience stiffness or pain. However, all patients will experience a remarkable improvement in function and quality of life.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

The medications and tests required for treatment are highly specialized. Most health centers in Guatemala cannot provide this level of care.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives to treatment. With time, patients who do not receive treatment gradually become more disabled.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.