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Success! Henry from Uganda raised $358 to fund a fracture repair.

Henry
100%
  • $358 raised, $0 to go
$358
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Henry's treatment was fully funded on May 28, 2017.

Photo of Henry post-operation

March 9, 2017

Henry underwent fracture repair.

Henry has been discharged from the hospital and is back home to complete his recovery. Even though he lost one finger in the accident, he should have full use of his hand once his bones completely heal. He can continue his forestry work.

“I am so grateful for the help,” says Henry. “Without this help, I might have had to sell some of my land, which I use to support my family. Thank you so much.”

Henry has been discharged from the hospital and is back home to complete his recovery. Even though he lost one finger in the accident, he sh...

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February 8, 2017

Henry is a 54-year-old father of six from Uganda. He grows trees for a living, and he enjoys listening to news radio and teaching his community about afforestation in his free time.

One day, on his way home from the nursery site, Henry was riding his bicycle when he was hit by a speeding vehicle. From the accident, he was knocked unconscious, lost a finger, and sustained carpal fractures in his hand.

On February 8, Henry will undergo surgery to reset his fractured hand at our medical partner’s care center, Bwindi Community Hospital. Our medical partner, The Kellermann Foundation, is asking for $358 to fund his surgery, medical supplies, and medications.

After recovering from his fracture, Henry hopes to continue growing trees and selling the seedlings in his community.

“I thank the people that are donating toward my care. May God bless you so much,” says Henry.

Henry is a 54-year-old father of six from Uganda. He grows trees for a living, and he enjoys listening to news radio and teaching his commun...

Read more

Henry's Timeline

  • February 8, 2017
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Henry was submitted by Barnabas Oyesiga, Communications Officer at The Kellermann Foundation.

  • February 8, 2017
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Henry received treatment at Bwindi Community Hospital in Uganda. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • February 8, 2017
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Henry's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • March 9, 2017
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Henry's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • May 28, 2017
    FULLY FUNDED

    Henry's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 10 donors

Funded by 10 donors

Treatment
Fracture - Open
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $358 for Henry's treatment
Hospital Fees
$162
Medical Staff
$17
Medication
$69
Supplies
$74
Labs
$36
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients present with open fractures of the limbs. In an open fracture, the fractured bone breaks through the soft tissue and skin. Patients are usually in a lot of pain. Depending on the location of the fracture, they may not be able to stand, walk, or use the affected limb. The limb may be distorted, and there may be swelling or bruising around the site of the break. Bone will be protruding through the skin.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Both open and closed fractures impact a patient's ability to work and complete normal daily activities. A patient may be prevented from going to school, performing daily household activities, or helping the family. If not treated promptly and properly, open fractures can lead to bone infections, or osteomyelitis. The long-term consequences of osteomyelitis are very serious and can even lead to death of the bone and possible amputation.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

There is no special cultural significance to this injury.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Cleaning the area of the injury is the first step. Infection caused by debris and dirt can travel from the break in the skin to the fracture location and lead to infection in the bone. Once an infection is established, it can be a difficult problem to solve. After cleaning the wound, an x-ray will be taken of the injury. The patient will then be scheduled for surgery. An anesthetist will review the patient for antibiotics and pain management. During surgery, the fracture will be set into the normal position through the open reduction method. Plaster of Paris will be applied as a cast. The patient might also receive a tetanus shot. The patient will remain in the hospital approximately seven days to ensure the wound is healing properly. After discharge, the patient will return home for approximately a month. Then, the cast will be removed. The patient will continue to rest at home until the fracture is completely healed.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Prompt and proper treatment of open fractures can prevent both serious infections and the need for further surgery due to malunion or nonunion of the bones. If infection of the bone occurs, treatment often requires multiple surgeries and prolonged antibiotic use.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

For open fractures in particular, the risk of non-union is high. The patient will face a poorer prognosis if there is a significant delay before hospital treatment. Patients with open fractures are still highly susceptible to bone infections, even with treatment.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Proper care for patients with open fractures is only available at hospitals. Patients may receive first aid, in the form of splints and slings, before they reach the hospital. The only other hospital is more than a two-hour drive away.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives to having the fracture set and treated properly. Many people cannot afford to go to the hospital and will attempt to treat the injury at home or at a lower-level health facility. This often results in improperly healed fractures and bone infections.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.