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Success! Seyha from Cambodia raised $220 to fund a mass removal procedure.

Seyha
100%
  • $220 raised, $0 to go
$220
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Seyha's treatment was fully funded on June 27, 2019.

Photo of Seyha post-operation

June 19, 2019

Seyha underwent a mass removal procedure.

Seyha’s operation went well. Surgery will improve his quality of life by eliminating pain and discomfort. He will be able to sleep well at night again and can breathe without disruption.

Seyha's operation went well. Surgery will improve his quality of life by eliminating pain and discomfort. He will be able to sleep well at n...

Read more
June 14, 2019

Seyha is a 14-month-old boy from Cambodia. He is an only child from Kampong Cham province.

Since he was three months old, Seyha has had a mass in his right nostril that continues to swell in size. He experiences pain, itchiness, and difficulty breathing.

Seyha traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On June 14, surgeons at our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre (CSC), will remove the mass. Now, Seyha needs help to raise $220 to fund this procedure.

His mother says, “I hope that after surgery, my son’s condition will improve and I will no longer have to worry about it.”

Seyha is a 14-month-old boy from Cambodia. He is an only child from Kampong Cham province. Since he was three months old, Seyha has had a...

Read more

Seyha's Timeline

  • June 14, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Seyha was submitted by Lindsay Bownik, Stakeholder Relations Officer at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • June 14, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Seyha received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • June 14, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Seyha's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • June 19, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Seyha's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • June 27, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Seyha's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 2 donors

Funded by 2 donors

Treatment
Remove FB / Cyst / Lesion / Mass
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $220 for Seyha's treatment
Hospital Fees
$34
Medical Staff
$88
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
Labs
$3
Radiology
$55
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients will present with a growing mass. Depending on its location, the mass may cause pain and difficulty breathing or swallowing. Foreign bodies include shrapnel and other objects that do not belong in the human body. Masses, cysts, and tumors are abnormal tissue growths.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Disturbances from foreign bodies/masses/cysts/tumors can be cosmetic, limit function, cause pain, and damage internal organs.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Foreign bodies, such as shrapnel from landmines, are more common in Cambodia than the United States, especially in rural areas. It is estimated that there may be as many as four to six million mines and other pieces of unexploded ordnance in Cambodia.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

If the foreign body/mass/cyst/tumor is superficial, the removal procedure can be done under local anesthesia. Removal of deeper objects or large tumors requires general anesthesia.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This treatment improves a patient's appearance and function, reduces pain, and limits risk of damage to other body parts.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Risks are minor but depend on the site, size, and aggressiveness of the foreign body/mass/cyst/tumor.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Simple removal procedures can be done at local district or provincial hospitals, but patients must pay. Patients come to CSC because they cannot afford the procedure at their local hospital.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

For most masses, there are no alternatives. For aggressive tumors, patients may undergo chemotherapy or radiotherapy to reduce the tumor.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Mu

Mu lives with her four nieces and nephew in a refugee camp along the Thai/Burma border region. One of her nieces is a medic, the other a teacher, and the two youngest go to school with her nephew. Mu is unemployed and in her free time she enjoys gardening and reading the Bible. In 2019, Mu started to suffer from abdominal pain, back pain, and exhaustion. When she touched her lower abdomen, she could feel a mass. After the International Rescue Committee (IRC) helped her undergo medical investigations at multiple hospitals, she was diagnosed with bilateral endometriosis cysts and was told she has cysts outside of her uterus. Although she needed surgery, she was told she would have to wait because all surgeries had stopped due to the outbreak of COVID-19 in Thailand. In September, she had an ultrasound which showed that she had one new cyst. The doctor said she would need surgery soon but Mu could not go back to Mae Sot Hospital for the next few months because more COVID-19 cases in the refugee camp caused a lockdown. When she was finally able to go to the hospital this month, doctors have scheduled her for surgery to remove her cysts. With Mu unable to pay for the procedure, IRC referred her to our medical partner Burma Children Medical Fund for financial assistance to raise $1,500 that is needed for her treatment. "I felt like half of my worries disappeared when I heard that I could have surgery with the support of donors," said Mu. "I have waited so long to receive surgery and my condition is so painful. I would like to say thank you so much to everyone who is helping me."

79% funded

79%funded
$1,188raised
$311to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Mu

Mu lives with her four nieces and nephew in a refugee camp along the Thai/Burma border region. One of her nieces is a medic, the other a teacher, and the two youngest go to school with her nephew. Mu is unemployed and in her free time she enjoys gardening and reading the Bible. In 2019, Mu started to suffer from abdominal pain, back pain, and exhaustion. When she touched her lower abdomen, she could feel a mass. After the International Rescue Committee (IRC) helped her undergo medical investigations at multiple hospitals, she was diagnosed with bilateral endometriosis cysts and was told she has cysts outside of her uterus. Although she needed surgery, she was told she would have to wait because all surgeries had stopped due to the outbreak of COVID-19 in Thailand. In September, she had an ultrasound which showed that she had one new cyst. The doctor said she would need surgery soon but Mu could not go back to Mae Sot Hospital for the next few months because more COVID-19 cases in the refugee camp caused a lockdown. When she was finally able to go to the hospital this month, doctors have scheduled her for surgery to remove her cysts. With Mu unable to pay for the procedure, IRC referred her to our medical partner Burma Children Medical Fund for financial assistance to raise $1,500 that is needed for her treatment. "I felt like half of my worries disappeared when I heard that I could have surgery with the support of donors," said Mu. "I have waited so long to receive surgery and my condition is so painful. I would like to say thank you so much to everyone who is helping me."

79% funded

79%funded
$1,188raised
$311to go