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Success! Oudam from Cambodia raised $487 to fund surgery to heal the damage to his arm from a burn.

Oudam
100%
  • $487 raised, $0 to go
$487
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Oudam's treatment was fully funded on November 29, 2022.

Photo of Oudam post-operation

December 17, 2022

Oudam underwent surgery to heal the damage to his arm from a burn.

Surgeons successfully cleaned Oudams’s burn scars and performed a nerve graft to repair the damaged skin around his elbow. He spent several days in the hospital until surgeons were assured his graft was successful. His elbow was covered with a sterile dressing until it connected with the surrounding blood supply, and he received antibiotics to protect it from infection.

After a week, Oudam was able to return to his family. He and his aunt worked with the physiotherapy team for rehabilitative exercises to prevent stiffness and strengthen the muscles as he continues to recover. After his skin has healed, Oudam will be able to perform daily activities again, like eating and returning to school. He is happy he will be able to move his arm and won’t be in pain.

Oudam’s aunt said: “We are relieved the burns my nephew suffered can be fixed. He can grow up like other children and use his arm normally. Thank you to the staff who helped him, and to the strangers who helped to pay for his surgery and recovery. We will always be grateful.”

Surgeons successfully cleaned Oudams's burn scars and performed a nerve graft to repair the damaged skin around his elbow. He spent several ...

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October 17, 2022

Oudam is a 9-year-old student who enjoys math and wants to be a policeman when he is older. Oudam has two older siblings, a 15-year-old brother, and a 16-year-old sister. At home, his favorite meal is soup and fried vegetables.

Three months ago, his mother died from an acid burn assault, which was very traumatic for him as he was also splashed with some of the acid. After their mother’s death, the three children moved in with their aunt, who now supports them. The acid burned Oudam’s body and his right arm. His aunt took him to the local charity hospital for wound care, but he has developed scar contractures and an open wound on his right elbow. It is painful and difficult for him to bend his elbow and to use his right arm due to the burn scars and a chronic wound. He feels ashamed about how his skin looks and doesn’t want to attend school.

When Oudam’s family learned about our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, he traveled with his aunt for two and a half hours seeking treatment. On October 17th, surgeons at CSC will perform a procedure to remove the injured tissue and replace it with a skin graft to allow his elbow to heal. He will be able to flex and straighten his arm and to eventually have full use of his arm. Now, his family needs help to fund this $487 procedure.

Oudam’s aunt said: “We hope the doctors can repair Oudam’s damaged skin and he can use his arm again. He would like to ride his bike and play with his friends again.”

Oudam is a 9-year-old student who enjoys math and wants to be a policeman when he is older. Oudam has two older siblings, a 15-year-old brot...

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Oudam's Timeline

  • October 17, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Oudam was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • October 17, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Oudam received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • October 19, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Oudam's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • November 29, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Oudam's treatment was fully funded.

  • December 17, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Oudam's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 6 donors

Funded by 6 donors

Treatment
Skin Graft
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $487 for Oudam's treatment
Hospital Fees
$126
Medical Staff
$310
Medication
$0
Supplies
$43
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A variety of injuries related to extensive skin loss can necessitate a skin graft. These include large open wounds, infection, and third degree burns. Additionally, surgeries such as removal of skin cancers require skin grafts to heal.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients who have injuries that are in need of a skin graft are in compromised health and at risk of infection from bacteria or viruses entering through the open wound.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Road traffic accidents— particularly with motorcycles—are a common cause of injuries in Cambodia and can often result in surgeries that involve a skin graft. The use of open stoves additionally can increase risk of burns, especially in children.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Skin grafting involves covering the affected area with healthy skin from a donor site. In a split-thickness skin graft, the top two layers of the donor skin, or the graft, are transplanted and attached by staples or stitches, and the donor-area is covered with a dressing. For injuries with deeper tissue loss, a full-thickness skin graft may be used, which transplants a full flap of skin, including the muscles and blood supply, and is a more complicated procedure. Prior to the skin transfer, debridement may be needed to remove dead or damaged skin. Following a skin graft surgery, patients will remain at the hospital for 1-2 weeks for follow-up care.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

By replacing damaged or missing skin with a skin graft, the patient’s risk of disease-causing bacteria or viruses entering the body are decreased; the graft also aids in fluid loss prevention and temperature regulation, improving the overall health of the patient.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

One risk of skin grafting is graft failure, caused commonly by blood collecting in the tissues, which necessitates a repeat graft. Other risks include infection, chronic pain, and wound contracture. Potential side effects are scarring, skin discoloration, or reduced skin sensation.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Injuries in need of skin grafts require surgical operation; affordable surgical care is not very accessible, and so patients travel as much as twelve hours to reach Children's Surgical Centre for free surgery, arriving by bus, motorbike, or taxi.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

The skin grafts performed at Children’s Surgical Centre are autographs, or grafts of the patient’s own skin. Alternatives to this include artificial skin grafts, which are used when patients do not have enough skin to cover the exposed area.

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Myo

Myo is a 14-year-old boy from Burma. He lives with his parents in a village in Karen State. His mother is a homemaker who is currently eight months pregnant. His father is a subsistence farmer, but he also works as a day laborer to earn money. Myo is in grade six and he enjoys playing football in his free time. Two years ago, Myo developed a pain in his arm which he noticed while playing football with his friends. Right away he was in a lot of pain, but his arm did not look broken. At first, the pain lessened, but gradually the pain worsened and his upper left forearm became swollen. Myo could also feel a mass under the swollen area of his left forearm. Myo and his father went to Chiang Mai Hospital, where he received a MRI and other tests, as well as a biopsy which confirmed that the tumor in his forearm was cancer. Now he needs surgery to remove the tumor, and he will need a chemo after surgery. The enlarged mass in Myo's left forearm has not increased in size, and only causes him pain when he lifts something heavy or when he does any physical activity with that arm such as washing his clothes or cleaning. Although he can take a shower by himself, using only his right arm makes it challenging. When he plays with his friends, he needs to protect his left forearm to prevent getting hurt. Myo's family sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund. He is now scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on December 8th, and his family needs help funding the $1,500 cost to cover his procedure and care. He said, “I feel sorry for my mother and I pity her that she has to stay alone with the new baby. I also feel sad that I cannot go to school this year. I want to recover quickly and go back to see my brother and mother.”

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77% funded

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Vanis

Vanis is a 60 year old small-scale farmer. She and her husband - who passed away in 2021 - had eleven children, of whom nine are still alive. Vanis had to leave school because of a lack of the fees necessary to remain in school, and of her children, only her youngest has been able to be educated. Over 20 years ago, Vanis began to experience troubling symptoms, including a small neck swelling that later started progressing in size. She initially thought it was a temporary condition, and resorted to using herbs, which did not help to relieve her symptoms. After delivering her first five children, she underwent a thyroidectomy, and she felt better. However, her symptoms recurred after she gave birth to six more children, and this time, the swelling was larger than it had ever been. She finds that she is unable to carry loads on her head, and she will occasionally experience difficulty breathing. Vanis has been diagnosed with a non-toxic, multinodular goiter, and she needs surgery to resolve her condition. Her family cannot afford to pay for her treatment, but our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, has stepped up to help Vanis access the care that she needs. They are requesting $333 to fund Vanis' procedure, which is scheduled to take place on December 3rd, at Rushoroza Hospital, and which will ensure that Vanis' symptoms do not get worse over time. Vanis says: “I pray that I may be considered for treatment so that I may live a normal life once again. I will continue with farming as soon as possible.”

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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Myo

Myo is a 14-year-old boy from Burma. He lives with his parents in a village in Karen State. His mother is a homemaker who is currently eight months pregnant. His father is a subsistence farmer, but he also works as a day laborer to earn money. Myo is in grade six and he enjoys playing football in his free time. Two years ago, Myo developed a pain in his arm which he noticed while playing football with his friends. Right away he was in a lot of pain, but his arm did not look broken. At first, the pain lessened, but gradually the pain worsened and his upper left forearm became swollen. Myo could also feel a mass under the swollen area of his left forearm. Myo and his father went to Chiang Mai Hospital, where he received a MRI and other tests, as well as a biopsy which confirmed that the tumor in his forearm was cancer. Now he needs surgery to remove the tumor, and he will need a chemo after surgery. The enlarged mass in Myo's left forearm has not increased in size, and only causes him pain when he lifts something heavy or when he does any physical activity with that arm such as washing his clothes or cleaning. Although he can take a shower by himself, using only his right arm makes it challenging. When he plays with his friends, he needs to protect his left forearm to prevent getting hurt. Myo's family sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund. He is now scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on December 8th, and his family needs help funding the $1,500 cost to cover his procedure and care. He said, “I feel sorry for my mother and I pity her that she has to stay alone with the new baby. I also feel sad that I cannot go to school this year. I want to recover quickly and go back to see my brother and mother.”

72% funded

72%funded
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