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Success! Eric from the Philippines raised $1,500 to fund bilateral clubfoot correction.

Eric
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Eric's treatment was fully funded on January 8, 2018.

Photo of Eric post-operation

September 28, 2017

Eric underwent bilateral clubfoot correction.

Surgery was successful. He can now walk comfortably and is already back at school.

His mother says, “We are greatly overwhelmed of this great blessing given to my son. We are happy that he is already well.Thank you so much for all the help you have given us.”

Surgery was successful. He can now walk comfortably and is already back at school. His mother says, "We are greatly overwhelmed of this ...

Read more
August 6, 2017

Eric is a nine-year-old student from the Philippines. He lives with his parents and three siblings. When he’s not in school, Eric helps his mother with household chores and likes to play with his friends in the neighborhood. Also, as the eldest of four, he is often put in charge of his younger siblings when his parents are not around.

Eric has difficulty walking because he was born with bilateral clubfoot. Clubfoot refers to the internal rotation of the feet and can only be corrected surgically.

In order to help Eric receive the treatment he needs, our medical partner, International Care Ministries, is requesting $1,500 to fund Eric’s surgery, hospital stay, and medication. He is scheduled to undergo clubfeet correction on August 8 at our medical partner’s care center, Tebow Cure Hospital. Surgeons will re-align the ligaments and tendons that are affected by his condition.

“We are looking for a very good result after the operation,” says Rowena, Eric’s mother. “Hopefully his both feet will be corrected after the operation and he will live a normal life.”

Eric is a nine-year-old student from the Philippines. He lives with his parents and three siblings. When he's not in school, Eric helps his ...

Read more

Eric's Timeline

  • August 6, 2017
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Eric was submitted by Krishiel Ferenal, National Health Officer at International Care Ministries.

  • August 8, 2017
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Eric received treatment at Tebow CURE Hospital in Davao in Philippines. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 28, 2017
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Eric's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • September 28, 2017
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Eric's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • January 8, 2018
    FULLY FUNDED

    Eric's treatment was fully funded.

Treatment
Bilateral Clubfoot Correction
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,564 for Eric's treatment
Subsidies fund $64 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$385
Medical Staff
$703
Medication
$171
Supplies
$0
Other
$305
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Clubfoot is a common congenital disorder of the lower limbs. It occurs when a foot and ankle are permanently twisted. The ligaments and tendons that hold the muscles to the bones are too tight, which causes the tissues around the ankle to hold the foot in an abnormal position. A clubfoot appears to be pointing downward and twisting inward. For an adult with an uncorrected clubfoot, only part of the foot touches the ground. Walking is difficult or impossible.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Neglected clubfoot has a long-term impact on a person's quality of life. Children from rural areas or low socioeconomic backgrounds lack access to adequate care or information. These children may face a life of disability due to untreated clubfoot.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

There is no historical, cultural, or regional significance to this condition or its treatment. Much of the abnormality can be corrected through manipulation and casting during the first three months of life. This treatment is not risky, but access to long-term orthopedic care is required to ensure that the correction is maintained. Exercises, corrective shoes, or nighttime splints may be needed until the child stops growing.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The orthopedic surgeon will first try to correct the clubfoot using nonsurgical methods. The patient's foot is gently stretched and manipulated into the correct position and held in place with a long-leg cast that stretches from the toes to the thigh. Each week for six to eight weeks, this process of stretching, re-positioning, and casting is repeated. After the manipulation and casting period, an Achilles tenotomy is performed. This is a minor procedure to release tightness in the Achilles tendon. A new cast will be applied to the leg to protect the tendon as it heals. By the time the cast is removed, the Achilles tendon will have regrown to a proper, longer length, and the clubfoot will be fully corrected. Many cases of clubfoot are successfully corrected with nonsurgical methods. Sometimes, however, the abnormality cannot be fully corrected, or it returns. Surgery may be needed to adjust the tendons, ligaments, and joints in the foot and ankle.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Quality of life is improved. Most individuals are able to wear regular shoes and lead active lives.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Children who undergo clubfoot repair surgery can lead active lives with few risks. In some cases, the foot and calf may remain smaller throughout the patient's life. Potential risks associated with this surgery also include nerve damage in the foot, excessive foot swelling, interrupted blood flow to the foot, and the formation of an ulcer from a cast that is too tight.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

This treatment is available in most tertiary hospitals. It is performed by experienced orthopedic surgeons who are specialists in the field.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There is no alternative treatment for this condition.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Dolla

Dolla is a 47-year-old woman who has been married for 25 years. She has four children between the ages of 19 and 24 years. Her first and second-born are in college and the last-born children are twins, currently in form 4 of school. Her husband works as a carpenter, while Dolla sells Thobwa drinks, freezers, and second-hand clothes. She shared that business is now slow due to the Covid-19 pandemic, so it is a hard time to earn money. Dolla started having difficulty swallowing 2 years ago. She went to a healthcare facility near her home where she was referred to a bigger facility for diagnosis. The healthcare givers there told her to avoid taking certain foods which might have been a result of her having a hard time swallowing food. After a year, she noticed swelling around her neck. She returned to the hospital and had an ultrasound which revealed an enlarged right side of her thyroid. It was diagnosed as goiter. A goiter is an abnormal enlargement of the thyroid gland; a butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of the neck. Although goiters are usually painless, a large goiter can cause a cough, irritation, and may also cause difficulty in swallowing and breathing. Dolla has been unable to eat well and constantly reports feeling like there is a foreign body in her throat. She is afraid of the goiter continuing to grow as she believes it may cause serious problems. She sought care at Partners In Hope Medical Center because she believes the surgery will prevent future complications and significantly improve her quality of life. Upon review at Partners in Hope, the surgeon confirmed a multi-nodular goiter and recommended a total thyroidectomy to remove it and heal her condition. It is expected that after the surgery the chronic sensation of choking and the feeling of having something ‘stuck’ in her throat will go away. This will allow her to eat and breathe without feeling uncomfortable. Dolla is not in a financial position to cater for surgery and is appealing for financial assistance. Dolla says, "I hope the surgery will prevent future complications and give me a chance to continue meeting my responsibilities as a parent like raising school fees for my children.”

57% funded

57%funded
$580raised
$435to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Dolla

Dolla is a 47-year-old woman who has been married for 25 years. She has four children between the ages of 19 and 24 years. Her first and second-born are in college and the last-born children are twins, currently in form 4 of school. Her husband works as a carpenter, while Dolla sells Thobwa drinks, freezers, and second-hand clothes. She shared that business is now slow due to the Covid-19 pandemic, so it is a hard time to earn money. Dolla started having difficulty swallowing 2 years ago. She went to a healthcare facility near her home where she was referred to a bigger facility for diagnosis. The healthcare givers there told her to avoid taking certain foods which might have been a result of her having a hard time swallowing food. After a year, she noticed swelling around her neck. She returned to the hospital and had an ultrasound which revealed an enlarged right side of her thyroid. It was diagnosed as goiter. A goiter is an abnormal enlargement of the thyroid gland; a butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of the neck. Although goiters are usually painless, a large goiter can cause a cough, irritation, and may also cause difficulty in swallowing and breathing. Dolla has been unable to eat well and constantly reports feeling like there is a foreign body in her throat. She is afraid of the goiter continuing to grow as she believes it may cause serious problems. She sought care at Partners In Hope Medical Center because she believes the surgery will prevent future complications and significantly improve her quality of life. Upon review at Partners in Hope, the surgeon confirmed a multi-nodular goiter and recommended a total thyroidectomy to remove it and heal her condition. It is expected that after the surgery the chronic sensation of choking and the feeling of having something ‘stuck’ in her throat will go away. This will allow her to eat and breathe without feeling uncomfortable. Dolla is not in a financial position to cater for surgery and is appealing for financial assistance. Dolla says, "I hope the surgery will prevent future complications and give me a chance to continue meeting my responsibilities as a parent like raising school fees for my children.”

57% funded

57%funded
$580raised
$435to go