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Success! Aung from Burma raised $1,500 to fund heart surgery.

Aung
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Aung's treatment was fully funded on December 21, 2019.

Photo of Aung post-operation

December 26, 2019

Aung underwent heart surgery.

Aung underwent cardiac surgery to treat an Atrial Septal Defect. Aung expressed that he does not get tired that easily anymore. He can walk longer distances and he can sleep better at night. Although he still has a poor appetite he is trying to eat as much as he can so that he will recover [from surgery] faster. Aung is looking forward to recovering fully. He wants to go back to work soon so that he can provide for his family.

Aung said, “I didn’t expect to receive surgery this quick. Actually, my mother did not agree when I told her I would come for surgery. She was worried and kept urging me to use alternative medicine. I had to explain to her about my need for it [surgery] to treat my condition. I also told her about the advanced technology they have at that hospital so that she wouldn’t worry too much about me. But now, she is very happy to learn that I’m doing better. My wife is also very happy. I can’t wait to go home and see my family again.”

Aung underwent cardiac surgery to treat an Atrial Septal Defect. Aung expressed that he does not get tired that easily anymore. He can walk ...

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September 12, 2019

Aung is a 30-year-old man from Burma. He lives with his wife, daughter and sister in an internally displaced persons (IDP) camp which is close to the Chinese-Burma border town of Lweje in Momauk Township, Kachin State. Today, his wife works as a mathematics teacher at a middle school in the IDP camp. His sister is a student in the IDP camp while his daughter is still too young to go to school. He used to work as a English teacher. Later on, he stopped working in June 2019 due to his poor health. feels exhausted and he is not able to walk for longer than 30 minutes, or he feels tired. His heartbeat is rapid, he has blue lips and sometimes he feels like he is not able to get enough oxygen. He has no appetite and he is not able to sleep well, worrying over his health condition, the cost of his surgery and his inability to access it.

Aung was born with ventricular septal defect, a cardiac condition in which a hole exists between the two lower chambers of the heart. Blood leaks through this hole without first passing through his lungs to obtain oxygen, leaving his sick and short of breath.

Aung is scheduled to undergo heart surgery on September 15th to correct his condition and improve his quality of life. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of Aung’s procedure and care.

Aung said, “Even if I could go someplace else, I wouldn’t be able to do any hard labour due to my condition. And I can’t go to China because I can only speak a little bit of Chinese.”

Aung is a 30-year-old man from Burma. He lives with his wife, daughter and sister in an internally displaced persons (IDP) camp which is clo...

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Aung's Timeline

  • September 12, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Aung was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund, our medical partner in Burma.

  • September 15, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Aung received treatment at Pinlon Private Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • September 22, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Aung's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • December 21, 2019
    FULLY FUNDED

    Aung's treatment was fully funded.

  • December 26, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Aung's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Treatment
Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD) Closure
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $4,381 for Aung's treatment
Subsidies fund $2,881 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$1,500
Medical Staff
$1,066
Medication
$0
Supplies
$1,700
Labs
$100
Radiology
$15
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients may experience excessive sweating, extreme tiredness and fatigue, irregular heartbeat, rapid breathing or shortness of breath, chest pain, cyanosis (a blue tinge to the skin), clubbed fingernails, lightheadedness, or loss of consciousness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients cannot do labor work—even doing household chores may tire them. Adults will be unable to care for their families, and children will be unable to play or attend school. As the condition progresses, patients may become unable to eat.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Burma has a long queue of congenital cardiac patients who need surgery. With only four fully trained cardiac surgeons in Burma, children with congenital heart defects may have extreme difficulty accessing treatment.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Doctors may combine catheter and surgical procedures to repair complex congenital heart defects. If the defect cannot be fixed with a catheter, the patient will undergo an open heart surgery to close holes in the heart.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery saves lives. Children will return to school, and adults will return to working and caring for their families.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include bleeding, infection, fever, swelling, inflammation, arrhythmias, damage to surrounding organs, stroke, and death. Heart surgery is more likely to be life-threatening for patients who are very sick before the surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many of our medical partner's patients live in remote areas. They cannot afford or access treatment because it is only available in large cities.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If left untreated, this heart condition will become life-threatening for patients.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Taung

Taung is a one-month-old baby girl from Burma. She lives with her parents and seven-year-old brother in a village in Hpan-An Township in Karen State. Her parents farm land owned by their relatives for free and grow rice for primarily their own consumption. Taung’s father also works as an agricultural day laborer. Taung was born at home with the assistance of a traditional birth attendant (TBA). As soon as she was born, the TBA noticed that she has a soft large sac protruding from the top of her head. Currently, the sac protruding from Taung’s head is continuously increasing in size. Sometimes, she cries so much her mother thinks that she is in pain. However, she responds to noise around her, and sleeps and breastfeeds well. Doctors want Taung to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose her condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $469 to cover the cost of Taung's CT scan and care, scheduled for March 15th. Taung’s mother said, “Over time, I have become increasingly worried about her head, whether it would become normal and if it could be treated. We do not have money to treat her, so we came to Mae Tao Clinic. I cry every time I touch her head and it is very hard for me to hold her. I feel like I am very unlucky that both of my children do not have good health. I want her to become healthy like other children.”

44% funded

44%funded
$310raised
$383to go
Chit

Chit is a 39-year-old woman from Burma. She lives with her daughter, mother-in-law, and her sister-in-law’s three children. Her husband has recently left the village to work in Bangkok so he could increase his income, especially since her condition has worsened. Since she became ill, she feels bored because she is unable to work. Around five months ago, Chit started to feel unwell with a stiff neck, headaches, and pain in her right eye. Soon after, she noticed that the black part of her right eye started to move inward toward the middle of her face, becoming crossed eyed. As soon as she noticed a change in her right eye, she went to a hospital to see a doctor about her condition. At the hospital, she underwent a CT scan of her head which showed normal findings. Therefore, the doctor just gave her an injection and oral medications. A week later, she decided to go see a local medic in her village because she felt like the medications were not helping. The medic looked at her medical test results, assessed her and said she might have a neurological condition. The medic gave her oral medication and another injection. She took the medication she received from the medic, and her symptoms subsided gradually. Chit's symptoms disappeared completely about 20 days ago, but this only lasted around 10 days because she noticed that the black part of her right eye had started to become white and the rest of her eye, normally white, started to turn red. She bought eye drops at a local medication stall, but they did not help. A few days later, she learned about Mae Tao Clinic (MTC), a charitable clinic, from one of her nephews. On January 11th, Chit visited MTC regarding her condition, and a medic explained that unfortunately her eye was not functional anymore and that it needed to be removed due to a severe infection. The medic also explained that if her right eye was not removed, the infection could spread to her left eye and cause the same problem. MTC then brought Chit to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) and the doctor there confirmed that her eye needs to be removed as soon as possible. Chit said, "It's upsetting to know that I need to have one of my eyes removed. But then, I feel that since the eye is bad, there is no sense in keeping it. In the future, if possible, I want to get a prosthetic eye."

72% funded

72%funded
$1,093raised
$407to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.