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Success! Ritah from Uganda raised $547 to fund treatment for a fistula.

Ritah
100%
  • $547 raised, $0 to go
$547
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Ritah's treatment was fully funded on January 8, 2018.

Photo of Ritah post-operation

October 9, 2017

Ritah underwent treatment for a fistula.

After treatment, Ritah feels much more comfortable than before. Ritah hopes to continue her charity work of visiting orphanage homes and adolescents in schools.

She says, “I thank donors so much…I pray God to bless donors for everything they do to support people in need like me.”

After treatment, Ritah feels much more comfortable than before. Ritah hopes to continue her charity work of visiting orphanage homes and ado...

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September 23, 2017

Ritah is a 41-year-old woman from Uganda. She works as a volunteer administrator at a baby’s home, and also grows beans, sorghum, and potatoes.

Ritah was diagnosed with a fistula, which is a connection between organs that should not be connected and is a condition especially common in women. A doctor has recommended surgical treatment.

In her free time, Ritah enjoys visiting babies in children’s homes to counsel them and offer material support, like the food that she grows. Ritah also enjoys visiting adolescents in schools to offer advice. Ritah hopes to visit communities to educate women about fistulas so that they can seek treatment. Her own treatment is scheduled for September 30.

Ritah said, “I thank donors for supporting my treatment and I pray God to protect them in everything they do to support the ladies out of their problems.”

Watsi is requesting $547 to help fund Ritah’s procedure.

Ritah is a 41-year-old woman from Uganda. She works as a volunteer administrator at a baby's home, and also grows beans, sorghum, and potato...

Read more

Ritah's Timeline

  • September 23, 2017
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Ritah was submitted by David Wamuwaya at The Kellermann Foundation.

  • September 26, 2017
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Ritah's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • September 30, 2017
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Ritah received treatment at Bwindi Community Hospital in Uganda. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • October 9, 2017
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Ritah's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • January 8, 2018
    FULLY FUNDED

    Ritah's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 1 donor

Profile 48x48 img 3508

Funded by 1 donor

Profile 48x48 img 3508
Treatment
Fistula
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $547 for Ritah's treatment
Hospital Fees
$324
Medical Staff
$51
Medication
$20
Supplies
$118
Labs
$34
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Women with a vesicovaginal fistula experience urinary dysfunction. They may also experience infection and soreness. Women with a rectovaginal fistula experience excretory dysfunction. They may also experience recurrent vaginal or urinary tract infections, irritation, pain, and sexual difficulty.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

This condition often leads to chronic medical problems, depression, social isolation, and deepening poverty. Fistula survivors are some of the most marginalized women in the world. They tend to live in extreme poverty in remote areas without the basic emergency care needed to treat an obstructed labor.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

The 2011 Uganda Demographic Health Survey estimated that there are between 140,000 to 200,000 women living with a fistula in Uganda. Despite the large number of women with fistulas, social stigma often makes it difficult to identify them. Additionally, women who do not understand the causes of fistula or the possibility of repair may not seek treatment. Others may avoid health facilities altogether. Radio announcements, village health teams, and community leaders can help women come forward.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After the patient arrives at the hospital, she will be admitted by the outpatient department. A clinical officer will review the patient’s file and refer her to a gynecologist for examination. The gynecologist will take the patient's history, examine the patient to determine the extent of the injury and damage, and order relevant tests. He or she will counsel the patient about the surgery and recovery. Surgery will be scheduled. On the day prior to surgery, the patient will be admitted to the hospital. Consent for surgery will be obtained. The patient will be taken to the theater at her scheduled time, and surgery will be performed. After surgery, the patient will be monitored every 30 minutes for four hours. She will stay in the hospital for approximately two weeks. She will receive counseling about the outcome of the surgery and what to expect from recovery.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Undergoing a fistula repair surgery can completely change a woman’s life. She will rejoin her community and family and begin planning for her future.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Sometimes, fistula surgeries are not successful. More complicated fistulas may require multiple attempts to repair. Other postoperative complications include hemorrhage, infection, anuria, wound breakdown, residual incontinence, hematometra, and urethral and vaginal strictures.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are approximately 18-20 medical facilities that can perform fistula surgery in Uganda. The nearest alternative to Bwindi Community Hospital is over a two-hour drive away on mountainous, dirt roads. Patients typically arrive at Bwindi Community Hospital by foot or motorcycle taxi.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no treatment alternatives.

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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Myo

Myo is a 14-year-old boy from Burma. He lives with his parents in a village in Karen State. His mother is a homemaker who is currently eight months pregnant. His father is a subsistence farmer, but he also works as a day laborer to earn money. Myo is in grade six and he enjoys playing football in his free time. Two years ago, Myo developed a pain in his arm which he noticed while playing football with his friends. Right away he was in a lot of pain, but his arm did not look broken. At first, the pain lessened, but gradually the pain worsened and his upper left forearm became swollen. Myo could also feel a mass under the swollen area of his left forearm. Myo and his father went to Chiang Mai Hospital, where he received a MRI and other tests, as well as a biopsy which confirmed that the tumor in his forearm was cancer. Now he needs surgery to remove the tumor, and he will need a chemo after surgery. The enlarged mass in Myo's left forearm has not increased in size, and only causes him pain when he lifts something heavy or when he does any physical activity with that arm such as washing his clothes or cleaning. Although he can take a shower by himself, using only his right arm makes it challenging. When he plays with his friends, he needs to protect his left forearm to prevent getting hurt. Myo's family sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund. He is now scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on December 8th, and his family needs help funding the $1,500 cost to cover his procedure and care. He said, “I feel sorry for my mother and I pity her that she has to stay alone with the new baby. I also feel sad that I cannot go to school this year. I want to recover quickly and go back to see my brother and mother.”

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