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Success! In from Cambodia raised $696 to fund shoulder surgery from a tractor accident.

In
100%
  • $696 raised, $0 to go
$696
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
In's treatment was fully funded on December 1, 2020.

Photo of In post-operation

June 30, 2020

In underwent shoulder surgery to repair his injury after a tractor accident.

In’s surgery was successful! His doctors performed a brachial plexus repair surgery. He will soon begin physiotherapy to help him regain full function of his arm. His quality of life will significantly improve and he will be able to go back to playing his favorite sport, baseball.

In said, “I am feeling great and my shoulder is getting better. Now, I am able to do more by myself. I want to go back to work in the rice field soon.”

In's surgery was successful! His doctors performed a brachial plexus repair surgery. He will soon begin physiotherapy to help him regain ful...

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April 29, 2020

In is a 36-year-old rice farmer from Cambodia. He has five brothers, one sister, and he is the oldest in his family. He is now married with one young child. In’s wife is also a rice farmer with him. He likes to play any sports, especially baseball, and listen to music during his free time.

In February 2020, In was in a tractor accident that caused paralysis of his left shoulder and left hemothorax. He has been diagnosed with a brachial plexus injury on his left side. The brachial plexus is a nerve network that transmits signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Injuries to this nerve network can result in loss of function and sensation. He is unable to move his left arm which prevents him from working in the rice field.

In traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On April 29th, he will undergo a brachial plexus repair surgery. After recovery, He will be able to use his arm again. Our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, is requesting $696 to fund this procedure.

“I hope that after surgery I can move my arm better without any pain, I want to return to the rice field to support my family,” In said.

In is a 36-year-old rice farmer from Cambodia. He has five brothers, one sister, and he is the oldest in his family. He is now married with ...

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In's Timeline

  • April 29, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    In was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • April 29, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    In received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • April 30, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    In's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • June 30, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    In's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • December 1, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    In's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 12 donors

Funded by 12 donors

Treatment
Brachial Plexus Injury Surgery
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $696 for In's treatment
Hospital Fees
$87
Medical Staff
$561
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Symptoms of brachial plexus injury (BPI) vary on the severity and location of the injury, but include muscle weakness, loss of sensation, pain, and paralysis. BPI can cause neuropathic pain with damage to the spinal cord and can be long-lasting, with effects such as burning numbness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

The impact of a brachial plexus injury can range in severity; some patients may experience weakness or great pain, others may be paralyzed in their shoulder and upper arm. This can make day-to-day tasks difficult and impair quality of life.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Motorcycle collisions are the most common cause of brachial plexus injury, and are, unfortunately, an exceedingly common occurrence in Cambodia.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Treatment for brachial plexus injury can involve nerve repair, nerve grafting, nerve transfer, or tendon and muscle transfers depending on the location and type of injury, and the amount of time since the injury occurred. A nerve repair involves reattaching a severed nerve; nerve graft is a procedure that takes a healthy nerve from another part of the body and transplants it to the injured nerve to guide regrowth; a nerve transfer is a procedure that cuts a donor nerve and connects it to the injured nerve when there is no functioning nerve stump to attach a graft. Nerve regeneration occurs approximately at a rate of 1 mm/day, and so recovery from a brachial plexus injury can take months for small improvements. Physical therapy during this time is important to prevent stiffness, contractures, or atrophy and increase the chances of regaining good movement in the affected limb.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

While BPI surgery may not restore full movement to a patient, it can greatly increase the patient’s ability to use the affected limb and reduce the pain of the injury.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

BPI surgery is complicated and risks include infection as well as failure to restore movement, which would require further surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Surgery to treat brachial plexus injury can be very complex and not widely performed. Surgical treatment in Cambodia can be expensive and hard to access. Patients will travel for hours by car, motocycle, and bus to receive free surgery at CSC.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Brachial plexus injury can have a range of severity; some patients may be able to be treated by splinting or physical therapy, but serious cases require surgical intervention. These types of injuries do not have alternatives to improving movement and functionality.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Boramey

Boramey is an adorable 2-year-old toddler from Cambodia. She has an older sister, who is seven and in the 1st grade, and an older brother, who is four and not in school yet. Her father works as a driver for a construction company, and her mother sells groceries at a local market. Boramey's favorite activities include playing with the other children in her neighborhood and snacking on bread. When Boramey was born, she experienced an injury called shoulder dystocia, which occurs when one or both of a baby's shoulders become stuck inside the pelvis during childbirth. As a result, the nerves responsible for providing feeling and movement in her shoulder and arm were stretched. Boramey cannot move her left arm and has no shoulder abduction or elbow or wrist flexion. She has been diagnosed with a brachial plexus injury on her left side. The brachial plexus is a nerve network that transmits signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, and hand; injuries to this nerve network can result in loss of function and sensation. Our medical partner's care center is the only center in Cambodia where the treatment Boramey needs is available. On January 3rd, she will undergo a brachial plexus repair surgery. Our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre (CSC), is requesting $709 to fund this procedure. Boramey's parents were able to gather $100 to contribute to her care. Boramey's mother said: "I hope the doctors can fix her arm so she can use it like other children and be able to go to school when she is old enough."

29% funded

29%funded
$210raised
$499to go
Kasotot

Kasotot is a cheerful 68-year-old woman from the arid region of Baringo County in Kenya. She is a widow and mother of seven children who are all grown. She lives with her youngest son and grandson. The main economic activity in the area is livestock herding of cattle, sheep, and goats. It is a challenging life, affected by insecurity, cattle rustling, and a lack of schools and other services. Most people barter with their neighboring communities for food and/or sell their animals in order to get money for food. Kasotot has no knowledge of medical insurance, and lives in a place full of hardships with no opportunity to do any saving. Kasotot suffers from epilepsy and last month she had a seizure that made her fall into the fire and burn her foot. She went to the closest hospital for treatment. Her wound condition worsened with time and when she went back to the hospital it was already infected. The facility was small, and was unable to provide the needed treatment, so she was referred to Kapsowar Hospital. Upon examination, she was admitted for urgent debridement, or deep cleaning of the wound. Kasotot is currently confined to a wheelchair, thus not able to work. Her wound is now clean after a successful wound debridement, but she requires a free tissue flap in order to reconstruct her burned foot and quicken her healing. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Kasotot receive treatment. On November 7th, surgeons will perform surgery so Kasotot will be able to walk, work and provide for herself so as to not overly burden her son and grandson. Now, she needs help to fund this $1,478 procedure. Kasotot says, “I have really burdened my son and grandson now that I cannot walk on my own. It really hurts when all they can do is look after me while I cannot help them as I did before. Kindly help me so that we can be together in order to bring food to our table and strive together to get our basic needs.”

78% funded

78%funded
$1,167raised
$310to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.