Hai-Ning WuMONTHLY DONOR
Hai-Ning's Story

Hai-Ning joined Watsi on April 24th, 2013. Seven years ago, Hai-Ning joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Hai-Ning's most recent donation traveled 8,200 miles to support Selinah, a nun from Uganda, to fund a hysterectomy.

Impact

Hai-Ning has funded healthcare for 88 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Hai-Ning

Selinah is a 31-year-old nun from Uganda. She serves as a nun under Our Lady of Fatima Rushoroza and is currently posted to the formation house of the Missionaries of Africa. She does not receive salary for her services apart from a small allowance for personal use. She is the fifth born in a family of 10 and her parents are small-scale farmers. For three years, Selinah has been experiencing lower abdominal pains. She was treated for a bacterial infection with no change in symptoms. She has also had several medications from different medical centers. None of them helped, and in the last year her condition has worsened. She can no longer stand comfortably for long because she has pains extending to her lower body. Selinah has challenges getting out of bed due to this pain. Selinah has been diagnosed with leiomyoma and endometrial hyperplasia. If not treated, she is at a risk of endometrial carcinoma and other severe complications like anaemia. Selinah has sought financial support from her congregation, but shared that they are unable to meet the surgery cost because of the number of congregants affected by COVID-19. She needs to undergo a hysterectomy, a procedure in which surgeons will remove her uterus. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is requesting $319 to fund Selinah's surgery. On September 4th, she will undergo gynecological surgery at our medical partner's care center. Once recovered, Selinah will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain. Sister Selinah says, “My condition has generally affected my duties and life as a nun. Given treatment, I will be able to do all my day to day duties and be able to develop my congregation. I will continue serving the Lord by helping others where I can.”

21%funded
$70raised
$249to go

James is a very playful and jovial boy. He loves to play with his friends and, his grandmother shared, they would play with anything because toys are hard to come by. One day James and his friends found a calabash and chose to play with it. While they were playing, one of them took the calabash and threw it to James. The calabash hit James at his right hip and he fell down. He struggled to stand up and immediately started limping and crying out of pain. He was rushed home to his grandmother where she took him to a nearby facility. James was given some pain medication and then sent home. His grandmother shared that a few days down the line his situation was not getting any better and he could not walk. James's grandmother sourced some funds and brought him to Kijabe Hospital for examination. Upon review, the doctor requested scans to develop a treatment plan, but due to lack of money to pay for the scan, his grandmother decided to go back home and look for money. While at home, it was took her a long time to raise the required amount for the scans. One day their church pastor visited to check on how they are adapting to life after the death of James’s mother. During the visit, he noticed that James was barely moving. He was concerned and asked his grandmother what was wrong. James's grandmother explained what happened and the current situation they are in. The pastor brought James back to Kijabe Hospital for the scans. When the doctor reviewed the scans, they immediately admitted James as an emergency case and a surgery was done helping to save his leg. During a regular clinic follow-up yesterday, his doctor noticed that the wound was oozing and was concerned about an infection. An x-ray was done and showed that his leg again needs emergency surgery to treat his condition. James is the youngest of four children. His father separated with his mother, and left James and his siblings to his mother. A few years later, James's mother died and his grandmother has taken full responsibility of the four children. To earn a living, his grandmother does laundry and ploughs farms for their neighbors. She does not have another source of income. James's first surgery was supported by Friends of Kijabe Hospital, but his grandmother is appealing for financial help for the surgery that is now needed for James. James’ grandmother shared, “At home after the first surgery, I was very happy to see James slowly trying to play with his friends again. Those were happy moments that I never thought James would experience again. I am requesting for financial help to put back a smile on his face."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Thomas is a 45-year-old laborer from Uganda who came to Kenya in search of a livelihood. He is the oldest child in a family of 5 children. His mother passed in 2005, and his father left the family, which forced him to come to Kenya to search for a job. Thomas has four children aged between 4 and 17 years of age. They currently live with their mother. In November, Thomas suffered right tibia and humerus fractures after being knocked by a hit and run vehicle. While crossing the road along the Nakuru-Nairobi highway, he was hit by a vehicle that took off immediately. Left unconscious, he could not remember subsequent events, but he was rushed to the hospital and admitted. As a result of the accident, Thomas cannot move nor use his hand and leg, and is in constant pain. He cannot move on his own and needs a wheelchair to move around. For the last three weeks, Thomas has been bedridden, and has had no visitors because none of his family can be reached. Doctors recommended a humerus ORIF surgery to correct the fracture. Though he was scheduled for surgery, it was cancelled because he was unable to raise money. Thomas normally works as a casual laborer, loading and off-loading building stones, at a construction site along the highway. His daily income is about $USD3 a day and generally inconsistent, depending on the availability of work. Thomas is still financially supporting his children, and he does not have medical insurance coverage. He appeals for financial help for his cost of care. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 8th, Thomas will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. The surgery will allow him to walk with ease and also use his hand with ease. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,500 to fund his life-changing procedure. Thomas shared, “I am unable to move nor use my arm since the accident. Doctors recommended this surgery but I have not been able to get it because I don’t have money. I have been unable to contact my family or friends back at home, and I am all alone with no one to turn to.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Margaret is a 65-year-old woman from Kenya. She is a happy lady with two adult sons, whom she raised as a young, single mother. Margaret initially sought care due to excruciating pains in her knee and right leg. Her knee problems started back in late 2017, and she visited a health facility in her hometown, Kiambu, for medical attention. However, after that first treatment, her condition has only deteriorated. After visiting several health centers, she was referred to our medical partner's care center, Kijabe Hospital. In early October, she was reviewed by their orthopedic team, who recommended a total knee replacement surgery. Margaret underwent a knee replacement procedure and was finally discharged after a lengthy stay in the hospital. Unfortunately, during her follow-up clinical review visits, her doctors continued to discover infections and fluctuant swelling that require further attention and treatment. Margaret has undergone additional treatment including draining and debridement on the area that was operated on during her total knee replacement surgery. Now, she will need another debridement and skin graft procedure, in addition to a total knee implant hardware removal, to prevent possible infections that could result in amputation or even death. She is currently ambulating on crutches. In the past, Margaret relied on national health insurance funding to support her medical and surgical treatment costs. However, the money has been depleted over time, and they are unable to cover any additional surgical bills for her. Margaret does not work and has been relying on her sons for physical and financial support. They do not have have stable jobs and are responsible for monitoring her treatment and care. Margaret and her sons have tried to raise funds from friends and relatives, to no avail. They are appealing for financial help. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Margaret receive treatment. On November 4th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to heal the infection and allow her to walk more easily. Now, Margaret needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. Margaret shared, “I have been through a lot with this leg. Anytime it heals, the pain starts again. I can’t even sleep because of the pain. I appreciate any support you can provide."

$1,185raised
Fully funded