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Andrew Rowan

United States   •   Born on April 15

Andrew's Story

Andrew joined Watsi on May 31st, 2018. 18 other people also joined Watsi on that day! Andrew's most recent donation traveled 8,500 miles to support Jayden, a 2-year-old baby boy from Kenya, to fund an orchidopexy procedure.

Impact

Andrew has funded healthcare for 18 patients in 7 countries.

All patients funded by Andrew

Jayden

Jayden is 2-year-old baby boy from Kiambu County, Kenya. He is the second born in a family of two children. His mother is a housewife, while his father does casual work as a mason. Jayden was born with cryptorchidism, a condition in which one or both of the testicles remains undescended. When he was a few months old, his mother noticed that she could not feel his testes, but ultimately the family did not bring him in to a doctor. Recently, his grandmother also noticed this, which led to Jayden being brought to the hospital. There, doctors ordered a scan that showed bilateral undescended testicles, and they recommend Jayden has an orchidopexy surgery to correct the condition. If left untreated, Jayden has an increased risk of developing hernias, testicular cancer, and fertility problems in the future. However, this procedure is costly for Jayden and his family. Jayden's father earns just enough income to support his family's basic needs. He is not able to afford Jayden's surgery, and appeals for financial support. Jayden will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on January 5th. AMHF is requesting $483 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. Jayden's mother shared, “Although we don’t go to church, I pray to God that our son may have this support and get successful treatment so that he may have a normal future like other boys.”

100% funded

$483raised
Fully funded
U Win

U Win is a 54-year-old man who lives with his wife and youngest son in the Ayeyarwaddy Division in Burma. He has three sons and three daughters, with five of his children already married and working. His 17-year-old son left school because they were unable to pay school fees, and worked as a day laborer until COVID-19 happened. U Win used to work as a day laborer as well, but stopped working around two years ago due to his health condition. His family survives on 60,000 kyat (approx. 60 USD) each month that U Win's three other daughters and another son send them, enough to cover their basic expenses. In January 2012, U Win felt tired, had a headache, suffered from heart palpitations, and a rapid heartbeat. He went to a clinic where the doctor listened to his heart with a stethoscope and checked his blood pressure. U Win was told that he has high blood pressure and that he would need to take oral medication for a long time. He received an injection, oral medication, and another appointment for more medication. After he took the medication, he felt better and he went back to work. However, U Win continued to experience worsening symptoms over the next few years, returning to clinics and receiving the same treatment. He was told at one point to visit a cardiologist, but did not do so until later on. In August 2020, during another clinic visit in Yangon, the doctor diagnosed U Win with an atrial septal defect, and said that he would need to receive surgery to repair this hole in his heart. If not treated, the condition could weaken his heart further and cause lung problems later on. He was unable to receive surgery in November due to an upsurge in COVID-19 cases, and was also told the procedure would cost about 3,000,000 kyat (approx. 3,000 USD). Luckily, U Win’s wife remembered that there is a charity group in Yangon that might be able to help. The group told him about our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, to look for assistance with accessing the treatment he needed. U Win currently experiences chest pain and back pain, has no appetite, and cannot sleep well at night. He appeals for financial support for his cost of care. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 20th, U Win will undergo an atrial septal defect closure procedure. Once recovered, his quality of life will significantly improve and he will be able to return to work. Now, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. U Win shared, “I want to get better soon so that I can work for my family again. I am worried about my family’s future because we cannot find work in the village. My son also cannot go to Yangon to find another job because of COVID-19 travel restrictions.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Musiimenta

Musiimenta is a 17-year-old student. She is the third-born in a family of six children, of which she is the only girl and has five brothers. Musiimenta initially arrived at the hospital complaining of chest and epigastric pain associated with vomiting. She expressed that she has felt a mass in her lower abdominal region for the past three years. Musiimenta also reported that she always felt as though she has a full abdomen, headache, abdominal discomfort. These symptoms have hindered her appetite, and she often felt congestion in her chest, causing shortness of breath. Though she had been experiencing symptoms for a while, Musiimenta had never been to the hospital for medical treatment before because her parents could not afford care. However, when her condition worsened, her father brought her to hospital, where she was referred to the gynaecologist for further assessment. A scan indicated a solid mass and a normal uterus with some fluid accumulation, which caused her abdominal swelling. Musiimenta was diagnosed with a large bilateral tubo ovarian mass and was recommended for curative laparotomy treatment. However, this procedure is costly for Musiimenta and her family. Her father is a small-scale farmer with a banana plantation, where he is able to grow food and sell plantains to earn an income. He sometimes brews locally made alcohol called tonto to sustain his family and pay school fees for his children. Her family does not have enough extra income to pay for her treatment and they are appealing for financial support. On November 3rd, Musiimenta will undergo a curative laparotomy procedure to treat her condition. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $242 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. This procedure will hopefully reduce the swelling in her abdomen and halt the discomfort she has been enduring. Musiimenta's father shared, “I hope that once my daughter undergoes surgery, she will be able to live well once again in good health. She will continue with school after she has recovered and when schools are re-opened.”

100% funded

$242raised
Fully funded
Irshad

Irshad was diagnosed with an anorectal malformation a day or two after birth. This followed frequent vomiting, poor feeding and distention of his abdomen. A colostomy (a perforation on his abdomen to aid in passing stool) was put in place at day three and after six weeks a pull-through procedure was done. This was to create an anal opening. In order to keep the newly created anus from closing, Irshad’s parents were advised to do dilation which according to them, they faithfully did. Upon review, the doctor noted that the anal opening was not well dilated and would need a revision. The doctor then referred them to Watsi Medical Partner care center BethanyKids Hospital where surgery has been recommended. If not treated, Irshad will not be able to pass stool normally. The cost of buying colostomy bags has proven to be quite expensive for his parents and thus, they have resulted to using old clothes. This puts little Irshad at risk of infection and scarring at the colostomy site due to occasional leakages. Irshad’s parents hoped that the national health insurance fund would help fund the treatment, but since it is a repeat surgery, their request was turned down. Irshad’s father is employed casually as an office messenger while his mother is a full-time mom. Irshad is the second born of two children. He lives with his parents and elder brother in a two-room rental house in the coastal region of Kenya. His father assures that he can raise Kes15,000, but that is not enough to support the surgery needed and thus appeals for help.

100% funded

$708raised
Fully funded