Michelle MoralesUNIVERSAL FUND MEMBER
Michelle's Story

Michelle joined Watsi on January 31st, 2017. Seven years ago, Michelle joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Michelle's most recent donation supported Jack Zing, a 40-year-old midwife and refugee from Burma, to fund surgery to alleviate pain and prevent further complications.

Impact

Michelle has funded healthcare for 73 patients in 13 countries.

Patients funded by Michelle

Jack Zing is a 40-year-old woman who lives with her friend in a refugee camp in Tak Province and works as a midwife at the clinic in the camp run by the International Rescue Committee (IRC). She earns a monthly income of 3,222 baht (approx. $107 USD). She additionally receives 310 baht (approx. $10 USD) per month on a cash card from the organization The Border Consortium in the camp. This income is just enough to cover their daily expenses, but not enough for savings. The camp provides free health care through the IRC, but not for the care that she needs. Since 2020, Jack Zing has been experiencing lower abdominal pain, slight bleeding, unexplained fatigue and dizziness. She was diagnosed with adenomyoma with bilateral endometriotic cysts, and was advised to undergo a total abdominal hysterectomy, the surgical removal of her uterus and cervix. If left untreated, Jack Zing's symptoms will continue to worsen and put her at risk for further health complications in the future. Fortunately, Jack Zing is scheduled to undergo her hysterectomy on June 4th. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,104 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Once recovered, this treatment will help relieve her symptoms, including the pain and bleeding. Jack Zing says, “I felt very sad and worried when I learnt that I needed surgery, because I couldn’t afford to pay for the treatment. When I learnt that Burma Children's Medical Fund (BCMF) and donors will support the cost of my surgery treatment, I was very happy. I would like to thank all the donors and BCMF. When I recover fully, I will continue working as a midwife at IRC and also pursue my interest in sewing."

$471raised
$633to go

Abdul is is charming, energetic, and friendly boy from Tanzania. He is four years old and the youngest member of a family comprising of four children, residing in Katundi village, Kigoma Region. Enrolling Abdul in school has posed challenges for his parents due to his difficulty in walking. Abdul was diagnosed with bilateral genu valgus. His legs curve inwards, significantly impacting his mobility. His school, situated 4 km from home, compounds the issue, making the daily walk difficult. The family faces financial hardships, relying on small-scale agriculture for sustenance without additional sources of income. They make ends meet primarily because of the relatively low cost of living in their village. Sponsorship from the church supports most of Abdul’s siblings’ education. Despite his physical condition, Abdul remains enthusiastic about life. He engages in playful activities, running around and enjoying time with his friends. The family became aware of Kafika House Care Centre through an outreach program, and Nomad Tours played a significant role in facilitating Abdul’s transportation to the facility. After examination, it was concluded that he would require surgical intervention to correct his deformity. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery and treatment for Abdul at their care center Kafika House. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 16th. Treatment will hopefully restore Abdul's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Abdul’s mother says: “I hope my son’s leg will be straight and he will be able to walk comfortably.”

$880raised
Fully funded

Asiyatu is a married mother of two children aged 8 and 3 years. Her first child is in 3rd grade and the youngest is in nursery school. She is a homemakerwhile her husband is an Airtel money branch manager earning about $208.72 per month from his business and he takes care of all the bills at home. They live in a three-bedroomed rented house costing $29.82 per month. Asiyatu likes chatting with her children and enjoys eating chips and vegetables. Asiyatu was well until 2020 after the delivery of her second child when she noted a small lump on her left breast that was not painful. She visited a nearby hospital but did not receive help. The husband took her to Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH) after noting that the lump was getting bigger as time passed. She was brought to Partners in Hope Medical Center (PIH) for a lumpectomy which is a surgery that removes cancer from the breast through the removal of a tumor and a small rim of normal tissues around it, and a sample was sent for histology. In September, she reported back to PIH for histology results that revealed an Invasive Breast Carcinoma requiring a mastectomy. She was then referred back to KCH for surgery since the husband could no longer manage to pay for the surgery as he did with the previous one. She was scheduled for surgery the next year. Lately, Asiyatu has been experiencing needle-pricking pain that is becoming unbearable without pain-relieving medications, affecting her household chores. As a result of her pain, her husband took her back to the hospital in November for support where she was then referred back to PIH for urgent surgery seeking support under the Watsi program. Doctors at PIH confirmed the need for a modified radical mastectomy, a surgery. Their family is able to commit $89.45 to support her care and their family is raising the remaining funds. Asiyatu believes the surgical operation will help her get back home in good condition and continue taking care of her children and her caring husband. Asiyatu said, “I am ready to live with one breast as I hope to get rid of all my pains and have my perfect life back again.”

$1,194raised
Fully funded

Simwenda is a three-year-old boy from Tanzania. He resides in a village in the Mpanda district. His parents, hardworking farmers, work daily to provide for their family’s subsistence needs. Simwenda was born with a clubfoot - a birth abnormality in which the foot is twisted out of shape or position. The tissues connecting the muscles to the bone (tendons) are shorter than usual, causing the foot to twist and making walking and wearing shoes difficult. Simwenda’s parents, with limited resources and no access to medical insurance, could only watch their son’s condition worsen for three years. It broke their hearts to see him suffer. The nearest hospital could not provide the treatment he needed. Simwenda’s parents shared their son’s story with their community, hoping for help and learned that services would be available at the Plaster House, a care center of our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH). However, Simwenda's parents encountered a significant obstacle in obtaining care: transportation costs. Their village is hundreds of miles from Arusha, where the medical care center is located. Simwenda’s family organized a fundraising event to raise money for the transportation and additional expenses of the journey. Upon Simwenda’s arrival at the center, he received a warm welcome. The medical team will begin clubfoot treatment on September 15. AMH is requesting $935 to fund Simwenda's clubfoot repair. After treatment, he will be able to walk with less struggle. Simwende’s mother says: “Despite our financial situations, we have tried so hard to get him treatment. I hope this time around our son has a chance to get treatment.”

$935raised
Fully funded