Amornsak Pattaraumpornsak
Amornsak's Story

Amornsak joined Watsi on March 19th, 2015. 14 other people also joined Watsi on that day! Amornsak's most recent donation traveled 10,000 miles to support Djouvensley, a 4-year-old boy from Haiti, for life-saving heart surgery.

Impact

Amornsak has funded healthcare for 11 patients in 4 countries.

All patients funded by Amornsak

Meet Djouvensley, a 4-year-old boy from Haiti. “He is an only child and is very close to his mother, and shy around people he doesn’t know,” explains our medical partner, Haiti Cardiac Alliance (HCA). “He hasn’t started preschool yet, in part because of his cardiac condition, but his mother plans to enroll him as soon as he has healed from surgery.” “Djouvensley was born with a cardiac condition called double outlet right ventricle, a birth defect in which both major arteries flow out of the same chamber of the heart, creating circulatory problem,” reports HCA. “This leaves him weak and at risk of death if not corrected.” It is important that Djouvensley’s condition is treated as soon as possible. The treatment for double outlet right ventricle is surgery. Upon looking at the heart to decide the best course of treatment, surgeons will proceed to connect the aorta to the left ventricle and the pulmonary artery to the right ventricle. This will fix the circulatory problem and ensure blood flows through Djouvensley’s heart correctly. An organization called International Children’s Heart Foundation is helping with the costs of the surgery. With their generous subsidy, Djouvensley only needs our help in raising $1,500 for the surgery. After the surgery, doctors anticipate that Djouvensley will no longer experience any cardiac symptoms. He will be able to live a normal life and do the things he enjoys without complication. “We are so thankful to everyone who is helping my son,” shares Djouvensley’s mother. “I can never thank you enough but God will reward you.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Brian, a 35-year-old Kenyan man, came to our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), seeking treatment for a leg injury sustained earlier this year in a hit-and-run accident involving a motorcycle. “Since then,” explains AMHF, “he is unable to work and relies solely on his family.” Brian’s condition, chronic osteomyelitis of the right tibia, is an infection of his lower leg bone resulting from his injury. Typical symptoms include recurring pain, redness, swelling, and bone loss. Currently, “Brian is experiencing pain and inability to use his right leg,” AMHF tells us. “If not treated, Brian is at risk of pathological fracture of the tibia.” Treatment of osteomyelitis is a surgical technique to regenerate bone lost as a result of the infection. In this technique—known as bone transport—an orthopedic surgeon breaks the involved bone and attaches the bone fragments to an external fixation device. As the fracture begins to heal, the external fixator is adjusted to pull the healing fracture apart approximately one millimeter per day. Separating the fragments in this manner promotes bone growth and results in the restoration of the lost bone over time. After the accident, Brian was treated surgically, but the procedure was unsuccessful, and he cannot pay for the additional surgery that he needs. $1,500 in funding pays for the bone transport surgery as well as 12 days of hospital care, antibiotic therapy, and physiotherapy. Brian’s family has saved $110 to cover additional costs associated with his care. “We expect after a bone transport, Brian's leg will heal,” shares AMHF. “He will be able to use his leg again. Brian will be able to work.” "I had planned to marry and provide for my family before this accident,” says Brian. “I really hope I will be able to do that after this surgery.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

“Two years ago, Paw May began to feel pain in her abdomen,” shares our medical partner, Burma Border Projects (BBP). The pain was initially treated with medicine, but returned two months ago. After traveling to Thailand to find healthcare, 50-year-old Paw May was found to have kidney stones. Kidney stones form when a change occurs in the normal balance of salts and minerals found in the urine. When these stones attempt to pass through the body, they can cause a great deal of pain, fever and chills. BBP explains, “Paw May is no longer able to carry on with her daily household work.” As a mother to three children—two of whom are still in high school—Paw May works hard to take care of her family. According to BBP, “Her son and husband both cultivate rice and grow vegetables to eat. Paw May and her family live hand-to-mouth and are very self-sufficient.” Though this self-sufficient lifestyle supports the family most of the time, Paw May and her husband often have to borrow money and are looking for Watsi support to help out with treatment. $1,500 will fund the treatment Paw May needs to treat her condition. She will undergo a surgical procedure to remove her kidney stones, and receive transportation to and from the hospital. The funding also covers post-operative care and medication. With this treatment, Paw May will no longer run the risk of infection and increased discomfort, as surgical intervention will impede the growth of the kidney stones and prevent future problems. BBP tells us, “After surgery Paw May will be able to return home, where she will be able to return to her domestic chores and help her children.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Meet Yin, a 34-year-old mother of three from Burma. Yin is married with one son and two daughters. “She works as a market vendor selling fruits and vegetables, and her husband is a rickshaw driver. They have never been able to save money, because it is very expensive to send their three children to school,” reports our medical partner, Burma Border Projects (BBP). “Despite the financial barrier, Yin insists on making sure her children are educated, because she was only able to attend school until grade 3 and wants more for them.” Yin was born with congenital heart disease, a defect in the heart’s structure that results in loss of normal function, and eventually heart failure. “Yin first learned of her condition when she was 17, but never sought treatment because she knew she could not afford it,” continues BBP. “Yin’s condition causes her to experience weight loss, dizziness, severe heart palpitations, fatigue and chest pains. She finds she needs to rest for longer and longer periods after physical activity, and the financial burden of disease is causing her stress.” “In August 2014, her symptoms became so severe that she took a loan of 500 USD from a money lender and went to see a doctor who told her she would need surgery,” explains BBP. “Yin has been unable to work for the past year and worries about how she will pay back her loans.” For $1500, Yin can receive a complex cardiac surgery that will correct the congenital heart defect and fully resolve her current symptoms. This cost covers the procedure, hospitalization (x-rays, medication, laboratory testing, meals), transport, and pre and post-surgery outpatient visits. Yin remains positive and looks forward to a bright future. “Yin plans to go back into business after treatment and sell goods in many different markets,” says BBP. “Her dream is to one day run her own company. She believes that treatment will allow her to be a better wife and mother.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded