Gary SielingMONTHLY DONOR
Gary's Story

Gary joined Watsi on July 6th, 2014. One year ago, Gary joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Gary's most recent donation traveled 8,500 miles to support Prince, a 5-year-old from Kenya, to fund surgery so he can walk and study again soon.

Impact

Gary has funded healthcare for 78 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Gary

Prince is a 5-year-old and the youngest of three children. His father works at a construction site to help provide income for his family. In early February, Prince was on the school bus when the bus ran into a nearby shop. Prince was trapped between seats and became injured. He was rushed to a nearby health facility for first aid and underwent surgery. Two weeks later, he was referred to our medical partner's care center Kijabe Hospital for review. Prince then underwent a debridement and skin graft procedure in mid-February. Currently, Prince cannot walk and attend school, which is affecting his ability to move up in grades this year. Prince’s first two surgeries were paid for using his parent’s medical coverage, but the medical insurer turned down the current request for the surgery Prince needs to heal. Prince’s family shared that their trips to the hospital have exhausted their savings. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), can help Prince receive treatment. On May 25th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure. This surgery will address any risks of infection so that Prince’s leg can heal and he can walk again and resume his studies. AMH is requesting $1,185 to help to fund this procedure. Prince’s father said, “Prince has missed school since February. He was supposed to graduate to grade one, but due to the injuries, he did not. He needs this surgery so that he can be able to walk again.”

55%funded
$655raised
$530to go

U Than is a 45-year-old man from Burma who lived by himself in a village. He used to look after his neighbor's cows in exchange for rice. However, since January 2022, U Than is unfortunately unemployed, has no income and no permanent address. In mid-January 2022, U Than was on his way to Thailand to find better work. He arrived at a bus station, and, after requesting a ride to a local guest house, he was left on the side of the road and mugged. He visited a local hospital where he had an x-ray of his right arm that showed that both of the bones in his forearm were broken. The nurse there wrapped his arm in a bandage and gave him some pain medication, but told him he would need to get surgery elsewhere. Currently, he cannot use his right arm and has difficulty grabbing things with his right hand. Fortunately, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), is helping U Than receive treatment. On January 26th, he will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure will help him recover and find work again. Now, he needs help raising $1,500 to fund his procedure and care. U Than shared, "I feel very uncomfortable using my left hand when I eat or go to the toilet as I usually never use my left hand. I feel so sad that I have this unexpected problem. I thought that my life will be better when I come here and find work. This was not what I was expecting. I am happy to hear that there will be donors to help pay for my treatment’s cost. Thank you."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Ar is a 28-year-old man who lives with his wife, three sons, and two daughters in a refugee camp. Originally from Burma, his family fled to Thailand 20 years ago due to civil war. His children attend school, except for his youngest daughter, who is not yet old enough. His wife is a homemaker and Ar works as a day laborer when work is available. Ar's family shared that, in addition to his day laborer pay, they receive a monthly cash card from The Border Consortium to purchase food in the refugee camp. Overall, the family's total monthly income is just enough to cover their basic needs. On September 2nd, Ar climbed a tamarind tree to pick tamarinds fruit. When the branch he was standing on suddenly broke, he fell and landed on his right arm and experienced pain in his back. He visited the camp hospital that day, and the medic initially determined that his arm was not broken. Due to recent positive COVID-19 cases in the refugee camp, Ar could not be immediately referred to the local hospital for further testing and was kept for observation at the camp hospital. When the pain in Ar's back and arm did not subside the next day, the medic referred Ar to the local hospital. After receiving a negative COVID-19 test, Ar was finally able to visit the hospital on September 6th, where he received an X-ray for his arm and a blood test for a second COVID-19 test. The X-ray revealed that his upper right arm is broken. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), Ar will undergo surgery on September 8th to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure will enable Ar to continue working in the future. BCMF is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. Ar shared, "I am scared to receive surgery. But I was told that I will not be able to work using my right arm if I do not receive surgery, so I gave my consent to the doctor. I hope that I will be able to work again after I receive treatment."

$1,500raised
Fully funded