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Sean Pennino

MONTHLY DONOR

United States

Sean's Story

Sean joined Watsi on November 7th, 2014. Six years ago, Sean joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Sean's most recent donation traveled 8,600 miles to support Naw Ree, a refugee and maternal & child health worker from Thailand, to fund a fracture repair.

Team

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Teespring

12 members

Impact

Sean has funded healthcare for 77 patients in 11 countries.

All patients funded by Sean

Naw Ree

Naw Ree is a 49-year-old woman from Thailand. Naw Ree has lived by herself in a refugee camp in northern Thailand since 2009. As a camp resident, Naw Ree receives 243 baht (approx. $8 USD) each month from an organization that supports refugee camp residents. She also works as a maternal and child health worker, receiving 900 baht (approx. $30 USD) per month. Naw Ree raises chickens and grows vegetables. Despite receiving free health care services in the camp, Naw Ree is struggling to make ends meet. On December 16th, 2020, Naw Ree went to see a woman who had recently given birth, to remind her about vaccinating her baby on time. After sitting and talking to the woman in her home, Naw Ree stood up to leave but felt light headed and fell. She put out her left hand to stop her fall, and hurt her left arm. She went to the hospital in the camp, run by Malteser International [MI] Thailand, and received pain medication and her arm was put into a sling. The next day, she was referred to Mae Seriang General Hospital for further treatment. At the hospital she received x-rays and the doctor told her that she had fractured one of the bones in her left forearm. She was then referred to Chiang Mai Hospital for further treatment, but her transfer was delayed for over two weeks due to an outbreak in COVID-19 cases in northern Thailand. Since Naw Ree lives by herself, she has to cook, wash her clothes, and feed her chickens without anyone's help, a difficult feat with her broken arm. Currently, she is in pain but has no fever. She can only fall asleep if she takes pain medication. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Naw Ree will undergo surgery to reset her fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for January 6th and will cost $1,500. After surgery, Naw Ree will no longer be in pain. She will be able to go back to work as a health worker and she will be able to complete her household chores without pain or discomfort. Naw Ree shared, "My greatest wish is that I recover and that I may be able to use my left arm again."

66% funded

66%funded
$992raised
$508to go
Haruna

Haruna is a 10-year-old student from Tanzania. Haruna is the fourth born child in a family of five children. He is currently in Class Five, and his best subjects are mathematics and social studies. Haruna is a big lover of football, which his father says he picked at an early age. Unfortunately, a few months ago, his father has had to stop him from playing football due to the level of deformity in his legs and risk of getting a fracture. Haruna was diagnosed with genu varus. His legs bow outwards at the knee so that they do not touch. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, he has difficulty walking for a distance and he is no longer able to play football, the sport he loves. The procedure Haruna needs is costly for his family. Haruna's parents are small-scale farmers of maize, beans and tobacco. They are able to get their food from the harvest of maize and vegetable and some little money from selling tobacco harvest. Now, they are appealing for financial support for Haruna's cost of care. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Haruna. The procedure is scheduled to take place on December 3rd. Treatment will hopefully restore Haruna's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Haruna shared, “I would like to be able to walk well and play like my friends. Please help me get this treatment."

72% funded

72%funded
$634raised
$246to go
Nay Kaw

Nay Kaw is an 11-year-old boy from Burma. He lives with his parents, two older brothers and two younger sisters in a village in Karen State. Nay Kaw and his sister are both students. He is a grade one student since leaving the monkhood last year. His father is a farmer. Nay Kaw was born with a small mass on his right wrist. Once Nay Kaw's mother was able to save up and send him to Mae Tao Clinic for treatment in Thailand, Nay Kaw had the mass surgically removed in July at Mae Sot Hospital. After surgery, the biopsy revealed that the mass was caused by a hemangioma. As a result of this, the doctor referred him for further treatment in nearby Chiang Mai. Since his surgery, the pain in his wrist has decreased. However, if something touches his right wrist or if he has to carry something heavy in his right hand, he is in a lot of pain. Doctors want Nay Kaw to undergo an MRI, an imaging procedure that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce images of bodily organs. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $814 to cover the cost of Nay Kaw's MRI and care, scheduled for October 8th. "I want my right hand to be normal and I do not want to have an unusually large wrist," he said. "If the pain in my hand decreases, I will help my mother with the housework. If my hand will be without pain and I will be able to play with my friends at school, I will be happy with my friends again. In the future I will go school and become a good person."

90% funded

90%funded
$740raised
$74to go
Johnson

Johnson is an 8-month baby boy from Tanzania. Johnson, the last born child in a family of four, and already is a very active and friendly little boy. Johnson's parents are both subsistence farmers. Johnson was born in a local hospital where his parents were informed that his spine was not fully formed, thus resulting in a condition known as spinal bifida. Because Johnson's condition was not severe, they were informed that he wouldn’t need treatment and that it would close on its own. As their family continued to attend clinics they were told to wait till Johnson gets to five months old for him to have any kind of treatment. At five months they took him to hospital for the treatment but the cost was too high for them to afford and they had to return home. As time went by, Johnson's mother saw that his condition could end up complicated if he didn’t get treatment soon and end up greatly affecting Johnson later in life. She decided to seek treatment. She went to Mt Meru and was referred to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center ALMC for more help.  Johnson was born with spina bifida, a type of neural tube defect in which the spine does not properly close around the spinal cord. Without treatment, Johnson is at risk of lower-limb paralysis, infection of the exposed nervous tissue, development of tethered cord syndrome, and possible developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,015 to cover the cost of Johnson's spina bifida closure surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on September 7th. This procedure will hopefully spare Johnson from the risks associated with his condition, instead allowing him to grow and develop along a healthy trajectory. Johnson’s mother says, “We are concerned if our son does not get his spine corrected, it might affect his ability to walk. Please help my son.”

100% funded

$1,015raised
Fully funded