yun long
yun's Story

yun joined Watsi on October 14th, 2017. 3 other people also joined Watsi on that day! yun's most recent donation supported Kwan, a sweet and charming one-year-old from Thailand, to fund a CT scan so doctors can formulate an appropriate treatment plan.

Impact

yun has funded healthcare for 46 patients in 9 countries.

All patients funded by yun

Kwan is a sweet and charming one-year-old girl who loves to dance whenever she hears music! She also likes to play with coconut leaves and pretend she is cooking with them. She lives with her parents and four brothers in Thailand. Kwan’s family fled from Karen State, Burma in 2016 due to armed conflict in their area. Her two oldest brothers and her father all work as agricultural day laborers, her other two brothers currently attend school, and her mother works as a homemaker. Her parents share that their monthly income is enough for their basic day-to-day needs, and when they feel sick, they typically use traditional medicine to manage their symptoms. One year ago on March 1st, Kwan was born at Tha Song Yang Hospital. Immediately after birth, her mother noticed that she had a small lump between her eyes. The doctor diagnosed her with encephalocele, a condition that occurs when the neural tube does not close and causes a sac-like bulge with brain tissue and spinal fluid to poke through the skull. The mass is currently increasing in size and pressing on her nostrils. Doctors want Kwan to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which X-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $693 to cover the cost of Kwan's CT scan and care, which is scheduled for August 8th. Kwan's mother says, “I was so happy when I heard my daughter has donors who will help support her treatment. Every night I have prayed to God to help my daughter. I want to thank the organization and the donors so much for their kindness. I want my daughter to grow up the same as other people and go to school. I want her to become an educated person. I also want her to help poor communities.”

1%funded
$10raised
$683to go

Daw Moe is a 43-year-old mother from Burma who likes to listen to music in her free time. She lives with her husband and her two children. Both of her children had to stop going to school two years ago when she could no longer afford to pay for their school fees. Her husband sometimes works as a day laborer, and since unenrolling in school, her son now also works as a day laborer. Daw Moe has a cow, and they earn money by selling the cow’s milk. She would also help support her family by managing all of the household chores, but she has been unable to do much for the past five months due to her condition. Since then, her son and daughter have stepped up to help. Daw Moe has dealt with pain on the sole of her right foot since the end of January. The pain was initially caused by a blister, but even after seeking medical care at a hospital and treating the wound, the pain returned. She went back to the hospital about two months ago due to severe pain, and the doctor diagnosed her with a chronic ulcer. They gave her medications and cleaned the ulcer, but this did not heal her condition. The doctor told her that in order to properly heal, she would need to undergo a debridement, which is a procedure to remove any damaged or dead tissue. When she told the doctor that she could not pay for the surgery, the doctor referred her to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), for assistance accessing further treatment. Currently, Daw Moe’s right foot is in pain and swollen. She cannot walk and needs help using the restroom. To get around, she uses a wheelchair because she does not feel comfortable putting any weight on her right foot. She struggles sleeping at night because she feels saddened about her condition. She also can no longer help with household chores, so her son has to handle everything while her daughter looks after her in the hospital. Fortunately, BCMF is helping Daw Moe receive treatment. On July 8th, surgeons will perform a debridement to help relieve her pain and allow her to walk again. Now, Daw Moe needs help to fund this $694 procedure. Daw Moe expresses, “I feel pity on my son as he has to do everything when I am admitted at the hospital. He is also the sole bread winner, as my husband hardly works. I hope that I will get well soon so that I can go home and help him.”

13%funded
$95raised
$599to go

Snow is a 20-year-old woman who likes to play volleyball and the violin, listen to music, and weave traditional Karen clothes for herself. She currently lives with 36 other female students in her school’s dormitory, which is located in Burma. Originally from Mae La Oon Refugee Camp in Thailand, where her family still lives, she moved to the dormitory to study Women’s Leadership and Management at the beginning of this year. At the dormitory and school run by Karen Women’s Organization (KWO), she receives free food, tuition, and accommodations. Although she does not have a source of income, all of her basic needs are covered by KWO. After she graduates in April 2023, Snow plans to work with KWO for two years before moving back to the refugee camp to live with her family. This past June, Snow woke up feeling bloated in her abdominal area. A few days later, she also began experiencing pain in her lower left abdomen. After notifying a teacher, she was brought in to the free clinic, where she received an ultrasound and was informed that she has a cyst located on the left side of her lower abdomen. The medic notified her teacher that Snow would need to go across the border to Thailand to visit our medical partner's care center, Mae Sariang Hospital, for further investigation. When Karen Department of Health and Welfare (KDHW) was finally able to arrange transportation for Snow, she arrived at a KDHW safe house in Mae Sariang on August 1st. She visited Mae Sariang Hospital with a KDHW staff member the following day. After receiving an ultrasound and a blood test, Snow was diagnosed with an ovarian cyst on her left ovary. The doctor told her that she would need to undergo surgery to remove her left ovary. She may also require a partial hysterectomy, which is a procedure to remove the uterus, since the cyst is very large. However, they will only remove her uterus if absolutely necessary since they want to ensure she has the ability to have children in the future if she chooses to. Since Snow does not have a source of income, she is not able to fund her needed treatment on her own. Fortunately, KDHW staff referred her to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), for assistance in accessing further treatment. Snow is now scheduled to undergo an oophorectomy, the surgical removal of one or both of the ovaries, on August 10th. BCMF is requesting $1,005 to fund her needed surgery and care. Snow has had to take time off from her studies to seek medical care, but she plans to resume once she receives treatment. She shares that both she and her family have been worried since they learned that she will need surgery. Snow says, “I am worried about my condition, and I am worried that I will not recover. I have never been sick before, which makes me feel stressed about my condition.”

50%funded
$511raised
$494to go

Saw Eh is a two-year-old boy who lives with his mother and older sister in a refugee camp in Thailand. Both he and his older sister go to nursery school. His mother weaves and sells traditional Karen clothing to earn extra money in addition to the small amount they receive every month on a cash card. When Saw Eh was two months old, he began crying a lot and his mother noticed swelling in a sensitive area. He received medication at the hospital in the refugee camp, which helped alleviate his discomfort and crying. However, Saw Eh began experiencing pain in the same sensitive area this past June. This pain often causes him to miss school, as well as to cry frequently again. His mother shares that when he cries, she must hold him, meaning she no longer has time to weave clothes. During the short moments when the pain lessens after taking painkillers, Saw Eh loves playing with his friends and his sister. When his family brought him to the hospital, a medic told them that they would have to wait for a doctor to visit the refugee camp. When Saw Eh was finally seen by a doctor in late July, he and his family were referred to our medical partner's care center, Mae Sariang Hospital, for treatment. He was diagnosed with hydrocele in his left scrotum and a left inguinal hernia. Due to his severe condition, the doctor admitted him and scheduled his surgery to take place that same night, August 4th. However, Saw Eh's mother shares that she cannot pay for her son's needed treatment due to financial constraints. Fortunately, she was referred to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), for financial assistance accessing treatment. On August 4th, surgeons will perform hernia repair surgery to treat Saw Eh's hernia and help alleviate his symptoms. BCMF is requesting $1,486 to fund his surgery and care. Saw Eh’s mother shares, “I feel so sad when I see my son in pain. I love to see him playing with his sister, but if he is in pain, he will cry a lot.”

60%funded
$903raised
$583to go

Saw Wah is a 14-year-old student who lives with his parents and five younger brothers. He is in grade six, but his youngest brother is too young to enroll in school and his four other brothers stopped going to school earlier this year. It has been a challenging time in their region and Saw Wah shared: “They do not want to attend school because fighting happens very often in this area. We have to run and hide in the jungle where we study and they do not like to study in the jungle." Saw Wah’s family raises chickens and two goats to help feed their family. They also go fishing and foraging for vegetables in the jungle. His father works as a day laborer when there is no work on the farm, and even though Saw Wah's family does not have a regular income, they have enough food and receive free basic healthcare at a clinic near their village. A few years ago, Saw Wah developed a runny nose with yellowish nasal discharge. At first, he thought this was normal and would go away on its own, but towards the end of April, Saw Wah's nose became entirely blocked. He could no longer breath through it and lost all sense of smell. He finally told his parents about his symptoms, and his father took him to the free clinic where the medic checked his nostrils and found a mass blocking the nasal passage in both of his nostrils. Saw Wah was told he would need to go to a larger hospital for further investigation. Doctors want Saw Wah to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $693 to cover the cost of Saw Wah's CT scan and care, scheduled for June 27th. Saw Wah said, “I cannot breathe well especially at night... I want to receive surgery soon so that I will be able to breath normally again.”

27%funded
$190raised
$503to go

Yoon is a bright and loving 12-year-old girl. She lives with her mother and uncle in Karen State of Burma near the border with Thailand. She was a student in grade three but stopped studying in August 2020 when she was no longer able to walk. Yoon enjoys painting pictures and reading books. In the future, she wants to go back to school and continue her studies. She helps out her mother with household chores. Her uncle is unemployed whereas her mother is an agricultural day labourer. One day at home, Yoon fell down when she tried to stand up to go to the bathroom. Her feet felt painful and were pointing downwards. After that, she did not try to stand up again and would move around her house on her knees. Her mother would have to carry her to the bathroom. Due to their financial situation, her mother was not able to seek treatment despite being very worried for her daughter. Over time, Yoon noticed that her feet were increasingly pointing downwards and were stiff. Her legs would feel painful and were also stiff. Sometimes, she could not stretch out her legs due to feelings of tightness and pain. Her mom shared that she would cry whenever her legs pained, and she would have to wait until the pain lessened by itself. Additionally, her hands began to weaken until she could not hold food with her hands. At the same time, her speech became slurred and her voice became hoarse. On June 17, Yoon arrived at our medical partner's care center, Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH), and was admitted that same day. She received a physical examination and was diagnosed with cerebral palsy and tightness of Achilles tendon in both of her legs. The doctor recommended she receive surgery on both of her feet, which would help her walk again, and scheduled the procedure for June 21st. When Yoon’s mother told the doctor that they cannot afford to pay for surgery, the doctor referred Yoon to Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) for assistance accessing further treatment. Our medical partner, BCMF, is requesting $1,500 to cover the cost of an Achilles tendon lengthening procedure for Yoon. This procedure will elongate her Achilles tendon, allowing increased motion at the ankle joint. Without treatment, Yoon's condition will continue to cause her discomfort and will further limit her movement. Her mother said, “I cried almost every night when I saw my daughter in this condition. She always cried and complained about her feet. She always asked me to bring her to the hospital to get treatment. Whenever she asked me, I felt very sad and I would cry in secret. I want her to get treatment, but I cannot afford to pay for it. Due to COVID-19 and the current fighting in Burma, I cannot make enough money or save it. Often, I would only eat fishpaste and rice, but give her meat so that she can have something nutritious. When I heard that she has donors who will help her receive treatment, I felt very happy and thankful to BCMF for this kindness. I never thought she would receive such an opportunity. It makes me so happy that I do not know how to express it in words.”

66%funded
$1,003raised
$497to go

Naw En is a 31-year-old woman who lives with her husband, two sons and parents in a village in Karen State near the border of Burma and Thailand. Her husband and parents are subsistence farmers. Naw En is a village health worker, and her two sons are primary school students in the village. Although she earns around 100,000 kyat (approx. 100 USD) per month to support her family, she does whatever she can to only charge the villagers she treats for medications provided. Those who cannot afford to pay for the cost of medications are provided medication free of charge. Her family also raises chickens and pigs for their family to eat. The income Naw En earns is just enough to cover their daily expenses, but they have to borrow money to pay for anything else, like basic health care. Naw En learned she was pregnant last August 2021. She went to register her pregnancy at nearby Hlaingbwe Hospital, but the doctor told her to go to Hpa-An General Hospital when she told them that she had high blood pressure and previously needed a c-section delivery. When she went to Hpa-An General Hospital, a nurse told her to go to Taw Win Thu Ka Hospital because they were understaffed due to the coup and humanitarian crisis in their area. Finally, she then registered her pregnancy at Taw Win Thu Ka Hospital last November and received an ultrasound, blood test and urine test. The doctor gave her monthly follow-up appointments to check her high blood pressure and to check that her baby is in the right position. In January, Naw En learned that she will have a girl. “I was very happy to hear this as I already have two sons,” she said. Her doctor has now told her that she will need another c-section to ensure a safe delivery and unable to come up with the money needed, Naw En called her friend who works in Mae Sot to ask for help. Her friend told her about our medical partner Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) and that she may be able to find assistance in accessing her treatment. Currently, Naw En is taking medication for high blood pressure and feels tired when she walks. She can feel her baby kicking. When her blood pressure is high, she feels dizzy. She feels stressed each time she has to travel to the hospital, as it is located four hours from her home and cost 60,000 kyat (approx. 60 USD) just for the round-trip transportation. She is also worried about the cost of her c-section and that they would have to borrow money if they cannot find donors. In the future, she will continue to work as a village health worker. In her free times, she loves to spend time with her two sons and play with them. Naw En said, “I was happy when BCMF staff told me that donors will help pay for my c-section. Thank you so much to the donors for reliving me of my worries.” She also added, “I am very happy and excited to have a baby girl!”

62%funded
$826raised
$502to go

Dar is a 21-day-old baby girl who lives with her parents and her brother in a village in the border area of Karen State in Burma. Dar was born at home with the help of a traditional birth attendant. Two days after she was born, Dar's mother noticed a problem when Dar was passing stool. She told Dar’s father to call a medic from the clinic to their home. The medic realized that Dar was born with a anorectal condition and shared with Dar’s mother that baby Dar would urgently need surgery to receive a colostomy. Dar’s parents are subsistence farmers who grow rice and raise chickens. They also forage for vegetables in the jungle and go fishing when they want to eat fish. To purchase staples that they cannot produce such as salt and oil, Dar’s father works as an agricultural day labourer during the rainy season. However, since the rainy season has not yet begun, they currently have no income. However, their daily needs are fulfilled from living off the land. If they are sick and need to seek treatment, they go to the free clinic in their village run by Burma Medical Association (BMA). Fortunately our medical partner Burma Children Medical Fund is helping Dar's family access the medical care she needs. They need help raising $1,500 to fund the treatment she needs. “We had to borrow money so far for Dar’s treatment and my husband cannot work,” said Dar’s mother. “I want to send my baby to school until she graduates so that she can become educated. I want this for her future because I only went to school until grade four. After she completes her studies, she can become whatever she wants one day.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded