Anton de WinterMONTHLY DONOR
Anton's Story

Anton joined Watsi on April 8th, 2014. Eight years ago, Anton joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Anton's most recent donation traveled 8,700 miles to support Elinipa, a fun-loving toddler from Tanzania, to fund surgery so she can grow up walking and playing like other children.

Impact

Anton has funded healthcare for 96 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Anton

Elinipa is a beautiful two-year-old girl. She is an incredibly friendly child who loves to play with her five older siblings. At birth, she was a healthy child. It wasn't until she was learning to walk however, that her mother noticed that her legs were slightly curved, yet even so they did not seek treatment assuming it was a minor problem that she would outgrow. Elinipa has now been diagnosed with bilateral valgus, which is a condition caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result of her condition, Elinipa's legs bow inward to the point that her knees touch. This makes walking persistently more difficult as she continues to grow. Through our medical partner's outreach program her parents learned that their daughter needs surgery to correct her legs. Elinipa's parents are small scale famers who depend entirely on what they harvest to make a living. As a result, their income is not enough to afford to take Elinipa to the hospital to treat her condition. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Elinipa. The procedure is scheduled to take place on May 13th at our medical partner's care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre. With this treatment Elinipa's mobility will hopefully be restored, thus allowing her to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decreasing her risk of future complications. Elinipa’s father says, “I am worried with how her legs continue to bend inward. Please help us.”

40%funded
$360raised
$520to go

Ko Myo lives with his mother in a village in Burma. He used to be a motorcycle taxi driver but stopped working two months ago when his health deteriorated. His mother and wife currently care for him, washing clothes and working in a clothing factory in Yangon, earning income to support their family. With the help of Watsi donors, Ko Myo underwent his second round of laser treatment in January 2020, at Mae Sot Hospital in Thailand, to breakup stones in his left kidney. He was scheduled to undergo a third round of laser treatment however, when the Thai-Burma border closed in March 2020 due to increasing COVID-19 cases, Ko Myo was not able to go back to the hospital. He felt better until the first week of December 2021 when he started experiencing a lot of pain in his waist when he sat for a long time. With the border still closed and without enough money to go to a hospital, Ko Myo sought advice. He then went with our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, in Yangon to a clinic in January 2022 and was able to visit our partner's care center, Shin Par Ku Hospital. The doctor has told him he will need surgery on his left kidney to remove the stone and has scheduled him to have the procedure on February 6th. Currently, Ko Myo has little appetite and experiences pain in the left side of his back. He is eagerly awaiting surgery. He shared, "I pity my wife because she has to work hard and support me. Now, I am so happy that I will receive surgery soon," he said. "One day I want to open my own shop in the market and sew children's clothing."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Peace is a small scale farmer from Uganda. She got married in 2003, but separated from her husband 10 years later because she could not bear children for their family. She returned to her parents house who are small-scale farmers where she has since been assisting them on the farm. They sell farm produce for their daily basic needs. Four years ago, Peace began to experience troubling symptoms, including a neck swelling that has been progressively growing in size. She decided to see a doctor who confirmed she had a goitre. Peace was given treatment but the swelling didn't disappear, so she tried herbal medication but it did not help either. Currently, she experiences chest pains whenever she coughs, she cannot turn her neck comfortably, and she feels dizzy whenever she travels around. She also experiences airway blockage and has had to completely stop farming. Peace decided to visit Rushoroza Hospital at last to seek treatment. She was diagnosed with non-toxic goitre and after a review by the surgeon, a thyroidectomy is recommended. Peace needs surgery to prevent her symptoms from getting worse, however her family cannot afford the surgery. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Peace receive treatment. She is scheduled to undergo a thyroidectomy on October 5th at our medical partner's care center. Surgeons will remove all or part of her thyroid gland. This procedure will cost $333, and she and her family need help raising money. Pease says, “I hope to live a normal life again. I hope to get relieved of the neck swelling through surgery so that I can comfortably continue my day-to-day activities especially farming.”

$333raised
Fully funded

Queen is a six-year-old girl and the first born child in a family of two children. She and her younger brother are cared for by their grandparents as their mother sadly passed away in 2018 and their father is absent. Queen has been happily helping her grandmother with little home chores like washing dishes, sweeping the compound, and sometimes cooking. Both grandparents depend entirely on small scale farming of maize, vegetables, and bananas. As her name suggests, Queen is a nice and charming student who was to join first-grade early this year but unfortunately during the December holidays last year, she was involved in a painful fire accident. One day, Queen was helping her grandmother prepare porridge on a three stone fire place. Unknowingly, her dress caught on fire and badly injured her legs. Her wound healed, but burn scar contractures developed because of the tightened the skin around her legs. As a result, this has limited her ability to stand, walk, and enjoy her daily activities with her grandmother. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Queen receive treatment to relieve her pain. On August 5th, surgeons at their care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery to help her walk again. Now, she needs help to fund this $874 procedure. Queen’s uncle says: “She used to be the one helping her grandmother who has already aged up but with her condition right now her grandmother has to help her do everything. Please help my niece.”

$874raised
Fully funded