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Cindy Leschaud

Switzerland

Cindy's Story

Cindy joined Watsi on October 2nd, 2015. 12 other people also joined Watsi on that day! Cindy's most recent donation traveled 4,000 miles to support Queen, a baby girl from Tanzania, to fund hydrocephalus treatment.

Impact

Cindy has funded healthcare for 4 patients in 3 countries.

All patients funded by Cindy

Willis

Meet Willis, a 10-month-old Haitian boy with a congenital heart disease. Our medical partner, Haiti Cardiac Alliance (HCA), explains, “Willis was born with a cardiac condition called ventricular septal defect, in which a hole exists between the two lower chambers of his heart. Blood leaks through this hole without first passing through the lungs to obtain oxygen, leaving him sickly and weak.” HCA continues, “Willis lives with his mother and father and is their first child. His mother works as a market vendor, and his father repairs vehicles. Although the family has known about his heart problem since birth, they were first told that it would be better to do the surgery when Willis was slightly older. However, he recently became much sicker and is being rushed to surgery earlier than originally planned.” If Willis goes untreated, not only will he become sicker and weaker, but his condition will eventually be fatal. With $1,500 in Watsi funding, along with a $5,000 subsidy from Development for Freedom International, this outcome can be avoided. Willis will undergo open heart surgery, during which a portion of the outer lining of his heart will be sewn over the hole between the lower chambers to seal it. HCA predicts, “Following surgery, Willis should be able to lead a normal life with no further cardiac symptoms.” With treatment, 10-month-old Willis will be much safer and healthier. "I wish I could give gifts to everyone who is helping Willis get better, but I know that God will reward them all even if I can't," shares Willis’ mother.

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Brian

Brian, a 35-year-old Kenyan man, came to our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), seeking treatment for a leg injury sustained earlier this year in a hit-and-run accident involving a motorcycle. “Since then,” explains AMHF, “he is unable to work and relies solely on his family.” Brian’s condition, chronic osteomyelitis of the right tibia, is an infection of his lower leg bone resulting from his injury. Typical symptoms include recurring pain, redness, swelling, and bone loss. Currently, “Brian is experiencing pain and inability to use his right leg,” AMHF tells us. “If not treated, Brian is at risk of pathological fracture of the tibia.” Treatment of osteomyelitis is a surgical technique to regenerate bone lost as a result of the infection. In this technique—known as bone transport—an orthopedic surgeon breaks the involved bone and attaches the bone fragments to an external fixation device. As the fracture begins to heal, the external fixator is adjusted to pull the healing fracture apart approximately one millimeter per day. Separating the fragments in this manner promotes bone growth and results in the restoration of the lost bone over time. After the accident, Brian was treated surgically, but the procedure was unsuccessful, and he cannot pay for the additional surgery that he needs. $1,500 in funding pays for the bone transport surgery as well as 12 days of hospital care, antibiotic therapy, and physiotherapy. Brian’s family has saved $110 to cover additional costs associated with his care. “We expect after a bone transport, Brian's leg will heal,” shares AMHF. “He will be able to use his leg again. Brian will be able to work.” "I had planned to marry and provide for my family before this accident,” says Brian. “I really hope I will be able to do that after this surgery.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded