S

Stephen Nathan

MONTHLY DONOR

United States

Stephen's Story

Stephen joined Watsi on April 14th, 2013. Seven years ago, Stephen joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Stephen's most recent donation traveled 8,700 miles to support Saidi, a 23-year-old man from Tanzania, to fund an amputation of his left foot.

Impact

Stephen has funded healthcare for 219 patients in 15 countries.

All patients funded by Stephen

Saidi

Saidi is a 23-year-old from Tanzania who was born with spina bifida. He was able to have his spina bifida corrected when he was younger, which saved his life and allowed him to grow up to a strong young man. Saidi was able to go to school until class seven but was not able to continue with his education due to his parents' financial challenges. Saidi’s parents are small-scale farmers and have six children, of which Saidi is the third born child. Saidi used to join his parents in farming, but he had to stop and seek treatment because his legs and feet are bowed, which makes standing and walking very challenging. In 2014, Saidi came to our medical partner's care center to seek treatment because he had limb external rotation, which was causing him difficulty with walking and carrying out daily life activities. Through funding support, he was able to have his feet and legs corrected, and was able to resume normal life once more. Since then, over the last few years Saidi’s left foot has developed a serious infection that has struggled to heal. The infection would repeatedly start to heal but would return within five to six months, which makes it difficult for him to work and make a life for himself. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On January 19th, Saidi will undergo a left leg amputation below the knee to save him from the pain and suffering he is going through as doctors noted his foot can no longer be saved. Through this surgery, Saidi will eventually be able to use a prosthetic leg which will enable him to walk with ease and return to his daily life activities. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $1,088 to fund this procedure. Saidi shared, “Please help me as this foot has taken me through so much suffering and pain. I would like to be able to work and make a living for myself, but due to this infection I haven't been able to do that. Kindly help me.”

100% funded

$1,088raised
Fully funded
Neema

Neema is a 5-year-old girl and the firstborn to her mother who has three children. Neema started kindergarten earlier this year. She is a hard-working girl for her age, and looks after her siblings when her mother goes out to work on the farm. She also likes to help her mother clean their home and wash dishes. Neema was involved in a fire accident when she was one year old. She had been left in the care of an older child when her parents went out to work on the farm. As the children were playing, Neema walked into a dying fire that had been started to burn cow dung from the cattle shed. She was rescued by a passer-by and was rushed to the hospital, where she was admitted for two months. Neema's wounds healed, but contractures formed on a finger on her right-hand and the toes on her right foot. Her feet and toes are especially painful when she wears shoes and walks for a long distance. Neema's parents are not able to afford the cost of her procedure that will help to treat her contractures. They depend solely on livestock keeping and small scale farming for a living. Neema's parents had not been able to seek treatment for their daughter earlier due to the remoteness of their village, lack of proper medical facilities, and financial challenges. They appeal for help and support for their daughter's surgery. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Neema receive treatment. She is scheduled to undergo surgery to free up her thumb for better movement and amputate her littlest finger at our medical partner's care center. This procedure will cost $1,088, and she and her family need help raising money. Neema's father shared, “The fire accident has left my daughter with a disability. We hope for her to get treated but we cannot afford the cost. Please help us.”

69% funded

69%funded
$761raised
$327to go
Musinguzi

Musinguzi is a second-hand shoe vendor from Uganda. He's a married father to four and his wife is a primary school teacher. They own a three-room permanent house for their family's shelter. His eldest child is 16 years old and in secondary school, the second born is 8 years old and in primary school, the third born is 5 years old and in preschool while his youngest is 4 years old and hasn’t started school. Musinguzi is a second-hand shoe vendor and shared that it is challenging to gather school fees for his children and their family's other basic needs. Ten years ago, Musinguzi developed a small swelling on his left wrist that has been progressively increasing in size over time. At a certain point, he decided to use herbs but this did not help him. Two months ago he visited a physician who made a simple cut through the mass but this also did not help his condition either. He has pain whenever something presses on the swollen part of his wrist or whenever he twists his hand. He came to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Rushoroza Hospital to seek medical advice. If not treated with a mass excision surgery, he will continue experiencing the pain stopping him from comfortably doing his work. Musinguzi traveled to our medical partner's care center to receive treatment. On December 15th, surgeons will remove the mass. Now, Musinguzi needs help to raise $145 to fund this procedure. Musinguzi shared, “I have the fear that anything could come out of the swelling if not treated on time, I feel uncomfortable. I look forward to resuming my business as soon as possible.”

100% funded

$145raised
Fully funded
Emma

Looking jovial, 26-year-old Emma walks into the office wearing a broad smile. However, behind the joy and smile are recurring stomach pains that give her sleepless nights. Emma was diagnosed with symptomatic cholelithiasis - a gall bladder disorder that requires laparoscopic cholecystectomy analgesia surgery. If left untreated, cholelithiasis can lead to serious complications such as tissue damage, tears in the gallbladder, and infection that could spread spreads to other parts of her body. In Mid-April 2020, Emma started experiencing recurring pains burning in nature. She tried managing the pains using over the counter pain killers but the pain kept recurring. About a week later she was forced to visit a health centre in her home town Kayole for medical checkup. Emma was treated for suspected ulcers at the facility and was discharged with anti-acids. The pains seemed under control for over a month but they recurred in July. She went back to the same facility where a scan, x-ray, and further tests were recommended. Results indicated that she had cholelithiasis and she required urgent surgery. Doctors from the facility recommended she go to Kijabe Hospital for treatment. Emma is a single mother of one. She shared that she is raising her 6-month-old baby on her own after the father of the child left them and declined responsibility. She works as a shop attendant about 10km from her home and earns a total of $100 monthly income as her salary. To enable her to fend for the family, she has a house helper who takes care of her little child while she out looking for their daily bread. She pays the house help $35 a month. The three live in a single room rental which costs $50 a month. The remaining less than $20 is not enough to buy food and basic needs and still cover the cost of surgery. Emma is the oldest in a family of three. Her siblings are unemployed and live with their mother in the village. They depend on produce from their ¼ acre farm for survival. Emma’s employer and few close relatives contributed a small amount for the surgery but she still needs $616 in financial support to fund the treatment. Emma shared, “I need this surgery to get better and take care of my small family. I am the father and the mother to my little kid and my siblings depend on me. The small salary I get I barely make enough for our family and we basically live from hand to mouth. I have to spend all the income I make.”

100% funded

$616raised
Fully funded