Danny's Story

Danny joined Watsi on March 7th, 2015. Nine years ago, Danny joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Danny's most recent donation traveled 8,500 miles to support John, a resilient 11-year-old from Kenya, to fund clubfoot surgery.

Impact

Danny has funded healthcare for 113 patients in 14 countries.

Patients funded by Danny

John is a quiet 11-year-old boy from Kenya. John's story is a journey of compassion and the unwavering support of a dedicated well-wisher. His origin is drawn back in Tanzania, where he faced the disturbing reality of being disowned by his real parents due to his disability on his feet. John was left helpless in the unfamiliar surroundings of central Kenya. For the past seven years his guardian has stood by his side, offering not just a shelter but also a sense of belonging. John’s chapter started to change when a team of AIC Cure International doctors visited his neighborhood for a mobile clinic. He was reviewed and scheduled for surgery and underwent a successful surgery on his left foot and his left foot has healed well. John still has clubfoot of right foot. He is currently in the hospital to undergo right foot treatment, which involves serial casting to adjust the position of his foot to achieve the desired correction. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. This causes difficulty walking and even wearing shoes. Surgeons from our medical partner's care center, AIC Cure International Hospital are scheduled to now perform clubfoot repair surgery on February 19th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,286 to fund John's clubfoot repair. After treatment, he will be able to walk easily. Once he heals, John aspires to go back to school and study and one day achieve his dream of becoming a doctor in future. John told us: “I am looking forward to seeing my foot corrected, walking properly, playing football with my friends and continuing with my studies like other children, and achieving my dream of becoming a doctor in future to also impact lives of children born like me."

$638raised
$648to go

Reuben is a charming five-year-old boy from Karatu district in Tanzania, the third child born in a family of four children. He is a cheerful and active child, who particularly enjoys soccer. His family relies on farming for both sustenance and income, but the proceeds are often barely enough to meet the family's needs. Consequently, they struggle to meet medical expenses and are earnestly seeking assistance. Reuben was diagnosed with bilateral genu varus, a condition where legs curve outward at the knees while the feet and ankles touch. His legs began to bow out at the age of two, and as he continued to grow, this condition worsened, making it challenging for him to walk long distances. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, his walking became energy-intensive, and he developed an uncomfortable gait. Recently, these mobility issues have significantly impacted his participation in beloved activities like playing soccer. Concerned about the potential hindrance this untreated condition may pose when Reuben begins school, especially due to the pain he experiences while walking and the distance of the school from home, his parents sought treatment at a local hospital. However, they were compelled to halt the treatment due to the high treatment costs. Their knowledge of our medical partner's care center, Kafika House, stemmed from a doctor who attended to Reuben two years ago. Consequently, they have embarked on a quest for his medical treatment again. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Reuben receive treatment. On May 7th, surgeons will perform a reconstructive surgery that will restore Reuben's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Now, Reuben's family needs help to fund this $880 procedure. Ruben’s father says: “I hope my son will get treatment to correct his legs so that it is easy for him when he starts school.”

$234raised
$646to go

Lourdez is a mother of three from the Philippines. Currently, her family depends on the income of their second child, who works as a call center agent. Lourdez shared that this income is not enough for the family's expenses and hopes that, after her treatment, she will be able to work and help earn money to support her family. Seven months ago, Lourdez began to experience troubling symptoms, including unbearable stomach pain that lasted for hours. She immediately consulted with a doctor. However, she knows her family cannot afford the cost of surgery, so she had to look for other treatment options. Fortunately, a friend brought her to one of our care centers, where the doctors advised Lourdez to undergo a cholecystectomy, the surgical removal of the gallbladder. If left untreated, her symptoms will continue to worsen and put her at risk for further health complications in the future. After seeking treatment through our medical partner, World Surgical Foundation Philippines (WSFP), Lourdez is scheduled to undergo a cholecystectomy on December 13th. The Philippine Health Insurance Corporation is supporting a portion of the cost of the procedure. WSFP is requesting $1,128 to cover the remaining cost of her surgery and care. Lourdez said, "This treatment will be a great help, not just for me but for my family. We have no other means of funding my surgery. As a basic earner, my daughter's income is often not enough for our family's needs and expenses. The free surgery would be a blessing and an opportunity for me to help my daughter earn for the family."

$1,128raised
Fully funded

Ko Tin is a 34-year-old man from Burma. He lives with his parents and his younger brother in a village in Yangon Division, Burma. He used to be a driver before his condition got worse but now he has stopped. Currently, Ko Tin is living with his parents who are farmers and support him. The whole family’s income is just enough for their basic expenses and basic health care. Ko Tin has a wife who went to Thailand for work about four months ago but he has lost contact with her. When he has the energy and free time, Ko Tin likes playing football with friends. Ko Tin was diagnosed with a heart condition that requires replacement of the mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. In mid October, Ko Tin experienced fever, cough, body pain, difficult breathing, and severe fatigue when he walks a short distance. After he visited the cardiologist in Yangon Hospital, he was diagnosed with mitral valve regurgitation and doctor recommend that he should receive surgery. Currently, Ko Tin feels tired, coughs often, and is experiencing difficult breathing. Sometimes, he feels pain from his legs and his arms, and he cannot sleep well at night. He will feel extremely fatigued with shortness of breath when he lays down on the floor. He also cannot walk long distances. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Ko Tin. The treatment is scheduled to take place at Pun Hlaing Hospital on December 3rd and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. Ko Tin said, “I would like to recover as soon as possible. My parents are worried about me, and they have difficulty earning enough money to pay for my treatment. I hope my wife to return, and I would like to live as a happy family.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Janet is an 18-year-old student and the second of three children in her family. Her parents do not have regular employment but do work whenever they can get it at a neighboring flower farm. Janet was doing well in her early years, but in 2020, she began falling, and started experiencing headaches, with symptoms similar to epilepsy. Sometimes her eyes were affected, causing blurred vision. She began falling more frequently, and she was admitted to Kenyatta National Hospital, where a brain tumor was diagnosed. Janet had a successful craniotomy (brain surgery). Following the surgery, she developed a limping gait, had difficulty talking, and experienced non-typical body movements. Over time, she seems to have improved as she continues with therapy. Janet started experiencing new symptoms just a few weeks ago. She began crying at night but could not explain her problem. Eventually, it was determined that her left hand was not straightening out and it was suspected that Janet may have fallen and broken her hand without knowing it. An x-ray showed a closed fracture dislocation of the left elbow. Janet's mother was advised to bring her to our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), and their care center. The surgeon has recommended an Open Reduction Internal Fixation (ORIF). This surgery will hopefully mend Janet's elbow. If not treated, Janet will continue to have pain. She may not be able to use her hand, and the fracture may develop malunion, or a permanent deformed healing. Fortunately, surgeons at AMH can help. On September 5th, Janet will undergo surgery. AMH is requesting $1,049 to fund this fracture repair procedure. Unfortunately, the family is not in a position to meet this cost. “My daughter does not even understand what is going on because of her other condition, but I plead for her support so that she can be able to use her hand in the future,” said Janet’s mother.

$1,049raised
Fully funded