Lorenz WagenerMONTHLY DONOR
Lorenz's Story

Lorenz joined Watsi on June 6th, 2015. One year ago, Lorenz joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Lorenz's most recent donation traveled 1,600 miles to support Nin, an active athlete from Cambodia, to fund a nerve reconstruction surgery to restore use of his arm and hand.

Impact

Lorenz has funded healthcare for 60 patients in 11 countries.

All patients funded by Lorenz

Suraiya is a young three-year-old girl and the last born child in a family of two. Her parents depend on small scale farming of maize and vegetables to feed their family and they sell the surplus to make ends meet. Suraiya's mother also sells food at a local food joint commonly known as Mama Ntilie to supplement their income. Suraiya was diagnosed with bilateral genu varus. She is currently having a hard time walking due to her legs bending outwardly. Her mother noticed the condition when Suraiya learned to stand and walk. They tried to seek treatment for her at the district hospital but the cost was too high for them to afford. They were advised to get national health insurance for her but due to financial challenges, they could not afford to get the insurance. During a medical outreach program organized by Plaster House, Suraiya's parents were advised to take her to ALMC Hospital for review. Her condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. Over the years Suraiya's legs have worsened making walking more difficult and painful for her. Suraiya and her family are appealing for help for her to be treated. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Suraiya. The procedure is scheduled to take place on August 19th. Treatment will hopefully restore Suraiya's mobility, allow her to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease her risk of future complications. Suraiya’s mother says, "Money to cover our daughter’s treatment cost has been our biggest challenge because the cost is too high for us to afford. Please help treat our daughter.”

$880raised
Fully funded

Shoh is a 47-year-old man who lives with his wife, two sons, daughter-in-law and two daughters in Nu Poe Refugee Camp in Thailand. In the camp, Shoh and his oldest son are teachers who teach about the Quran for other refugees. They each earn 1,200 baht (approx. 40 USD) per month. His wife is often sick, and his eldest daughter has to look after her at home. His daughter-in-law is a homemaker while his youngest daughter and son are students. Shoh’s household receives 1,110 baht (approx. 37 USD) every month on a cash card to purchase rations in the camp. Their monthly household income is just enough to cover their daily expenses as they also receive free basic health care and education in the camp. Since February 2020, Shoh has had umbilical hearnia. Currently, Shoh’s abdomen pain is not severe but his hernia is still increasing in size. He feels uncomfortable when he walks because of his swollen abdomen. He cannot sleep well and is increasingly worried about his diagnosis. The pain in his abdomen increases when he feels cold, especially at night. Fortunately, on March 9th, he will undergo hernia repair surgery at Mae Sot General Hospital, our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund Shoh's hernia repair surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on March 9th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. Shoh said, “I do not want to stop being a teacher. I love teaching the Quran to young children. Also, if I do not teach, I do not earn an income and my family does not have enough income to cover our household expenses.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Ko is a 37-year-old father of five who lives with his wife, three daughters and two sons in a refugee camp in Thailand. His family receives a cash card every month from an organization, but this is not enough to cover their expenses. Therefore, he also works as an agricultural day laborer in a nearby Thai village. In his free time, Ko enjoys playing cane ball and spending time with his friends. On December 11, 2020, Ko slipped and fell onto rocks outside of the camp. When he tried to get up, Ko could tell that his leg was broken. He went to the hospital in the refugee camp run by Malteser International (MI). He was eventually referred to a hospital where he underwent surgery to insert a metal rod into his leg on December 25, 2020. When he went back to the hospital for his follow-up appointment on February 3, 2021, the doctor observed that the surgical wound was infected and he underwent surgery to clean his wound. When the wound still did not heal, the doctor referred him to another hospital, where the doctor told him he would need an additional surgery to remove necrotic tissue and replace the rod in his leg. Currently, Ko is experiencing a lot of pain. It is difficult for him to walk and he is worried about his family in the camp. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Ko will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and finally heal. This procedure will allow Ko to walk and his leg to heal properly. The procedure is scheduled for March 12th and will cost $1,500. Ko shared, “I really want to work to support my family as soon as possible. I cannot imagine what life would be like for my family if my leg never heals.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Ry is a 26-year-old construction worker from Cambodia. He has been married for three years and has a one-year-old son, and their family currently lives with his parents. His wife is a farmer. In Ry's free time, he likes watching TV, playing games on his phone, and caring for his son. Three months ago, Ry was in a construction accident that caused a severe laceration on his right neck and paralysis of his right shoulder and elbow. After the accident, his family took him to the hospital where he had nerve repair treatment and wound closure. Ry stayed there for one month, before returning home. Still not feeling well, he traveled to Watsi's Medical Partner Children's Surgical Center to receive treatment. Doctors diagnosed him with a brachial plexus injury on his right shoulder side. The brachial plexus is a nerve network that transmits signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Injuries to this nerve network can result in loss of function and sensation. Ry is unable to lift his arm and he cannot work. On January 12th, Ry will undergo a brachial plexus repair surgery. Surgeons plan to do a spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve transfer, referred to as an Oberlin transfer. After recovery, he will be able to use his arm and shoulder normally again. Our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre, is requesting $696 to fund this procedure. Ry shared, "I hope that after surgery, my right shoulder and elbow will get back to their full function and I can work as I did before."

$696raised
Fully funded