Profile 132x132 bass fam 2020

The Bass Family

MONTHLY DONORBellingham, Washington

United States

The's Story

The joined Watsi on September 19th, 2016. Four years ago, The joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. The's most recent donation traveled 8,600 miles to support Saw Moo, a 7-year-old refugee from Thailand, to fund retina reattachment surgery so he can see clearly.

Impact

The has funded healthcare for 42 patients in 10 countries.

All patients funded by The

Maxwell

Maxwell is a 10-month-old from Kenya. His mother shared that he's already a playful and jovial boy together with his twin. Unfortunately, she said, his curiosity accidentally caused him to get a burn on his chest, abdomen, right arm and his feet. If left untreated, he could suffer from long-term tissue damage, prolonged pain, and infections. Maxwell requires a split-thickness skin graft surgery to help heal the burns and reduce the infections. On December 3rd, Maxwell was playing with his twin brother when he pulled down a cup containing hot tea from the table. The hot beverage spilled and burned his body. He was rushed to St Joseph Hospital in their home village of Kangemi and was treated in the emergency phase, and was later referred to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Kijabe Hospital the additional care he needs. At Kijabe Hospital, Maxwell has had debridement and endoscopy procedures. However, he still requires skin grafting which is scheduled at the end of the week. Since admission, Maxwell has already accrued a bill that his family is working hard to raise, but they are having difficulties. They are requesting Watsi's assistance for his his skin graft surgery. Maxwell has three other siblings and his mother stays at home watching them and taking care of their daily tasks. Their family relies on their father's income for survival and upkeep. Maxwell's father is a taxi driver in Kangemi, who earns a daily allowance depending on the availability of work. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Maxwell receive treatment. On December 17th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to The surgery will reduce the chances of infection. Now, Maxwell needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. Maxwell's mother says, “My baby has been in pain since the unfortunate accident occurred. I know he misses playing with his brother because they are very jovial together. We already have a huge bill that we are unable to afford. We need help with this surgery.”

100% funded

$1,185raised
Fully funded
Peter

Peter is a 46-year-old man from Kiambu County in Kenya. He works mostly in construction sites as a manual laborer. Peter is the second born in a family of eight. He was hit by a motorbike while crossing the road on July 27th, 2020. He was taken to a nearby hospital where an x-ray confirmed he had sustained a fracture of his left femur. An ORIF surgery was recommended but he could not afford the cost of surgery. Peter had been on traction to help treat his fracture since his admission at a government hospital. A recent standoff between the county government and health workers led to a go-slow, which has prompted patients like Peter to seek treatment elsewhere since they cannot access care currently. Peter came to our medical partner's facility and saw the surgeon who again also recommended an ORIF procedure. Peter hopes that he finally has the life-changing surgery that will restore full functionality of his leg and enable him to go back to work. If not treated Peter’s fracture may fail to unite or mal-unite leading to loss of function of his left lower limb. He is not able to personally raise the amount required for surgery given that he is a casual laborer with minimal income.  Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On October 19th, Peter will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. The surgery will allow him to walk with ease and reduce the instance of complications. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,049 to fund this procedure. “I have been in hospital and unable to provide for myself since the accident in July. I hope that the operation will enable me to walk again so that I can fend for myself once more,” Peter said.

100% funded

$1,049raised
Fully funded
Zin Oo

Zin Oo is a 36-year-old man who lives with his mother, younger sister, and his seven-year-old son in Mawlamyine, Burma. He is an assistant truck driver and he earns 4,000 kyat (approx. 4 USD) per day. Since the outbreak of CVOID-19, there is less work and he is only able to earn 64,000 kyat (approx. 64 USD) in a month. Zin Oo's son goes to primary school and his wife passed away last year. His mother goes house to house to see if anyone would hire her to wash their clothes. His younger sister lost her job at the factory after the outbreak of COVID-19 in Yangon. Since April, she looks after the household chores and she also works as a day laborer when she can find work. Zin Oo’s combined household income of 124,000 kyat (approx. 150 USD) in a month is just enough for their daily expenses and they cannot afford to pay the costs of basic healthcare. On August 3rd, Zin Oo was cutting firewood with an axe. While cutting the logs, his aim was off and he hit his fingers on his right hand against the log. His fingers became swollen and red after the accident, especially his small and index fingers. Without enough money to go to the hospital, Zin Oo bought traditional medicine and applied it to his fingers. He felt like his middle and ring fingers healed but his small and index fingers became more swollen and painful. Eventually when he noticed pus on his fingers, he told his friend about his problem and his friend suggested he go to Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH), where treatment often cost less than other hospitals. At MLCH, the doctor completed a detailed assessment of his right hand and diagnosed him with cellulitis, a serious bacterial skin infection. The doctor told him that because of poor blood supply, he would need to amputate his small finger and probably his index finger as well. When Zin Oo told the doctor that he does not have any money to pay for the surgery, the doctor referred him to Watsi's Medical Partner Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) for assistance accessing treatment. Currently, the fingers on Zin Oo’s right hand are red, swollen, and warm to the touch. His fingers hurt a lot, especially his small and index finger. He cannot sleep at night without taking pain medication. He is not able to eat food with his right hand and he feels uncomfortable eating with his left hand since he is right-handed. Aside from this, Zin Oo feels stressed about his condition. He cannot work and his mother has to help look after him since he was admitted at the hospital. His mother then has no income while he receives treatment. They are worried that they will not have enough money for food and for Zin Oo’s treatment. In the future, Zin Oo wants to work as a truck driver to earn money for his family. Once he has fully recovered, he will accept any work he can find as he looks for a job as a truck driver. Zin Oo’s younger sister shared with us, “Now, I have to take care of my nephew while my mother accompanies my brother [Zin Oo] at the hospital. I cannot work and our family is worried about money. We owe our neighbor 50,000 kyat [approx. 50 USD] and we have to pay it back with 20% interest.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded