Bleees' Story

Bleees joined Watsi on May 28th, 2020. One year ago, Bleees joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Bleees' most recent donation traveled 6,200 miles to support Roth, a construction worker from Cambodia, to fund a fracture repair so he can walk and work again.

Impact

Bleees has funded healthcare for 23 patients in 5 countries.

All patients funded by Bleees

Naomi is a 15-year-old girl from Kenya. She is a very fun, talkative, and outgoing girl. In school, she is in Grade 5 and is among some of the best students in her class. Naomi is the sixth born in a family of seven children. Some of her siblings are in college with different sponsorship programs, while others are in high school and primary school. Naomi’s father works hard finding labor jobs to provide for their family. Her mother currently stays at home to mainly take care of Naomi, as she is not able to go to school at the moment. Naomi has a history of spina bifida and hydrocephalus. In 2019, when her shunt that was helping treat her hydrocephalus unfortunately started malfunctioning, her mother brought her to a facility to see a neurosurgeon. At the facility, Naomi was admitted as an emergency case and was operated on successfully. After the surgery, she had a lengthy stay at the facility and was in and out of the Intensive Care Unit several times. During this time, Naomi was bedridden and developed two pressure sores in the process; one on the sacral and the other one on the right gluteal region. The medical practitioners in the facility were not able to offer any treatment for her pressure sores. As time went by, the pressure sores worsened and grew deeper. One medical practitioner advised Naomi’s mother to dress the wounds with vinegar and honey on a daily basis. Her mother tried this and noticed some small improvement. Until she had enough money to take Naomi to the hospital, she continued with this home treatment. Eventually, Naomi was brought to our Medical Partner Kijabe Hospital, where doctors examined her. Now, Naomi will undergo a colostomy conducted by the pediatric surgery team to divert the stool and avoid infection. Later, she will undergo debridement and flap reconstruction with the plastic surgery team to help her heal. However, Naomi's parents are unable to afford the cost of her care. Their family has a National Health Insurance Fund coverage that will help fund her later reconstruction procedures, but they need help raising money for the procedures Naomi must undergo now. Naomi’s mother appeals for financial support. Naomi will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare. She is scheduled to undergo her colostomy surgery on April 13th. African Mission Healthcare is requesting $592 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Once recovered, she will be free of pain and will be able to return to her studies again. Naomi’s mother shared, “Since Naomi was born, I knew that this was a God-given responsibility to take care of her and be with her throughout her treatment. Over the years, it is been difficult because of the cost of treatment as a result of several trips to seek care. She really needs this surgery but sadly we are I am unable to facilitate for it.”

$592raised
Fully funded

Victor is a student and the oldest of six in his family who live together in a grass thatched house. His parents are farmers in the village, and they grow maize and beans for their family’s upkeep. Victor was born with a complete absence of fingers on his left hand, which has forced him to learn how to do all tasks with his right hand including cooking and laundry. On March 11th, 2021, eighteen-year-old Victor was injured in a motorcycle road traffic accident. He was a passenger when the motorcycle slid on mud and fell. He sustained an injury on his lower leg, and his leg was placed in a cast shortly after the accident. A few weeks later, his condition worsened and his wounds started having signs of infection. His parents brought him to the hospital, where doctors conducted an X-ray which revealed a left tibia-fibula fracture. Victor is in pain and unable to walk. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On March 25th, Victor will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. After healing, Victor will be able to walk again and engage in his normal activities. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $1,014 to fund this procedure and his family has been able to contribute $100. Victor is a diligent student, and he scheduled his surgery to begin after he sits for his final exams. He says, “I would have wished to undergo the surgery as soon as possible but I am sitting for my exams this coming week. My prayer is that I won’t be in so much pain so that I can sit for my exams comfortably.” Victor’s mother is appealing to anyone reading his son's story to help her raise money for a successful surgery.

$1,014raised
Fully funded

Daw Mya is a 59-year-old woman from Burma. She lives with her daughter, granddaughter, son, daughter-in-law, and grandson in Yangon, Burma. Daw Mya is currently too ill to work, but her daughter works as a seamstress in a factory. Her granddaughter goes to school, her son is a taxi driver, her daughter-in-law looks after their son at home. Her daughter and her son both help look after Daw Mya and try to support her as best they can. Daw Mya was diagnosed with a heart condition that involves a malformation of the mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. Currently, Daw Mya feels tired and experiences heart palpitations with chest pain. She has no appetite and cannot sleep well at night, and both of her legs are swollen. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Daw Mya. The treatment is scheduled to take place on February 21st and, once completed, will hopefully allow her to live more comfortably. Daw Mya said, “I want to get better soon so that I can help my family. I want to help them because my daughter-in-law is always looking after me and her child [my grandson], so she cannot work. If I can look after the household chores and take care of the family, they can go to work and earn more income for our family. I cannot go anywhere because of my condition. They always take care of me and they spend too much of their money on me.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Scholastica is a 6-month-old baby girl from Tanzania. She is the last born in a family of six children. Scholastica was born a healthy child but, at four months of age, her mother noticed her head was growing very fast and she was not able to support it. They could not afford the cost of seeking care at the regional hospital at the time. Scholastica's parents are small scale farmers and work hard to make ends meet with their income. Eventually, they were able to get some money from relatives and took her back to the regional hospital. There, Scholastica was diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. Without treatment, Scholastica will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Unfortunately, she was not able to get an appointment at the regional hospital for a long time. As time went on, Scholastica's condition grew worse. Her head increased in size and her eyes began rolling down. Though they were concerned, her parents could not raise money to seek an alternative hospital for care. Eventually, their friend referred them to our medical partner's care center, ALMC Plaster House. Their friends and neighbours supported them with bus fare for the two-day journey to the hospital. Now, she is scheduled for an ETV surgery to treat her condition, and the family appeals for financial support for this procedure. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,300 to cover the cost of ETV surgery for Scholastica that will treat her hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 25th and will drain the excess fluid from Scholastica's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve her quality of life. It will also reduce the likelihood of severe fevers, vomiting, and potential brain damage. With proper treatment, Scholastica will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young girl. Scholastica’s mother shared, "We travelled for two days because we were told there is hope for my daughter to get help. Please help save her.”

$1,300raised
Fully funded