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Donate joined Watsi on July 29th, 2015. 64 other people also joined Watsi on that day! Donate's most recent donation supported Sucely, a baby from Guatemala, to treat acute malnutrition.

Impact

Donate has funded healthcare for 8 patients in 5 countries.

patients you have funded

Meet Sucely, a one-year-old girl from Guatemala. Our medical partner, Wuqu’ Kawoq (WK), describes Sucely as an “active and well-tempered child,” who laughs frequently and enjoys playing with dolls. Sucely lives on a compound-style property with her extended family. “Her aunts, uncles, cousins, and grandmother all participate and contribute to the general well-being of family and spend lots of quality time together,” says WK. Recently, Sucely’s parents have been extremely worried about their youngest daughter, who hasn’t been growing like her two older brothers did. After examining Sucely, WK diagnosed her with acute malnutrition. Sucely does not consume enough food, and she is unable to retain nutrients due to parasitic disease and bacterial infection. If left untreated, Sucely’s malnutrition could lead to extreme dehydration, a compromised immune system, and death. According to Sucely’s mother, “We have a lot of family and so our resources are spread very thin.” Sucely’s father is a part-time carpenter, but he does not make enough to cover the costs of her treatment. For $535, we can help Sucely get the life-saving help she needs. “This treatment will supply Sucely with growth monitoring, micronutrient and food supplementation, and medication for her to recoup some of the weight and height she has lost and increase her overall caloric intake,” says WK. Moreover, her parents will receive “intensive nutrition education, thus building their confidence and ability to care for Sucely throughout her childhood.” Sucely’s mother shares, “Thank you so much for finding us. I am worried because our other two children were not like this. We are excited to learn.” Let’s help give Sucely the opportunity to develop normally and live a healthy, happy life!

$535raised
Fully funded

Cosmas, a shy but ambitious 16-year-old boy from Tanzania, lives with his parents and five siblings. According to our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), Cosmas, “has big dreams of becoming an engineer.” AMHF adds that Cosmas “enjoys mathematics, science and history.” After studying, Cosmas loves playing football. Due to a unilateral clubfoot—Cosmas is unable to attend school and play soccer with his friends. Clubfoot is a condition in which the connecting tendons between the leg and foot are tighter than usual, causing the foot to turn inward. “Cosmas is using the lateral aspect of his right foot for walking, which has affected his gait. He is also unable to wear shoes,” AMHF tells us. If left untreated, Cosmas’ condition can increase the risk of him developing premature osteoarthritis. Although his parents are supportive, AMHF states that they are “small scale farmers, relying on growing and selling maize, beans and green bananas.” As such, their income alone is insufficient to cover the cost of Cosmas’ treatment and provide for the rest of the family as well. With $1,160, Cosmas will undergo an operation to surgically correct his clubfoot. Included in the cost of treatment, Cosmas will be fitted for a foot abduction brace. To support his recovery, Cosmas will spend a minimum of three months at Plaster House—a rehabilitation program. At Plaster House, Cosmas will receive specialist support and therapy to help him regain use of his foot. After he recovers, AMHF expects, “Cosmas’ gait will improve and he will be able to walk again.” Cosmas shares, “I am very passionate about playing football. I wish I could play competently and also go back to school.”

$1,160raised
Fully funded

Meet Adrian, a three-year-old boy from Tanzania. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), says, “Adrian likes being around other children and to play, he especially enjoys scribbling things on a piece of paper, coloring some pictures, and playing with Lego blocks.” When Adrian was two years old, “His mother saw that her son’s legs were unusually bowing outwards and that his gait was gradually changing; she started giving him some multivitamins and other herbal remedies, but nothing helped,” AMHF explains. Adrian has a condition called bilateral genu varus. This is the misalignment of the knee joint and femur, common in Tanzania as a result of the high levels of fluoride in the water. AMHF reports, “Adrian is unable to walk properly, he wiggles when walking and sometimes he falls down when he tries to run – if not treated, Adrian will have an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis at a young age.” Adrian needs a surgery called an osteotomy to re-align the bones and the joint. $940 will fund Adrian’s surgery, hospital stay, antibiotics, painkillers and recovery care. Funding also provides for Adrian’s four-month stay at Plaster House—a rehabilitation facility in which medical staff supervise the children’s care, while housemothers look after them on a daily basis. Adrian’s mother says, “I just hope that his legs can be straightened so that he can continue with normal growth, have the ability to walk to school and do other things like his siblings.”

$940raised
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Meet Diana, a bright, five-year-old girl from Kenya. Diana and her family live in a two room traditional hut and she has three siblings currently enrolled in school. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), informs us that she was brought to their hospital last night in critical condition, and is currently in the ICU. “Diana has been suffering severe headaches, an inability to walk, persistent vomiting, and drowsiness,” AMHF reports. Sadly, these symptoms are the result of a brain tumor. The tumor was first noticed in nursery school when her symptoms began. Over the last few years, “her parents sought medical intervention from several hospitals but her condition got worse,” AMHF says. Diana’s father works on his own tea farm and her mother is a housewife. All of the family’s savings have been used paying for Diana’s medical bills. AMHF reports, “they sold the few livestock they had to get treatment for little Diana.” Diana needs a craniotomy to remove her tumor. $1,260 in funding will pay for the MRI or CAT scan needed to isolate the tumor, the craniotomy to remove it, and Diana’s post-operative recovery in the ICU. AMHF reports, “If treated, Diana will be relieved from the risk of experiencing high intra-cranial pressure and it will also minimize the risk of developing brain damage or becoming visually impaired.” Diana’s mother shares, “I really hope that little Diana gets well, we love her so much."

$1,260raised
Fully funded

Meet, Alinafe, a one-year old baby girl living in Malawi. To support the family, “Alinafe’s mother runs a small scale business to earn their living,” shares our medical partner, World Altering Medicine (WAM). At a crucial point in her early childhood development, Alinafe has experienced growth issues as a result of a condition called hydrocephalus. Alinafe was brought to WAM’s clinic when her mother observed a growth on her head. A medical examination confirmed the diagnosis of hydrocephalus. Hydrocephalus is a rare neurological medical condition caused by a fluid buildup in a localized area of the brain. Without intervention, the pressure and fluid buildup can lead to long term health complications, especially throughout important stages of childhood development. At this point, Alinafe is beginning to have problems with her vision and is experiencing issues with walking. With, $992, Alinafe will undergo surgery to drain the excess fluid from her brain. This procedure will be done by means of an endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV), which will naturally drain out the blocked fluid. In addition to her operation, Alinafe will receive seven days of hospitalized care as well as all of the necessary preoperative and postoperative examinations required for a safe surgery. This procedure is expected to have a great impact on Alinafe’s childhood growth and overall health, allowing her to “regain her sight and start walking again,” comments WAM. “I am hopeful to have the surgery done,” Alinfe’s mother shares.

$992raised
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Meet Mwanakombo, a six-year-old girl from Kenya. Mwanakombo lives with her parents and is “the firstborn child in a family of three children,” shares our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). “Mwanakombo is now at a school-going age,” AMHF continues. However, Mwanakombo has been unable to pass stool on her own due to an anorectal malformation, and she “often misses school because of discomfort and irritation.” A congenital anorectal malformation is a condition whereby the anal region fails to properly develop in utero. Although cases vary and some patients are born with anal openings smaller than usual, AMHF reports, “Mwanakombo was born without an anal opening.” When she was just one month old, Mwanakombo received a colostomy to allow her to pass stool. However, this procedure is far from sustainable and puts Mwanakombo at risk of exposure to various infections as she continues to grow. In addition, “The colostomy makes it difficult for Mwanakombo to interact with other children freely,” explains AMHF. A two-stage complete anal malformation corrective surgery is required to allow Mwanakombo to pass stool independently. $1,260 will fund the entire procedure. First, she will receive an anorectoplasty to move her bowel to its correct position. Following that procedure, Mwanakombo will undergo a colostomy, which will enable her to pass stool without any assistance. In addition to freeing her from discomfort, this correction will give Mwanakombo independence and confidence. “The treatment will enable Mwanakombo to pass stool normally,” AMHF predicts. “She will be able to go back to school and interact freely with others.” Mwanakombo’s mother shares, “My wish is to see my daughter treated so that she can continue with her schooling. She loves going to school but is finding it difficult to adjust.”

$1,260raised
Fully funded

“John is a beautiful little boy living with his father,” shares our medical partner in Haiti, Project Medishare (PM). Just eight years old, John is in severe respiratory distress. “Twelve months ago John fell on a rock while biking in his neighborhood, and his parents did not take him to the hospital because they did not have money and it was not severe,” PM explains. “A few days later John started having difficulties breathing and his belly, face and foot started swelling.” When his father saw this, he took John to the hospital where he was given oxygen. However, pus in his right lung is still preventing him from breathing normally. In order for John to recover, he must receive surgery to remove the pus. “John's father is working very hard to raise money for him,” PM tells us. “He has to walk under the hot sun of Haiti every day, selling used stuff.” John’s father shares, “I fix stuff I find to sell in order to get money to feed my kid. I only came to the hospital with John hoping to receive free care because he was very sick; when they said to me that it is a private hospital and that I have to pay, I thought about going back home because I have no money. 
” Thankfully, John’s father does not have to take his son home. With $1,500 in funding, PM explains, “Treatment will consist of a thoracic drainage by surgical intervention.” First, the pus will be drained from John’s lung. Second, John will be given antibiotics to treat the infection. Finally, he will rejoin his family and resume his healthy life. “This surgery will save John’s life,” PM shares. Let’s fund this life-saving treatment and allow John to live a normal childhood—without pain and respiratory distress.

$1,500raised
Fully funded