Fahd ButtMONTHLY DONOR
Fahd's Story

Fahd joined Watsi on November 5th, 2014. Eight years ago, Fahd joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Fahd's most recent donation traveled 8,500 miles to support Abraham, a father, farmer, and construction worker from Kenya, to fund a fracture surgery so he can walk easily again.

Impact

Fahd has funded healthcare for 95 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Fahd

Abraham is a 27-year-old farmer from Kenya. He is a happy and joyful man who loves smiling. Abraham is married with two sons aged six and three years. He also does construction work when he can find jobs on local building projects. His wife sells secondhand clothes at the local markets around. Abraham and his family live in a rental house which has two rooms. He works hard but it has been difficult to earn a living and pay his monthly bills. Earlier last year, Abraham was among the people who got sponsorship from the county to study in technical training institutes. He is almost done with his studies and will soon be able to work toward a better job. Abraham arrived at the hospital on Saturday afternoon with right lower limb pain. On physical examination, his lower limb had bruises and it was swollen to the knee. After the examination, the clinician recommended an x-ray and the results revealed that Abraham had sustained a fracture of the upper end of tibia and fibula. The Orthopedic surgeon met him and recommends that he undergo surgery. Abraham has no medical insurance coverage, and he is now appealing to all well-wishers to help him in order to get his surgery. Abraham shared that he was hit by a tree while cutting it down. He cannot walk easily and more and has a lot of pain and swelling. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On September 27th, Abraham will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. After surgery Abraham will be able to continue with his studies, and he will no longer have pain. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1145 to fund this procedure. Abraham says, “I cannot walk without support. I am really worried because of my family. Kindly help me so that I may be able to get back to them and offer them my support.”

45%funded
$523raised
$622to go

Nyo is a 58-year-old woman. She and her husband are agricultural day laborers, but Nyo had to stop working two years ago due to poor vision. Since COVID-19 led to lockdowns in April 2020, her husband only receives work from his employer when there is a worker shortage so their income has been very limited. Nyo shared that she likes to meditate with prayer beads and listen to the news about her homeland Myanmar and music on the radio. Nyo is experiencing a cataract in her right eye. She can only see shadows, and the vision in her right eye is worsening. As a result, she cannot do household chores, and her husband has to help her to eat and guide her to the bathroom. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), is helping Nyo receive treatment. On January 4th, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Nyo’s natural lens and replace it with an intraocular lens implant. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. BCMF is requesting $1,500 to fund Nyo’s procedure. Nyo shared, “If I can’t work or I can’t see, I will have to beg to eat because my husband cannot work. My husband and I were so happy to learn that an organization will help pay for the cost of my treatment. We are thankful to the donors and BCMF.” Nyo added, “When I have money, I want to open a small dry foods shop in my house. This way, when my husband and I are no longer able to continue to work as day laborers because of our age, we can chose a way to earn extra money while staying at home.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Julie is a 26-year-old who hails from Kawaida village in rural Kenya.. She was married at an early age and has two children aged 12 and 4 years old. Julie sells old clothes near their house while her husband is a motorbike (bodaboda) driver. Julie was brought to the hospital by her mother-in-law, who cooks porridge for a local nursery school, earning limited income herself. Julie's family also relies on her (the mother-in-law) throughout the year for support. Julie was well until September 9th when she slipped and fell. She landed on her right leg leading to fracture-dislocation of the right ankle joint. She was taken to the County Hospital for treatment, but Julie still has difficulty walking and is in pain. After six weeks when her cast was removed, it was noted that the bones had not united and an ORIF surgery was recommended, but they could not afford it. Since then, Julie has just stayed at home until our partner's Community Health Worker identified her and asked them to come and seek support at Nazareth Hospital. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On November 25th, Julie will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This procedure will relieve her of the pain, help her walk easily again, and restore her leg's functionality. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $1,049 to fund this procedure. Julie's mother-in-law says, “It is becoming very difficult for us because I have to do most of the work for my daughter-in-law. I was very happy when the Community Health Worker asked me to bring her here for possible support. I hope she will get sponsorship so that she can be well and be able to continue with her job, at least to contribute to taking care of her family."

$1,049raised
Fully funded