I

ian shadwell

ian's Story

ian joined Watsi on October 30th, 2014. 6 other people also joined Watsi on that day! ian's most recent donation supported Edson, a baby boy from Guatemala, to fund malnutrition treatment.

Impact

ian has funded healthcare for 33 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by ian

B. Kuma

B. Kuma, a beautiful and adorable six-month-old girl, lives about 500 kilometers from Addis Ababa in Ethiopia. Her parents are poor farmers and their income is not enough to feed the family well. Thus far, B. Kuma has been fed exclusively on breast milk. B. Kuma was born with an anorectal malformation called imperforate anus, which means she has no opening where the anus usually should be. As a result, she cannot pass stool in a normal way. Due to her condition, B. Kuma developed a bowel obstruction and had to have an emergency colostomy. A colostomy is a surgical procedure in which a piece of the colon is redirected to an alternative opening in the abdominal wall so that waste material can exit the body. However, B. Kuma has had numerous issues with the colostomy, including complications such as leakage and irritation. Her family has suffered throughout this process. They went to a number of hospitals in search of treatment, and they are very worried about their daughter's condition. Children born with birth defects-- and indeed, their parents too-- often fall victim to social stigmas and discrimination. For these reasons, B. Kuma and her parents risk social and psychological problems if she cannot be treated. "I can't pay for my child's medical bill and that worries me for the past six months," says B. Kuma's father. "I did not know what to do. But we heard from another hospital that our child can get the treatment for free at Bethany Kids (a facility run by Watsi's medical partner), and we came here hoping for help." Fortunately, we can help fund B. Kuma's $1,500 procedure, during which doctors will surgically repair her malformation. After her surgery, B. Kuma should be able to pass stool normally, eliminating the risk of future health complications and social barriers.

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Purity

Purity is a playful and jovial 21-month-old girl who lives with her parents and sibling in a one-room house in Kenya. Purity was born healthy, and this was a great joy to her parents. At three months of age, Purity began to exhibit some irritability, but her parents had no idea what could be wrong. A visit to the nearest local clinic found her to be fine. However, over time, her parents noticed that her head was growing really fast compared to her body. They took Purity to another hospital and learned that she has hydrocephalus. Hydrocephalus is a condition in which there is an accumulation of fluid in the brain as a result of infection, trauma, malformation of the central nervous system, or genetic defect. Too much fluid can increase pressure on the brain and inside the skull, leading to an enlarged head and developmental issues. To support the family, Purity's father works casually at a car wash while her mother stays at home. The family has saved some money to pay for Purity's care, but they require more funds. On the advice of a friend, Purity's parents took her to BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital for evaluation and treatment. For $615, Purity will undergo surgery to place a shunt to drain the excess fluid from her brain and transport it to her abdomen, where it can be resorbed by the body. Funding also covers the costs of five days of hospital care, imaging, blood work, and medicine. Purity's family is contributing $52 from their savings to cover additional costs associated with her care. “I believe it is not too late and, with surgery, we can keep Purity's head from getting any bigger," shares her mother. "I appreciate any sort of help toward my daughter’s treatment."

100% funded

$615raised
Fully funded
Elvis

Elvis, an 18-year-old boy from Guatemala, started to get seizures when he was eight years old. Now he gets about one seizure every week, and they are often severe--he has had to be hospitalized following many of his seizures. He has not been able to study because of his mother's fear of him having a seizure during class, and also because his mother cannot afford to pay for both his treatment and his education, forcing her to choose to pay for his medications. Elvis is the youngest of three children. He was raised by a single mother who is incredibly hard working and strong, and who wakes up at dawn every morning to wash the neighbors' clothes, helping her to earn a few dollars per day. Elvis and his mother have tried to seek out treatment in Guatemala City, but since they live in a rural, mountainous community that is far away from the city, they have not been able to afford to continue traveling several hours for each appointment, and have run out of money to pay for medications. Elvis loves to sing along to Christian ballads on the radio, and his faith has helped him stay strong through his health problems. For $967, treatment will be possible for Elvis. This treatment will give him access to the medications he needs to get his seizures under control. He will undergo comprehensive diagnostic work to determine the cause of his seizures and see if he has any other related conditions. His mother will not have to live in fear of her son having a seizure, and she will no longer have to choose between sending him to school and paying for treatment. This will give Elvis the chance to be a normal teenager, go back to school, and his mother will be able to feel secure that his condition is more stable. "I want my son to stop suffering. Every time he has a seizure he suffers, and I suffer with him. I want him to study and become a great professional," shares Elvis's mother.

100% funded

$967raised
Fully funded
Dah Htoo

Dah Htoo is a 2-year-old boy who lives in Burma near the Thai border. He lives with his parents, uncle, grandmother, and newborn younger brother. Dah Htoo is a sociable little boy who loves watching cartoons and playing with his father. His father is a subsistence farmer who earns approximately 429 USD from his yearly crop. As this is not enough to cover the family’s expenses, his father sometimes works as a agricultural day laborer to earn extra money. Doing this he earns about 5 USD per day. When Dah Htoo was one-year-old, he was crawling in the kitchen, close to where his mother was cooking hot soup. Dah Htoo accidentally slipped and knocked over the boiling soup, spilling it over his arm. His parents took him straight to the village clinic where the medics bandaged his arm and hand. Initially, his arm was straight and he was able to hold out his hand. Gradually, the contracture has become worse over time and now he cannot straighten out his hand. Dah Htoo’s hand is no longer painful, but it is very inconvenient for him as he cannot use his right hand at all. This problem will get worse over time if he is unable to receive treatment. His arm is itchy and his parents are very anxious that he will be able to receive treatment. The quality of Dan Htoo's life will significantly improve with surgery. Surgery to treat Dah Htoo's burns costs $1,500. "When he is old enough, I would like my son to be able to go to school and get an education, so he will be able to lead a better life than we do now," Dah Htoo's father shares.

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded