C

Chelsea Weber

MONTHLY DONOR

United States

Chelsea's Story

Chelsea joined Watsi on December 2nd, 2014. Four years ago, Chelsea became the 700th member to automatically support a new Watsi patient every month. Since then, 4,291 more people have become monthly donors! Chelsea's most recent donation traveled 1,500 miles to support Angélica, a baby girl from Guatemala, for malnutrition treatment and formula.

Impact

Chelsea has funded healthcare for 17 patients in 6 countries.

All patients funded by Chelsea

Angélica

Angelica is a newborn baby girl from rural Guatemala. She was born one month prematurely. She was small and weak when she was born, and acquired an infection in her eyes and now her lungs. When she came to see us at the clinic, she was very sick, but now she is doing much better after receiving hospital care. Unfortunately, her mother had to receive antibiotics that are unsafe for breastfeeding. Since her mother had to stop breastfeeding while taking the medications, she lost her ability to make milk and now Angelica is acutely malnourished. Her mother says her heart breaks because she is unable to give her daughter enough milk to make her stop crying. Angelica lives with her parents and her older siblings in a humble one-room wood house with a tin roof. Her mother is worried because she can see her daughter losing weight, and she does not have enough milk to feed her. Since she spends so much time caring for Angelica and her father works as a day laborer in the coffee fields, barely making enough money to support basic living costs, they cannot afford the extremely expensive formula Angelica needs to survive. Although Angelica's life is in danger now, the treatment she needs to be a healthy and happy baby is simple. She will receive formula with the protein, calories, and nutrients she needs to grow and develop. Her immune system will grow stronger with the formula, and she will no longer cry from hunger. This treatment will not only save Angelica's life, but will mean she is no longer at risk for seizures, diarrhea, and long-term developmental delays due to her lack of milk. "My desire is that my daughter gets better and can grow healthily," her mother said. "I want to see her get big so that she can go to the school and study and be a person like you all that helps the people that need it."

100% funded

$1,016raised
Fully funded
Taw

40-year-old Taw is a farmer who lives with her husband, son, and four daughters in Burma. Her family practices swidden agriculture—a rotational farming method in which different plots of land are cleared for cultivation each year—to grow rice, green beans, and cucumbers to feed themselves. Taw spent several months away from her husband and children while receiving treatment for choriocarcinoma, a cancer of the uterus that occurs during pregnancy. The fast-growing cancer cells develop within the tissue that becomes the placenta. Costs associated with Taw’s previous medical care have left the family with a large amount of debt. With no income from the farm and no external sources of financial support, they have no means of paying for additional treatment for Taw or even education fees or clothes for the children. In addition, the shifting of roles within the family has decreased productivity on the farm and puts them at risk of not producing enough food to feed themselves. “Taw’s current symptoms include gripping abdominal pain and tight muscle spasms in her lower back that force her to lie down,” our medical partner, Burma Border Projects (BBP), tells us. “She experiences ongoing bleeding, has spells of dizziness and headaches, and is easily fatigued.” “Taw has been unable to work, and her husband has taken time off to care for her and their sick daughter,” BBP continues. “This has forced their 14-year-old daughter to drop out of school and to take up considerable responsibility to support the family.” For $1500, Taw will undergo a hysterectomy to remove her uterus. Funding also covers the costs of pre- and post-surgical consultations, seven days of hospital care, and transportation to and from the hospital. “It is hoped that surgery will improve the health condition and comfort of Taw so that she can return to her family,” says BBP. “When I recover, I will work hard to provide for my children," Taw shares.

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Lucy

“I hope to become a primary school teacher when I grow up,” says Lucy, a 17-year-old student from Tanzania who is the sixth of seven children in her family. At school, Lucy works hard in her classes and enjoys playing netball, and at home, she helps her mother with the evening chores. “Lucy has a mass on her left radial bone which became visible when she was nine years old,” our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), tells us. “Very slowly, the mass has been increasing in size, and it is now painful when she goes about her activities such as lifting a bucket of water or washing clothes.” Treatment for Lucy entails surgery to remove the mass to prevent further growth and relieve the pain that she experiences with activity. “If not treated,” AMHF explains, “the mass may become cancerous as it continues to grow.” Lucy’s father owns a small shop where he sells spare parts for bicycles and motorcycles, and her mother makes soap to sell. They also maintain a small farm to raise food to feed their family. Despite their hard work, they are unable to afford the surgery that Lucy needs. For $920, Lucy will undergo surgery to remove the mass on her arm. Funding also covers the costs of pre and post-operative consultations, six days of hospital care, lab work, imaging, medicine, and six weeks of accommodations at the Plaster House for recovery and rehabilitation. After surgery, “The pain and swelling on the radial bone will be gone, allowing Lucy to perform various activities comfortably,” says AMHF.

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$920raised
Fully funded
Dah

38-year-old Dah lives in Burma with her husband, her 18-year-old niece, and her three children. Our medical partner, Burma Border Projects (BBP), says that both Dah’s niece and 13-year-old daughter are in school. To support the family, Dah’s son earns a modest income working as a hunter. This past August, Dah felt a palpable mass in her abdomen caused by ovarian cysts. When her symptoms persisted, Dah initially sought medical care locally, but her condition was misdiagnosed and left untreated. Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled masses that develop within the uterus. BBP explains that without treatment, “Dah's abdomen is growing bigger everyday and she suffers from back pain. She did not want to seek treatment for her condition in Burma, because she knows that she would not be able to afford the medical costs.” For $1,500, Dah will receive a total abdominal hysterectomy--removing her uterus, cervix, and painful masses during a single operation. This treatment will alleviate Dah’s immediate symptoms and prevent her condition from recurring in the future. “Following surgery for ovarian cysts, Dah will no longer have bloating of her stomach and back pain,” BBP states. “After recovering, she will be able to commence looking for work in a local clinic.” Burma Children's Medical Fund, an organization that facilitates the transportation and treatment of Burmese people at Thai hospitals, is subsidizing this surgery by $1,421. "I want to get surgery for my condition so I don’t have to worry about that anymore," Dah shares. "When I have recovered from that, I would like to start working in a clinic and helping people. My first priority now is to get healthy and feel better. Then, I can continue with my dreams.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Ronald

Ronald is a 13-year-old boy who lives in Kenya with his mother, father, and two younger siblings. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF) describes Ronald as, “shy, calm, and quiet.” Ronald was born with hypospadias, a congenital condition in which the urethra does not grow to its full length. As a result, the urethral opening is located on the underside of the penis, which in turn causes an irregular stream. If left untreated, hypospadias can lead to frequent urinary tract infections, infertility, and social stigma. When Ronald’s parents first noticed his hypospadias when he was a baby, they took him to the nearest hospital. At the time, however, it seemed like a minor problem that may later improve. AMHF tells us, “It wasn’t until Ronald had reached the age at which many young boys in his culture transition into manhood—through a rite of passage commonly known as circumcision—that they noticed nothing had changed.” At this point, Ronald’s parents decided to, “aggressively seek treatment.” However, Ronald’s father works at a mini-market and his mother tends to their home, so they are in need of financial support. For $655 Ronald will receive hypospadias repair and 10 days of recovery in the hospital. This surgery will provide a long-term solution to Ronald’s condition by extending the length of the urethra. Ronald shares, “I can’t pass urine near my friends because I am quite sure they will laugh at me. I hope to get treated soon because I don’t want to carry that feeling with me into high school.” Ronald, who will be starting high school soon, plans to work hard, get good grades, and pursue his dream of becoming an engineer.

100% funded

$655raised
Fully funded
Mu Eh

“The symptoms make it difficult to focus on my studies and that upsets me. My mind wants to study, but my body will not allow it,” says Mu Eh. Meet Mu Eh, a 19-year-old woman who lives in a refugee camp in Thailand with her parents and three younger siblings. “Mu Eh was 15 years old when she first noticed the symptoms of her condition,” shares our medical partner, Burma Border Projects (BBP). “She has made multiple visits to health clinics and hospitals over the past four years and been prescribed several different types of medication, however her symptoms have become more severe over time.” Mu Eh has nasal poylps. Nasal polyps are soft, sac-like growths on the lining of the nose or sinuses. BBP tells us they cause her pain and “make it difficult for her to breathe through her nose.” The growths also lead to “frequent headaches and her nose will sometimes swell and turn red.” Mu Eh passed grade 10 and is about to begin her post-term education. “She enjoys school and is interested in studying medicine,” BBP continues. “She occasionally misses school because of her condition and the pain makes it difficult to concentrate when she is studying.” $1500 will fund the procedure to remove the polyps along with transportation to and from the hospital. "With treatment, Mu Eh can be expected to make a full recovery and live symptom-free. She will able to return to her studies and work toward her dream of becoming a doctor.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded