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Kantideep Thota

MONTHLY DONOR

United Kingdom   •   Born on February 10

Kantideep's Story

Kantideep joined Watsi on February 22nd, 2014. Four years ago, Kantideep became the 1909th member to automatically support a new Watsi patient every month. Since then, 4,563 more people have become monthly donors! Kantideep's most recent donation traveled 4,800 miles to support Johnson, a baby boy from Tanzania, to fund spina bifida treatment.

Impact

Kantideep has funded healthcare for 43 patients in 11 countries.

All patients funded by Kantideep

Johnson

Johnson is an 8-month baby boy from Tanzania. Johnson, the last born child in a family of four, and already is a very active and friendly little boy. Johnson's parents are both subsistence farmers. Johnson was born in a local hospital where his parents were informed that his spine was not fully formed, thus resulting in a condition known as spinal bifida. Because Johnson's condition was not severe, they were informed that he wouldn’t need treatment and that it would close on its own. As their family continued to attend clinics they were told to wait till Johnson gets to five months old for him to have any kind of treatment. At five months they took him to hospital for the treatment but the cost was too high for them to afford and they had to return home. As time went by, Johnson's mother saw that his condition could end up complicated if he didn’t get treatment soon and end up greatly affecting Johnson later in life. She decided to seek treatment. She went to Mt Meru and was referred to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center ALMC for more help.  Johnson was born with spina bifida, a type of neural tube defect in which the spine does not properly close around the spinal cord. Without treatment, Johnson is at risk of lower-limb paralysis, infection of the exposed nervous tissue, development of tethered cord syndrome, and possible developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,015 to cover the cost of Johnson's spina bifida closure surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on September 7th. This procedure will hopefully spare Johnson from the risks associated with his condition, instead allowing him to grow and develop along a healthy trajectory. Johnson’s mother says, “We are concerned if our son does not get his spine corrected, it might affect his ability to walk. Please help my son.”

69% funded

69%funded
$708raised
$307to go
Lazaru

Lazaru was diagnosed with an anorectal malformation a day after birth. This is a condition where Lazaru was born without an anal opening. While changing his diapers, his mother noticed that Lazaru had not passed stool since he was born. His abdomen was distended and he was quite irritable. A closer look confirmed that their son lacked an anal opening. This was unheard of and discreetly, his parents rushed him to the nearest hospital. Lazaru was further referred and a colostomy put in place when he was three days old. A second surgery would be needed later on to create an anal opening. The funds they had were exhausted and thus could not afford to pay for the subsequent surgery. A previous Watsi beneficiary from their village advised them to visit BethanyKids Hospital where they could get assistance. With hopes high, they set out. The creation of an anal opening is needed without which, Lazaru risks scarring at the colostomy site due to occasional leakages and infection. Lazaru lives with his parents and elder brother in a one-room traditional house in the Rift Valley region of Kenya. His parents are subsistence farmers and own a few goats. His family was also advised to apply for national health insurance to support future needs, which they did not know was possible. They are appealing for help towards their son’s surgical care. “A friend told us that we would get help from here and we are happy even for the warm reception,” says Lazaru’s mother.

100% funded

$708raised
Fully funded
Myat

Myat is a two-month-old boy who lives with his family in Hpa-An Town, Karen State, Burma. His father passed away when his mother was two months pregnant with him. Myat’s mother is a homemaker and she takes care of him at home. All of his sister and brothers are students. Myat’s grandfather drives a tricycle taxi. On 6 June 2019, Myat was born without any complications at HGH. Since he was born, his mother noticed that he has been passing white coloured stools, but she did not do anything about it because she thought it was normal. When he was just over a month old, his mother noticed that Myat’s navel was bigger than normal. His mother then took him to HGH. The doctor examined his navel and told his mother not to worry too much and he also told her come back if it becomes bigger. A few days later, Myat’s mother noticed that his navel has become bigger and his mother took him to the hospital again. The doctor again took a look at Myat’s navel and advised his mother to take him to a hospital in Yangon for treatment. However, Myat’s mother did not have money to go to Yangon. On 6 September 2019 Myat received an X-ray at Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) and was given a diagnosis of a bulging navel and biliary atresia, a childhood disease of the liver in which one or more bile ducts are abnormally narrow, blocked, or absent. Currently, Myat still passes white coloured stools. He also has a bulging navel which never goes away. His mother is very much worried for him, especially that she just learned about his liver disease. Myat’s mother said, “I would like him to be like other children. I feel bad for him but at the same time happy that an organization Burma Children Medical Fund will help him for his treatment.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Aloyce

Aloyce is a student from Tanzania. He is nineteen years old young man and the last born child in a family of three children. Aloyce only had the chance to study up to class seven. Due to financial challenges, he couldn’t continue with his studies and fulfill his dream of becoming an engineer. He stayed home helping his parents in their small scale farming to make himself productive and support his parents. Eventually a relative came in and offered to take him to Dar es Salaam and teach him welding work so that he could be able to make a living for himself. Aloyce has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. As a result of his condition, Aloyce has been experiencing seizures and fainting. Without treatment, Aloyce will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,238 to cover the cost of surgery for Aloyce that will treat his hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on October 15th and will drain the excess fluid from Aloyce's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve his quality of life. With proper treatment, Aloyce will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young boy. Aloyce says, “People look at me differently now due to this condition please help me get this treatment so that I can be able to resume my training and normal life activities again.”

100% funded

$1,238raised
Fully funded