Terri BakerMONTHLY DONOR
Terri's Story

Terri joined Watsi on December 17th, 2015. Five years ago, Terri joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Terri's most recent donation traveled 8,200 miles to support Selinah, a nun from Uganda, to fund a hysterectomy.

Impact

Terri has funded healthcare for 75 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Terri

Selinah is a 31-year-old nun from Uganda. She serves as a nun under Our Lady of Fatima Rushoroza and is currently posted to the formation house of the Missionaries of Africa. She does not receive salary for her services apart from a small allowance for personal use. She is the fifth born in a family of 10 and her parents are small-scale farmers. For three years, Selinah has been experiencing lower abdominal pains. She was treated for a bacterial infection with no change in symptoms. She has also had several medications from different medical centers. None of them helped, and in the last year her condition has worsened. She can no longer stand comfortably for long because she has pains extending to her lower body. Selinah has challenges getting out of bed due to this pain. Selinah has been diagnosed with leiomyoma and endometrial hyperplasia. If not treated, she is at a risk of endometrial carcinoma and other severe complications like anaemia. Selinah has sought financial support from her congregation, but shared that they are unable to meet the surgery cost because of the number of congregants affected by COVID-19. She needs to undergo a hysterectomy, a procedure in which surgeons will remove her uterus. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is requesting $319 to fund Selinah's surgery. On September 4th, she will undergo gynecological surgery at our medical partner's care center. Once recovered, Selinah will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain. Sister Selinah says, “My condition has generally affected my duties and life as a nun. Given treatment, I will be able to do all my day to day duties and be able to develop my congregation. I will continue serving the Lord by helping others where I can.”

40%funded
$130raised
$189to go

Beatrice is a quiet lady in her early 50’s who has been blessed with six children, now ages 14-27. She runs a small grocery at the marketplace to provide for her family. Beatrice's husband doesn’t have a stable job. He does casual jobs across the village such as clearing bushes to meet the needs of his family. Beatrice and her family live in a two-bedroom house constructed with mud. They depend mostly on their daily jobs for food and save a little to pay school fees for their children and bills at the end of the month. A week ago, Beatrice sustained a left arm injury after fainting. Beatrice was brought to Kapsowar Hospital and an X-Ray was done which confirmed a fracture to her left humerus. Beatrice shared that she has a history of fainting and subsequently falling. Beatrice is in pain and she is unable to attend to her normal day-to-day things now. Beatrice is concerned that she can’t cook for her family or run her grocery business due to her injury. Beatrice had a cast applied about a week ago and was discharged to go home to look for funds for her surgery. A week later, Beatrice returned to the hospital with no hope of raising funds for her surgery. Their family is unable to raise the required amount with their low wages only able to afford daily needs like meals and clothing. Fortunately, our medical partner can help. On September 7th, Beatrice will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation procedure. Beatrice will no longer be in pain, she will be able to attend to her grocery business and take care of her family. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $941 to fund this procedure. Beatrice says, “Life has never been the same since I broke my hand. I am worried about my children who need care every day. My hope is to get treated so that I can continue supporting my family.”

82%funded
$772raised
$169to go

Shoh is a 47-year-old man who lives with his wife, two sons, daughter-in-law and two daughters in Nu Poe Refugee Camp in Thailand. In the camp, Shoh and his oldest son are teachers who teach about the Quran for other refugees. They each earn 1,200 baht (approx. 40 USD) per month. His wife is often sick, and his eldest daughter has to look after her at home. His daughter-in-law is a homemaker while his youngest daughter and son are students. Shoh’s household receives 1,110 baht (approx. 37 USD) every month on a cash card to purchase rations in the camp. Their monthly household income is just enough to cover their daily expenses as they also receive free basic health care and education in the camp. Since February 2020, Shoh has had umbilical hearnia. Currently, Shoh’s abdomen pain is not severe but his hernia is still increasing in size. He feels uncomfortable when he walks because of his swollen abdomen. He cannot sleep well and is increasingly worried about his diagnosis. The pain in his abdomen increases when he feels cold, especially at night. Fortunately, on March 9th, he will undergo hernia repair surgery at Mae Sot General Hospital, our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund Shoh's hernia repair surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on March 9th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. Shoh said, “I do not want to stop being a teacher. I love teaching the Quran to young children. Also, if I do not teach, I do not earn an income and my family does not have enough income to cover our household expenses.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Su is a 16-year-old girl from Burma. She has three siblings. Su’s mother is a home maker, and her older brother works as a day labourer. Su and her youngest sister are students and this year Su is in grade seven. Her family's combined monthly income is around 200,000 kyat (approx. 200 USD) per month, which is just enough for their daily expenses, but not enough to pay for basic healthcare. When she has free time, Su loves to play football with her friends at school and she likes to be the goalkeeper. She also loves to read books and watch movies. Su plans to continue her studies as soon as she finishes her treatment. Su was diagnosed with a heart condition that involves a malformation of the mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. Currently, Su still feels tired, but not as much as before she started taking her medication. When she feels more tired, her breath quickens. Su has stopped attending school since she got sick. Although she wants to go back to school, her mother worries for her as her school is a little far and she normally walks there. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Su. The treatment is scheduled to take place on February 12nd and, once completed, will hopefully allow her to live more comfortably. Su's mother shared, “Su really wants to go to school but I worry that the long walking distance from our house to her school will make her tired and worsen her condition. So, I asked her to stay home for a while until she can get treated.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Marline is a 7-year-old boy from Kenya. He is a cheerful boy and a Grade 2 student at Jayden Academy. Marline wants to be an engineer when he grows up. Marline's mother says that he loves to dismantle and assemble electronics in the house, and is well on his way to his career dreams. Additionally, Marline has a condition called spina bifida. Earlier in April 2020, Marline was playing with his friends when his mother noticed a small pimple-like wound on his right foot. It was small at first, but slowly started to grow bigger in size. His mother rushed him to a nearby health centre in their hometown, where he has been undergoing dressing in the facility but they have not seen much improvement. Since Marline has been coming to Kijabe Hospital for his spina bifida clinic, he opted to seek review in the hospital and get this wound checked. He was reviewed a week ago by the plastic and pediatric surgical teams, who recommended that he undergoes debridement, excision of calcaneal ulcer, and flap cover surgery to clean and heal his infected wound. Currently, Marline is in pain and at risk for further infection. If left unattended, the wound may result in severe infection and possible amputation. Unfortunately, these procedures are costly for Marline's family. His mother is a single mother raising two kids on her own. Their family lives in a bedsitter house in Ruai, at the outskirts of Nairobi. Marline's father left the family and his responsibility. Marline's mother is the sole breadwinner of the family and she has a small grocery kiosk. The total profit from the venture is very small, and her close relatives are not able to assist with financial support. Their family appeals for help. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Marline receive treatment. On January 6th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to help heal the wound and prevent possible complications. Now, Marline's family needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. Marline's mother says, “This wound is worsening by the day. If left unattended, doctors say that he might lose his leg. This would be hurting all of us. Kindly help us as we really don’t have a way out."

$1,185raised
Fully funded

Alexander is a brave-looking 13-year-old boy from Kiambu County in central Kenya. He is the firstborn in a family of two and in class seven. His mother is single and a casual laborer working in neighbours’ farms. Alexander is very social and likes to play a lot, but in the last three weeks, the mother noticed he was avoiding to play and was not walking in a normal way. When she asked him he could not understand so she brought him to hospital. An ultrasound was done and it showed undescended right testis and inguinal hernia with mild hydrocele. When the surgeon advised for an orchidopexy surgery, Alexander's mother was in tears because she knew that it is very hard to get money for this important surgery. She used to have some national health insurance coverage but has been unable to pay the monthly fee for it. Her hopes were elevated after the surgeon asked her to visit our local Watsi rep's office for possible support. Alexander was diagnosed with cryptorchidism, a condition in which one or both of the testicles remains undescended. If left untreated, Alexander has an increased risk of developing hernias, testicular cancer, and fertility problems in the future. Alexander will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on October 12th. AMHF is requesting $483 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. “I am worried about my son, he is not able to play with friends and this is making him worried. I kindly request Watsi for support so that he can be treated and get well to continue with his life, and be ready for schools when they re-open,” shared Alexanders’ mother.

$483raised
Fully funded