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Timothy Lundergan

MONTHLY DONOR

Timothy's Story

Timothy joined Watsi on November 10th, 2014. Six months ago, Timothy joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Timothy's most recent donation supported Naw Mu, a five-year-old student from Thailand, to fund fracture repair surgery for her arm.

Impact

Timothy has funded healthcare for 75 patients in 11 countries.

All patients funded by Timothy

Naw Mu

Naw Mu is a five-year-old girl who lives with her family in a refugee camp in Northern Thailand. Naw Mu, her older brother and older sister are all primary school students. Her mother is a homemaker and her father works as a day laborer outside of the camp when he can. Her parents also look after a small shop in the camp. Her family's combined income is just enough to cover their family expenses and are grateful they can receive basic healthcare and education in the camp. On April 8th, Naw Mu was playing with her friends when she fell to the ground and injured her left arm. Her mother immediately took her to the hospital in the camp, run by Malteser International Thailand. When the medics examined her arm, they suspected that Naw Mu's forearm was fractured and referred her to another hospital to confirm her diagnosis. After Naw Mu received an x-ray, the doctor confirmed that Naw Mu's radius and ulna bones are broken. Currently, Naw Mu is experiencing pain in her left arm and has to take pain medication to have comfort and to sleep. She cannot lift her left hand or move it around. Fortunately, with the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Naw Mu will undergo surgery to reset her fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for April 9th and will cost $1,500. With this treatment, she will no longer be in pain and she will be able to move her hand and arm fully again in the future. Naw Mu's father shared, “my daughter loves to play outsides with her friends and watching cartoon clips on the phone. After she receives surgery, I hope that she is able to play with her friends again.”

82% funded

82%funded
$1,235raised
$265to go
Ku

Ku is an 11-year-old student from Thailand. Ku lives with his mother, four brothers and a sister in a refugee camp. All of his siblings also go to school, except for his oldest brother, who used to work with their mother as agricultural day labourers. However, since the outbreak of Covid-19 in 2020, they have not been able to leave the camp easily to find work. Ku's father works as a day labourer outside of the camp, but has also been unable to find consistent work due to the pandemic. Ku's family receives some financial support from an external organisation, but it is not enough to cover their expenses, and they shared that they often borrow rice or money from their neighbors. In March 2021, Ku and his friends were playing tag that led him to have a bad fall. Ku had taken off his sandals and left them at the top of a hill. When he ran up the rocky hill to fetch his sandals, he slipped and stuck out his left hand to break his fall, breaking his wrist. Currently, Ku’s left hand and forearm are very painful. He cannot bend his wrist and can only move his fingers slightly. Before his accident, Ku was able to prepare his own meals and set up his mosquito net at night. But now, he needs someone to help him do these tasks. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Ku will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for March 10th and will cost $1,500. This procedure will help Ku use his left hand again and live pain-free. He will be able to cook his own meals again and set up his mosquito net by himself. Now, he and his family need help raising money for this procedure. Ku's mother shared, "After he receives treatment, I want Ku to continue his studies until he graduates and becomes a medic."

79% funded

79%funded
$1,194raised
$306to go
Su

Su is a 16-year-old girl from Burma. She has three siblings. Su’s mother is a home maker, and her older brother works as a day labourer. Su and her youngest sister are students and this year Su is in grade seven. Her family's combined monthly income is around 200,000 kyat (approx. 200 USD) per month, which is just enough for their daily expenses, but not enough to pay for basic healthcare. When she has free time, Su loves to play football with her friends at school and she likes to be the goalkeeper. She also loves to read books and watch movies. Su plans to continue her studies as soon as she finishes her treatment. Su was diagnosed with a heart condition that involves a malformation of the mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. Currently, Su still feels tired, but not as much as before she started taking her medication. When she feels more tired, her breath quickens. Su has stopped attending school since she got sick. Although she wants to go back to school, her mother worries for her as her school is a little far and she normally walks there. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Su. The treatment is scheduled to take place on February 12nd and, once completed, will hopefully allow her to live more comfortably. Su's mother shared, “Su really wants to go to school but I worry that the long walking distance from our house to her school will make her tired and worsen her condition. So, I asked her to stay home for a while until she can get treated.”

81% funded

81%funded
$1,223raised
$277to go
Purity

Purity is a 57-year-old woman from Kenya. As she enters our local Watsi rep's office, Purity strains to sit and cannot hide her pains. She looks uneasy and can’t stop asking when she will be going to the operating theatre. She developed a deep spine infection (surgical site infection) after lumbar surgery that necessitates urgent debridement and removal of hardware. Her current condition is serious and the orthopaedic team has requested an urgent procedure or she risks paralysis. Purity is a mother of 3, all of whom are now adults. Her youngest son is a student at a local university and still depends on her. Her older son is a casual laborer working with Purity’s husband at construction sites locally referred to as mjengo. Her other son is a police officer and has been the one helping Purity to cover her previous medical bills. Her son took out a loan but it was barely enough to cover her earlier treatment. She is also hoping for support from the National Health Insurance coverage, but her application is pending. She is requesting emergency assistance. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Purity receive treatment. On November 4th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to finally help heal her wound, reduce her pain, and enable her to ambulate with ease. Now, Purity needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. Purity shared, “I couldn’t sleep one more night at home, the pains are unbearable. I have no source of finances to cover for the surgery that will help me get better. I risk paralysis if this procedure is not performed.”

100% funded

$1,185raised
Fully funded
Nay Kaw

Nay Kaw is an 11-year-old boy from Burma. He lives with his parents, two older brothers and two younger sisters in a village in Karen State. Nay Kaw and his sister are both students. He is a grade one student since leaving the monkhood last year. His father is a farmer. Nay Kaw was born with a small mass on his right wrist. Once Nay Kaw's mother was able to save up and send him to Mae Tao Clinic for treatment in Thailand, Nay Kaw had the mass surgically removed in July at Mae Sot Hospital. After surgery, the biopsy revealed that the mass was caused by a hemangioma. As a result of this, the doctor referred him for further treatment in nearby Chiang Mai. Since his surgery, the pain in his wrist has decreased. However, if something touches his right wrist or if he has to carry something heavy in his right hand, he is in a lot of pain. Doctors want Nay Kaw to undergo an MRI, an imaging procedure that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce images of bodily organs. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $814 to cover the cost of Nay Kaw's MRI and care, scheduled for October 8th. "I want my right hand to be normal and I do not want to have an unusually large wrist," he said. "If the pain in my hand decreases, I will help my mother with the housework. If my hand will be without pain and I will be able to play with my friends at school, I will be happy with my friends again. In the future I will go school and become a good person."

100% funded

$814raised
Fully funded