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Hai's Story

Hai joined Watsi on April 10th, 2017. Two years ago, Hai joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Hai's most recent donation supported Myo, a future teacher from Burma, to fund cardiac surgery.

Impact

Hai has funded healthcare for 38 patients in 9 countries.

All patients funded by Hai

Myo

Myo is a 16-year-old boy from Burma. He lives with his parents and four brothers in northern Rakhine State. Myo is a student in grade nine and his four brothers also go to school. However, they have been unable to study since the Covid-19 pandemic shut all schools. Myo’s parents are day laborers, and their family's combined income is just enough to cover their daily expenses since Myo and his brothers’ schooling is free. To survive with limited income, they forage for vegetables and fish. If they fall ill, they use traditional medicine, which is more affordable then going to a clinic or a hospital. Myo was diagnosed with a heart condition that involves a malformation of the mitral valve, which is the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. Currently, Myo cannot walk long distances or climb stairs because of his tiredness. Sometimes, he cannot breathe very well. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Myo. The treatment is scheduled to take place on February 7th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. Myo shared, “I am worried about my health and I feel sorry for my parents. Because of my health problems, my father had to work more days to earn more money. Also, my mother cannot work because she accompanies me and has to take care of me. I hope my school will reopen soon so that I can go back to school. One day I hope that I can become a teacher. I want to teach because there are not enough teachers in my village.”

71% funded

71%funded
$1,066raised
$434to go
Alexander

Alexander is a brave-looking 13-year-old boy from Kiambu County in central Kenya. He is the firstborn in a family of two and in class seven. His mother is single and a casual laborer working in neighbours’ farms. Alexander is very social and likes to play a lot, but in the last three weeks, the mother noticed he was avoiding to play and was not walking in a normal way. When she asked him he could not understand so she brought him to hospital. An ultrasound was done and it showed undescended right testis and inguinal hernia with mild hydrocele. When the surgeon advised for an orchidopexy surgery, Alexander's mother was in tears because she knew that it is very hard to get money for this important surgery. She used to have some national health insurance coverage but has been unable to pay the monthly fee for it. Her hopes were elevated after the surgeon asked her to visit our local Watsi rep's office for possible support. Alexander was diagnosed with cryptorchidism, a condition in which one or both of the testicles remains undescended. If left untreated, Alexander has an increased risk of developing hernias, testicular cancer, and fertility problems in the future. Alexander will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on October 12th. AMHF is requesting $483 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. “I am worried about my son, he is not able to play with friends and this is making him worried. I kindly request Watsi for support so that he can be treated and get well to continue with his life, and be ready for schools when they re-open,” shared Alexanders’ mother.

100% funded

$483raised
Fully funded
Sinzo

Sinzo is a cheerful girl from Tanzania. She is seven years old and is the youngest in her family of seven children. Her parents separately when she was about three years old and she has been living with her mother ever since. Sinzo has a mass on the left side of her chest, which has caused her pain, and she shared makes her feel sad and crying when the pain starts. When she is not feeling the pain, she always wants to help her mother with home chores like washing dishes and cooking. Sinzo also wants to play with other kids, but from past experiences her mother says other kids pick on her and most of the time hurt her, so she prefers she stay home. She said she does this trying to protect her from the discrimination she is going through. Due to this her mother also decided not to take her to school since she doesn't want her daughter to be discriminated against. Sinzo's condition is congenital as her mother shared that she was born with a small swelling on the left side of her chest too. The doctors at the local hospital where she was delivered advised them not to worry and give her time to grow so that they can see if there is a need for surgery. When she was two years old, her mass had grown significantly and made Sinzo really uncomfortable and caused her a lot of pain. Her mother tried to ask Sinzo's father to find means to take her to hospital, but she shared that the father never showed any plans or took action. Sinzo's mother kept asking for the father’s support, but this lead to violence in their family and eventually Sinzo's mother decided to leave her husband’s home. She left with Sinzo and moved back to her parents’ home. Sinzo's mother depends on small-scale farming to be able to support herself and her daughter. Sinzo's mother says she has tried seeking help for her daughter from their local hospital but they were sent to the referral hospital and with very little income she has never been able to do so. Through our Medical Partner's outreach team, they learned of Sinzo's condition and helped connect her to treatment. She has now been scheduled for surgery and her mother is requesting funding support. Sinzo’s mother says, “It hurts me to see my daughter in this state, please help fund my daughter’s treatment cost as I am not able to find such an amount of money.”

100% funded

$724raised
Fully funded
Simon

Simon is a 3-month old baby boy from Tanzania and the only child to his parents. He was born healthy but when he was two months old he started having fevers and vomiting. His parents tried to seek treatment for him but the medication he was using only helped reduce the fevers. Soon his parents noticed his head was increasing in size and his general health became very poor due to the regular vomiting. His parents depend on small-scale farming for a living and their income is not always enough to get them by. Due to financial challenges, Simon's parents could not afford to take him to a referral hospital in time, hence his condition worsened. Through ALMC Hospital's outreach program, they learned about Simon's condition and the need for him to get treatment. Simon has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus which is putting him in danger of brain damage due to the pressure building up in his head, causing him not to be able to feed well and regular fevers. His parents cannot afford the treatment cost and are asking for help. Simon has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. As a result of his condition, Simon has been experiencing increasing head circumference, fevers and vomiting. Without treatment, Simon will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,300 to cover the cost of surgery for Simon that will treat his hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on September 7th and will drain the excess fluid from Simon's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve his quality of life. With proper treatment, Simon will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young boy. Simon’s mother says, “My son’s head keeps increasing in size and his general health deteriorates as days go by, we are unable to afford the treatment cost. Please help us.”

100% funded

$1,300raised
Fully funded
Nay

Nay is an eight-year-old boy from Thailand. He lives with his parents and two older sister in in a village in Tak Province. Nay’s mother and his eldest sister work at a sock factory. They receive food and accommodation in addition to a combined monthly income of around 7,000 baht (approx. $234 USD) per month. Nay and his other older sister are students at one of the migrant learning centers in their area, while his father is homemaker. This morning at around 11:00 am, Nay had finished writing his exam at school and was ready to go home. When he saw the school car that had come to bring the students back to their homes, he and some of the other students became excited about going back home. They rushed into the car before the car had come to a full stop. In the chaos, Nay fell out of the car and cried out that his leg is hurt. His teacher ran to help him up, but Nay told the teacher that he could not stand up and that his right leg was in pain. His teacher then arranged for a car to take him to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC), where upon arrival the medic examined his leg and informed his teacher that Nay had broken his right femur. The medic also told the teacher that he would need to receive surgery at Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) to help his leg heal properly. Currently, Nay is in pain and he cannot move or lift his right leg. He can only lay down and complains that his leg is in pain. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Nay will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for March 3rd and will cost $1,500. He will be able to move his leg and walk again after surgery. He will also no longer be in pain.

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Mya Mya

Mya Mya is a 40-year-old-woman who lives and work with her elder sister for a herbal medicine production workshop in Sanchaung Township, Yangon Division in Burma. They are originally from Bago Division and moved a few years ago. Since Mya Mya was 18 years old she has felt bronchial asthma and suffered from difficulty breathing. Sometimes she feels severely tired. She went to a health worker at her village and the health worker told her to go and see heart specialist in Yangon. However, at that time she did not have money to go to Yangon, so she did not go. She has only used herbal medicine for treating difficulty breathing since she was 18-year-old, which did help her feel better. For the last four months at night she has severe difficulty breathing, so she woke her sister up and asked her sister to send her to a private clinic called Yaung Chi Oo in Yangon. After the doctor's examination, she was told her that she needs to go and see heart specialist doctor. Then the doctor gave her an injection and some oral medication. Then, she went to Thiri Sandar Private Hospital on January 31, 2020 where she received an echocardiogram. The doctor told her that she has heart disease and she needs surgery. On February 5, Mya Mya went to Kan Thar Yar Hospital (KTYH) as suggested by the doctor at Thiri Sandar Hospital. The doctor at KTYH performed another echo before diagnosing her with large ventricular septal defect (VSD). The doctor at KTYH also told her that she needs surgery. Unfortunately, Mya Mya and her family cannot afford to pay for the surgery. After talking to the nurses and doctor about her problem, the nurses who know Watsi Partner Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) refered her to BCMF. Mya May needs to stop working because of her tiredness. She is worried about her parents because if she cannot work. She shared, "If I recover from my disease, I need to work for my parents, to support them.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded