Jim callasMONTHLY DONOR
Jim's Story

Jim joined Watsi on July 27th, 2015. Eleven months ago, Jim joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Jim's most recent donation traveled 8,500 miles to support Enock, a hardworking father from Kenya, to undergo bone transport surgery.

Team
Impact

Jim has funded healthcare for 10 patients in 3 countries.

All patients funded by Jim

Paw is a 24-year-old woman from Thailand. Originally from Burma, Paw, her husband, their three daughters and her parents fled in March 2021 after the Burmese military shot rockets into their village. In Thailand, as refugees, they cannot work, and have temporarily moved in with Paw's brother and his family. They receive rice from her brother's neighbors, while her brother's family provides them with vegetables and curries. In July 2021, Paw's parents and her two older daughters went back to their village when they felt it was safe to do so. Meanwhile, her husband and her three-month-old baby have stayed with her while she receives treatment in Chiang Mai. Two years ago, Paw noticed a mass on the right side of her neck. Her neighbor suggested she apply a natural remedy, but unfortunately, the mass remained and grew over time. In September 2019, she visited a local hospital in Thailand with her husband, but the surgery recommended was too expensive. She experiences pain near the site of the mass, and the mass is still growing. Paw sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). She is scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on August 16th, and now she needs to raise $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Paw shared, “I felt embarrassed and very upset when I first noticed that I had this problem. I will feel a lot better after my surgery because I have needed to receive it since I first went to see the doctor in 2019. In the future I want to look after my children and send them to school.”

86%funded
$1,290raised
$210to go

Khaing is a 27-year-old woman from Thailand. She lives with her husband and a three-year-old son in a village in Tak Province. Originally from Karen State, Burma, they moved to their current home three years ago in search of better job opportunities. Her husband is a day laborer and she is homemaker. Ten years ago, Khaing started feeling like her nose was blocked and that she could not breathe well. She also had a runny nose and saw a small mass in her nostril while looking at her reflection in the mirror. At the time, Khaing did not go to see a doctor because she could not afford to pay for treatment, and she thought that she would feel better over time. However, four years ago she noticed that the mass had grown. Khaing went to her local hospital in Burma, where the doctor confirmed she had a mass in her nostril and gave her medication for a week. She did not go back to her follow-up appointment as she had run out of money. She then tried to treat herself with traditional medicine unsuccessfully as the mass continued to increase in size. In the beginning of May 2020, Khaing developed a severe headache and pain in her nose. The area around her nose also became swollen. She went to Mae Tao Clinic for treatment, where the medic found large masses in both of her nasal cavities. She was then taken to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for further investigation. At MSH, she received an x-ray of her nose and the doctor told her that the masses were large and surrounded by a lot of pus. After a CT scan, the doctor diagnosed her with a nasal polyp and scheduled her for surgery on December 28th, 2020. Currently, the area around her nose is swollen and painful. Her nostrils feel itchy, her nose is blocked, and has to breathe through her mouth. She still has a headache, though since she received pain medication from the doctor at MSH, this has been less severe. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 28th, Khaing will undergo an endoscopic sinus surgery. Once recovered, she will be able to breathe normally again and her quality of life will significantly improve. Now, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. Khaing shared, "I really want to have surgery and feel better. I am not scared because I believe that the surgery will help me be free from headaches and breathe well again."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Pamela is wheeled into the consultation room wincing in pain. She briefly smiles but gets back to a serious face. Pamela is a widow whose husband passed away in 1993. After his passing, family conflicts forced her to move from their home village in Migori and settle in a crowded, more run-down neighborhood near Eastleigh. She used to work as a tailor but, after she needed a wheelchair in 2011, she has been unable to work. Pamela lives in a single room tin-roofed house and the local church helps to support her rent. She doesn’t have an ID so it has been hard for her to access local services such as medical support. Pamela told us that she has been relying on well-wishers and their local church for survival and her closest relatives live in Migori and rarely are able to offer her support. Pamela arrived to the hospital with bladder calculus with recurrent UTI that requires an urgent cystolithotomy, a curative laparotomy procedure, to aid relieve her stomach pains that have been recurrent for many years now. According to her neighbors who brought her to the facility, she had been in severe pain the whole night, and the medicine that she received from a nearby dispensary were not helping her. Pamela has been through a lot medically and socially. In late 2011, she suffered from TB of her spine and underwent spinal surgery. She has been using a wheelchair since then. In mid-2017, her stomach pains started and in November 2019, she underwent several tests and was booked for surgery at a hospital. She didn’t have funds so she went back home and continued managing her pains with pain medication. Upon hearing about Watsi's Medical Partner Kijabe Hospital, she came hoping for treatment. On November 7th this year, she was reviewed by the doctors and several tests were done which revealed her condition and need for surgery. She was discharged home and booked for a follow up appointment and possible surgery next week (November 23rd) but because of the pains, she was rushed back to the hospital. Pamela shared with us, “This is my only option to get rid of the pains. I have tried several medications but they are not working. I really need assistance to get this surgery. “

$616raised
Fully funded

Meet Mwanakombo, a six-year-old girl from Kenya. Mwanakombo lives with her parents and is “the firstborn child in a family of three children,” shares our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). “Mwanakombo is now at a school-going age,” AMHF continues. However, Mwanakombo has been unable to pass stool on her own due to an anorectal malformation, and she “often misses school because of discomfort and irritation.” A congenital anorectal malformation is a condition whereby the anal region fails to properly develop in utero. Although cases vary and some patients are born with anal openings smaller than usual, AMHF reports, “Mwanakombo was born without an anal opening.” When she was just one month old, Mwanakombo received a colostomy to allow her to pass stool. However, this procedure is far from sustainable and puts Mwanakombo at risk of exposure to various infections as she continues to grow. In addition, “The colostomy makes it difficult for Mwanakombo to interact with other children freely,” explains AMHF. A two-stage complete anal malformation corrective surgery is required to allow Mwanakombo to pass stool independently. $1,260 will fund the entire procedure. First, she will receive an anorectoplasty to move her bowel to its correct position. Following that procedure, Mwanakombo will undergo a colostomy, which will enable her to pass stool without any assistance. In addition to freeing her from discomfort, this correction will give Mwanakombo independence and confidence. “The treatment will enable Mwanakombo to pass stool normally,” AMHF predicts. “She will be able to go back to school and interact freely with others.” Mwanakombo’s mother shares, “My wish is to see my daughter treated so that she can continue with her schooling. She loves going to school but is finding it difficult to adjust.”

$1,260raised
Fully funded