Aaron EpsteinMONTHLY DONOR
Aaron's Story

Aaron joined Watsi on February 20th, 2015. Six years ago, Aaron joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Aaron's most recent donation traveled 2,600 miles to support Maria Jose, an bright baby girl from Colombia, to fund clubfoot correction surgery to have a full life ahead.

Impact

Aaron has funded healthcare for 86 patients in 14 countries.

All patients funded by Aaron

Periya is a baby boy from Tanzania. He is the youngest in a family of three children. Periya was born at home because the hospital is very far from where they live. His mother had no problems when giving birth, but she was caught by surprise when she saw that her baby's right foot was not normal. At first, she thought that massaging Periya's foot would bring it back to normal, but as time went by, there was still no change. Though her husband did not think it necessary, Periya's mother kept asking relatives where she could get her son treated, and she was eventually directed to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center ALMC-The Plaster House. There, Periya was diagnosed with clubfoot of his right foot. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. This causes difficulty walking and even wearing shoes. However, the treatment he needs is costly for their family. Periya's father sells traditional herbal medicines, while his mother is a homemaker and mostly herds cattle. They are not able to afford the treatment and appeal for financial help. On December 15th, surgeons at our medical partner's care center will perform clubfoot repair surgery on Periya. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $935 to fund Periya's clubfoot repair. After treatment, he will be able to walk more easily and his quality of life will significantly improve. Periya’s mother shared, “I would like for my baby's foot to be straightened so that he can stand and walk properly when the time comes.”

$935raised
Fully funded

Peter is a 46-year-old man from Kiambu County in Kenya. He works mostly in construction sites as a manual laborer. Peter is the second born in a family of eight. He was hit by a motorbike while crossing the road on July 27th, 2020. He was taken to a nearby hospital where an x-ray confirmed he had sustained a fracture of his left femur. An ORIF surgery was recommended but he could not afford the cost of surgery. Peter had been on traction to help treat his fracture since his admission at a government hospital. A recent standoff between the county government and health workers led to a go-slow, which has prompted patients like Peter to seek treatment elsewhere since they cannot access care currently. Peter came to our medical partner's facility and saw the surgeon who again also recommended an ORIF procedure. Peter hopes that he finally has the life-changing surgery that will restore full functionality of his leg and enable him to go back to work. If not treated Peter’s fracture may fail to unite or mal-unite leading to loss of function of his left lower limb. He is not able to personally raise the amount required for surgery given that he is a casual laborer with minimal income.  Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On October 19th, Peter will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. The surgery will allow him to walk with ease and reduce the instance of complications. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,049 to fund this procedure. “I have been in hospital and unable to provide for myself since the accident in July. I hope that the operation will enable me to walk again so that I can fend for myself once more,” Peter said.

$1,049raised
Fully funded

Nay is a 35-year-old woman from Thailand. She lives with her husband in Mae Pa Village in Tak Province. One and half year ago, they moved from Shwegyin Township, Bago Division in Burma for a better job opportunities. Nay stopped working as a day laborer because her health deteriorated. Now, her husband is the only earner and he is also a day laborer making limited income. Around eight months ago, Nay had a high fever and stomachache. She was also vomited a few times so her employer took her to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC). When she arrived, she received an IV as well as oral medications. She was admitted for one day and then she felt better and returned home. Two days later after she got home, she felt stomachache again in the right side and also vomited. Again, her employer took her back to MTC and she was admitted again. She received oral medications as well as an ultrasound test. After an ultrasound, the medic informed her that she has a stone in her common bile duct as well as in the intrahepatic duct. She was then referred to Watsi Medical Partner Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for further investigation. At MSH she received another ultrasound as well as a blood test and an X-ray. She was given oral medications to take home and she was asked to return to the hospital once a month for follow up. She went to MSH several times for follow-up appointments and she kept receiving oral medications for her stomachache problem. On February 11th, she went back to MSH as usual and she received another blood test. After that she was told that she has stone in her common bile duct and she needs to be admitted for surgery to remove the stone. Nay has been advised to undergo a cholecystectomy, the surgical removal of the gallbladder. If left untreated, Nay's symptoms will continue to worsen and put her at risk for further health complications in the future. After seeking treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), Nay is scheduled to undergo her cholecystectomy on March 24th. BCMF is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of Nay's procedure and care. Nay said, “I want to work after my surgery so that our family will have enough income and now I am very sad that because of my condition we may have to borrow money from our neighbor.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded