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Giving for a Greater Good

Compose.io

15 Patients Funded

$1078 Total Donated

16 Members

Mission

We've had a great year of impacting the tech world, so we're taking an opportunity to reach out and impact healthcare around the world this season. Use the Watsi gift card you receive from us to support a patient, and feel free to add your own donation to make a greater impact. We can use this page to track our collective Compose impact.

First, join this team. Then, head to watsi.org/redeem to redeem your gift card and choose a patient to support!

All patients Giving for a Greater Good has funded

Di Par

Di Par is a 14-year-old boy who lives with his mother and three brothers in Burma. He enjoys playing marbles, snapping rubber bands with his younger brothers, listening to music, and visiting with his friends. Di Par enjoys school, but he is only in grade five since his health condition makes it difficult for him to keep up with his classes. Di Par did not present with symptoms until he was five years old. He was easily tired, especially after playing, but his mother did not think it was out of the ordinary and did not seek medical attention for him. When Di Par was 10 years old, the symptoms worsened as he began having difficulty breathing in addition to the fatigue. His mother took him to the clinic where they listened to his heart and detected abnormal heart sounds. He was prescribed medication that seemed to improve his condition, so his mother did not seek further evaluation. In March of 2016, Di Par appeared to go into shock and lost consciousness, and he was brought to the hospital. Although a definitive diagnosis was not made, the physicians thought Di Par might have meningitis and treated him medically. While he was in the hospital, he received a battery of exams: blood tests, urinalysis, CT scan, and X-rays. He also received an echocardiogram, which provided the diagnosis of congestive heart disease — severe tricuspid regurgitation with severe pulmonary stenosis. Di Par was in the hospital for 12 days, and family members helped his mother and brothers pay the hospital costs. Since his hospitalization, Di Par has been experiencing palpitations, fatigue, and difficulty breathing. He is at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in the children’s inpatient department. He is also cyanotic with a bluish tinge to his lips and fingers. After evaluation by the medics at MTC, he was referred to Burma Children Medical Fund for surgical consideration. Di Par and his family have lived in their current village for three months; they moved there to be closer to his mother’s sister and to improve chances for employment. Di Par's father passed away several years ago, so the family's financial support comes from his mother, who sells vegetables and flowers in the market, and his older brother, who works as a day laborer. Despite their hard work, the money they earn does not cover daily expenses, savings, or health care costs. His mother has to borrow money at 10 percent interest to meet those costs and is currently in debt. Di Par’s mother is very concerned about him, as he is falling further and further behind with his studies and, more importantly, his condition is becoming more severe. His mother and older brother alternate caring for Di Par, and his younger brothers help with family chores. This arrangement has not yet affected their work schedules, but Di Par's condition will only complicate the family's needs as further care is needed. For $1,500, Di Par will undergo surgery to replace the damaged heart valve and restore proper blood flow through his heart and lungs. Funding also covers the cost of 12 pre- and post-operative consultations, transportation to and from the hospital, and nine days of hospital care after surgery. Di Par's mother looks forward to a successful operation for her son. "My son enjoys teaching his brothers," she shares, "so when he grows up, he may become a teacher in the village."

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Mesiaki

Mesiaki was born at home on December 28th, 2015. “He is the first born to his young parents who are still living at Mesiaki’s grandparents’ house (father’s side) while slowly trying to build their own house,” says our medical partner in Tanzania, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Mesiaki was born with a condition called spina bifida — a protrusion on his lower back which is growing with time. Although Mesiaki is active and breastfeeding well there is a risk that the protrusion may burst leaking cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), creating bigger health problems. Mesiaki is also at risk of developing hydrocephalus if not treated. “Mesiaki’s mother is very worried about the condition of her son,” AMHF says. “She was unable to bring him to the hospital sooner because they needed a few days to gather enough cash to travel from their village to a hospital where their baby can receive proper treatment. Mesiaki’s parents are small scale farmers; they rely on selling the little that remains after taking out what they need for food.” $1,200 will cover the cost of surgery to treat Mesiaki’s condition, and prevent future complications. After treatment, “The protrusion on Mesiaki’s back will be removed, allowing him to sleep on his back, continue with normal growth, and he will also be out of the risk of developing hydrocephalus.” “God has given us this beautiful baby and we pray that He will see him through his health problem,” Mesiaki’s mother says. “We would love to see him growing up like other children and later on live an independent life.”

100% funded

$1,200raised
Fully funded
Cho Mar

"In the future, we want to return to Burma and open a shop where we will sell dried food," says Cho Mar, a 44-year-old farmer who moved to Thailand with her husband in order to find better work opportunities. "Four years ago, Cho Mar started experiencing heavy bleeding," reports our medical partner, Burma Border Projects (BBP). This was also accompanied by abdominal pains, but after a few months her symptoms subsided so she did not seek any treatment. This past September, however, the same symptoms came back and she also felt a mass in her abdomen. When Cho Mar came to the clinic for an ultrasound, she was diagnosed with a uterine myoma - a non-cancerous growth of fibroids in the uterus caused by abnormal development of muscle cells. If left untreated, these uterine fibroids will continue to grow and cause her severe pain and blood loss. Financing Cho Mar's medical treatment has been very difficult. Cho Mar and her husband do not have ID documentation, so transportation to reach medical treatment has been very expensive. Drivers often over-charge them, and there are several police/immigration checkpoints along the way where they must pay additional fees. Even though Cho Mar's husband works seven days a week on the farm, Cho Mar has been unable to work the past seven months due to her condition. BBP explains, "They have to use their money wisely, because it's just enough to cover their daily expenses. They cannot save or pay for unexpected costs." With $1500, Cho Mar will have a hysterectomy where doctors will surgically remove her uterus and prevent the uterine fibroids from redeveloping in the future. After her surgery, Cho Mar will no longer have pain and discomfort so she can return to work on the farm with her husband. Cho Mar is eager to return home healthy so she can continue working towards her goals. "My dream is to go back to work so that we can start to save money," Cho Mar shares with us.

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Santos

“My son is not growing that well...not as well as the other kids we know that are his age,” shares Santos’ mother. Meet Santos, an 11-month-old infant from Guatemala. Our medical partner, Wuqu’ Kawoq (WK), tells us, “Santos is the younger of two children. His father is a construction worker and his mother works in the house weaving textiles to sell. Santos loves to play with his sister, Shantal. She likes to teach him how to draw and paint.” Santos has acute malnutrition. “Santos is below the average height and the average weight for his age,” WK reports, ”His immune system will weaken, and he will be at increased risk for chronic diseases later in life. He will have limited energy. If his health continues to fall, his family will face an impossible financial burden to get him appropriate medical care.” As a result of food insecurity and marginalization, indigenous Guatemalan villages have the highest rates of stunting in the world. In addition to growth stunting, malnutrition can lead to lower IQ, heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. $512 will fund the treatment Santos’ needs to address his nutritional deficit and improve his low energy and subsequent limited mental potential. This involves micronutrient and food supplementation, deworming medication to rid Miguel of a parasitic infection, and nutrition education for his parents. With these combined efforts, Santos will recoup his weight and height and strengthen his immune system, laying the foundation for a healthier future.

100% funded

$512raised
Fully funded
Kamusiime

“Thank you in advance for your help,” says Kamusiime, a 20-year-old woman from Uganda. After noticing a swelling on her abdomen about two years ago, Kamusiime began to experience severe pain, especially upon lifting heavy objects. She visited a local hospital where she was diagnosed with an umbilical hernia—a condition in which the intestine protrudes through the abdominal muscles at the belly button. Kamusiime is a stay-at-home mother of one and loves playing with little children. Her husband is a part-time nursery school teacher and earns a small income—one that Kamusiime would love to supplement with work on their small plot of land, if it weren't for her medical condition. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), adds, "The piece of land is very small" and is really only large enough to produce food for home consumption. Once diagnosed, surgery was advised but “Kamusiime went to the hospital and was unable to pay for the surgery,” reports AMHF. If she goes untreated for much longer, Kamusiime will be at risk of hernia strangulation and intestinal obstruction. For $220, Kamusiime will receive a hernia repair—an operation that will push the bulge back into place and make her abdominal wall stronger. AMHF predicts that after surgery, “Kamusiime will no longer be experiencing the pain...and she will be able to continue farming and take care of her family.” "I am worried about my wife's health,” shares Kamusiime’s husband. “Thank you for offering to help us. God bless you!”

100% funded

$220raised
Fully funded