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Success! Choranai from Cambodia raised $696 to fund nerve repair surgery so she can use her arm again.

Choranai
100%
  • $696 raised, $0 to go
$696
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Choranai's treatment was fully funded on June 5, 2022.

Photo of Choranai post-operation

June 10, 2022

Choranai underwent nerve repair surgery so she can use her arm again.

Choranai was very lucky she was not more seriously injured and grateful she could have care at Children’s Surgical Centre. The surgeons did a skin graft on her upper arm and a nerve repair for her radial nerve palsy and wrist drop. She was able to return home with a hand splint and has a follow-up planned in a month to see if further nerve repair is necessary. Although it may take up to six months to determine the full success of the nerve repair surgery, Choranai is grateful for the care and hopes to use her right hand again to continue in school and in her favorite activities. Primarily, she wants to finish high school and continue to university to secure a good job in the future.

Choranai’s mother said: “It was very hard on our family and I was so worried about my daughter after she was attacked. She is recovering now, and I am so grateful to the staff and the strangers who helped her so she could have this surgery. She has hope to use her hand and have a good life.”

Choranai was very lucky she was not more seriously injured and grateful she could have care at Children's Surgical Centre. The surgeons did ...

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February 24, 2022

Choranai is a 14-year-old student in tenth grade. She has two siblings, a nine-year-old brother, and a seventeen-year-old sister who is at the university. Her mother works at a local NGO. Her parents have been divorced for seven years and Choranai lives with her mother. When not doing homework, she plays with her brother, watches TV, and listens to music. She also enjoys swimming and helping with housework. She shared that her favorite meal is fried vegetables and milk.

Two weeks ago, she developed a problem in her arm so her mother took her to Angkor Hospital for Children in Siem Reap, where her skin was debrided twice to help her heal. Doctors at the local hospital suggested she visit our medical partner Children’s Surgical Centre (CSC) for further diagnosis and treatment. Surgeons at CSC diagnosed her with radial nerve palsy and need to do a radial nerve repair and rotational flap and skin graft to repair the paralysis in her arm and hand.

On February 24th, she’ll undergo surgery and after recovery, she will be able to feel and use her hand again. Our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, is requesting $696 to fund this procedure.

Choranai and her mom are hopeful that the numbness and paresthesia will disappear and she can use her hand again.

Choranai is a 14-year-old student in tenth grade. She has two siblings, a nine-year-old brother, and a seventeen-year-old sister who is at t...

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Choranai's Timeline

  • February 24, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Choranai was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • February 24, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Choranai received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • February 28, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Choranai's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • June 5, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Choranai's treatment was fully funded.

  • June 10, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Choranai's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 17 donors

Funded by 17 donors

Treatment
Brachial Plexus Injury Surgery
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $696 for Choranai's treatment
Hospital Fees
$87
Medical Staff
$561
Medication
$0
Supplies
$40
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Symptoms of brachial plexus injury (BPI) vary on the severity and location of the injury, but include muscle weakness, loss of sensation, pain, and paralysis. BPI can cause neuropathic pain with damage to the spinal cord and can be long-lasting, with effects such as burning numbness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

The impact of a brachial plexus injury can range in severity; some patients may experience weakness or great pain, others may be paralyzed in their shoulder and upper arm. This can make day-to-day tasks difficult and impair quality of life.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Motorcycle collisions are the most common cause of brachial plexus injury, and are, unfortunately, an exceedingly common occurrence in Cambodia.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Treatment for brachial plexus injury can involve nerve repair, nerve grafting, nerve transfer, or tendon and muscle transfers depending on the location and type of injury, and the amount of time since the injury occurred. A nerve repair involves reattaching a severed nerve; nerve graft is a procedure that takes a healthy nerve from another part of the body and transplants it to the injured nerve to guide regrowth; a nerve transfer is a procedure that cuts a donor nerve and connects it to the injured nerve when there is no functioning nerve stump to attach a graft. Nerve regeneration occurs approximately at a rate of 1 mm/day, and so recovery from a brachial plexus injury can take months for small improvements. Physical therapy during this time is important to prevent stiffness, contractures, or atrophy and increase the chances of regaining good movement in the affected limb.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

While BPI surgery may not restore full movement to a patient, it can greatly increase the patient’s ability to use the affected limb and reduce the pain of the injury.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

BPI surgery is complicated and risks include infection as well as failure to restore movement, which would require further surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Surgery to treat brachial plexus injury can be very complex and not widely performed. Surgical treatment in Cambodia can be expensive and hard to access. Patients will travel for hours by car, motocycle, and bus to receive free surgery at CSC.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Brachial plexus injury can have a range of severity; some patients may be able to be treated by splinting or physical therapy, but serious cases require surgical intervention. These types of injuries do not have alternatives to improving movement and functionality.

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Stephen

Stephen is a young man from Kenya. He is the firstborn in a family of 3 children. Their family has relied on their mother to provide for them as his father passed away when he was young boy. His mother does deliveries for different shop owners around their town. Stephen had to drop out from college do to inability to pay his school fees, and he now helps around the house and helps his mother with the deliveries, which is the how the family makes ends meet. Stephen has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. As a result of his condition, Stephen has been experiencing severe headaches since this past July. He visited a hospital where a CT scan was done that revealed that he had a cyst that was obstructing the normal flow of fluid in and out of the head. An urgent surgery was recommended to remove the cyst, but he did not undergo it due to not having the funds for the procedure. A shunt insertion surgery has been recommended along with a craniotomy that will be performed later to remove the cyst. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $720 to cover the cost of surgery for Stephen that will treat his hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on November 23rd and will drain the excess fluid from Stephen's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve his quality of life. With proper treatment, Stephen will hopefully continue to develop into a strong, healthy man. Stephen says, “I really want to be treated so that I can help my mom provide for us.”

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49%funded
$356raised
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Foster

Foster is a 70-year-old father of nine, from Makwenda Village in Malawi. He lives with his wife and grandchildren. To support his family, he solely depends on farming where he grows maize, groundnuts, and soya beans. Foster is a village headman and he is a member of the Church of African Presbytery. Foster was well until 2020 when he noticed a swelling on the right side of his groin. The swelling was very painful and made passing stool and urine very difficult. The swelling would disappear and reappear after a while, especially when it is cold, and when he coughs or strains himself. Foster decided to seek medical help at a health center in his area where he was referred to Nkhoma Hospital, but at the time surgeries were limited due to the coronavirus pandemic. He was told to come back another time. As the condition persisted, Foster went to seek medical help at Dedza District Hospital where he has been visiting up to now and had been given pain medication. Last week, Foster visited Nkhoma Hospital once again, and he presented that the swelling has now been appearing on both sides. After assessment in the surgical clinic, Foster was diagnosed with Bilateral Inguinal Hernia. The doctor advised that he needs to undergo Hernia Repair surgical procedure and this was scheduled for October 5th. This hernia condition has impacted Foster’s life negatively. Since the condition surfaced, he experiences pain that hinders him from doing his daily activities and he fails to work on his farm. Additionally, he cannot walk a long distance or ride his bike as the swelling appears when he strains himself. Treatment will be a welcome development in Foster’s life. He will be able to work on his farm and continue taking care of his family as he is the sole breadwinner. In addition to that, treatment will prevent Foster from developing complications that a hernia can cause, such as enlargement, incarceration, small bowel obstruction, and strangulation of the hernia, which can be fatal. Foster shared that he does not have enough money to pay for his surgery and other expenses so the medical team referred him to Watsi and our medical partner African Mission healthcare. He has been able to contribute $15 to his care and our medical partner is requesting $500 to cover the cost of Foster's surgery. Foster says, “I was afraid that this condition will start affecting my duties as a village headman, I am thankful that there is hope for me through my donors.”

56% funded

56%funded
$280raised
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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Stephen

Stephen is a young man from Kenya. He is the firstborn in a family of 3 children. Their family has relied on their mother to provide for them as his father passed away when he was young boy. His mother does deliveries for different shop owners around their town. Stephen had to drop out from college do to inability to pay his school fees, and he now helps around the house and helps his mother with the deliveries, which is the how the family makes ends meet. Stephen has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. As a result of his condition, Stephen has been experiencing severe headaches since this past July. He visited a hospital where a CT scan was done that revealed that he had a cyst that was obstructing the normal flow of fluid in and out of the head. An urgent surgery was recommended to remove the cyst, but he did not undergo it due to not having the funds for the procedure. A shunt insertion surgery has been recommended along with a craniotomy that will be performed later to remove the cyst. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $720 to cover the cost of surgery for Stephen that will treat his hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on November 23rd and will drain the excess fluid from Stephen's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve his quality of life. With proper treatment, Stephen will hopefully continue to develop into a strong, healthy man. Stephen says, “I really want to be treated so that I can help my mom provide for us.”

49% funded

49%funded
$356raised
$364to go