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Success! Hear from Cambodia raised $648 to fund a retinal detachment surgery so he can see clearly.

Hear
100%
  • $648 raised, $0 to go
$648
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Hear's treatment was fully funded on March 25, 2021.

Photo of Hear post-operation

March 25, 2021

Hear underwent a retinal detachment surgery so he can see clearly.

Hear had a successful surgery at our Medical Partner CSC and has returned home to his province. He’ll be resting for a couple weeks to make sure the procedure is successful in repairing his retinal detachment. He’s hopeful for the road ahead and relieved that his improved vision allows him to return to his profession as a farmer and support his young family.

Hear had a successful surgery at our Medical Partner CSC and has returned home to his province. He'll be resting for a couple weeks to make ...

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March 4, 2021

Hear is a 28-year-old rice farmer who married with one young child. Hear is the main breadwinner of his family and works hard to support them. In his spare time, Hear likes to read the newspaper and play games with his kid.

Three years ago, the retina of Hear’s left eye detached, causing him partial blindness, and affected his self-esteem due to an inability to see or work.

When Hear learned about our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, he traveled for three and a half hours with his wife seeking treatment. On March 4th, eye surgeons will perform a retinal detachment repair procedure in his left eye. After recovery, he will be able to see clearly. Now, he needs help to fund this $648 procedure.

Hear shared, “I hope after surgery I can see out of my eye again. I need to plant rice and raise animals to support my family. I want to fix my vision so I can work, and can read again without hurting my eyes.”

Hear is a 28-year-old rice farmer who married with one young child. Hear is the main breadwinner of his family and works hard to support the...

Read more

Hear's Timeline

  • March 4, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Hear was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • March 4, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Hear received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • March 4, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Hear's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • March 25, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    Hear's treatment was fully funded.

  • March 25, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Hear's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 12 donors

Funded by 12 donors

Treatment
Retinal Detachment Surgery
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $648 for Hear's treatment
Hospital Fees
$67
Medical Staff
$256
Medication
$0
Supplies
$325
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Symptoms of retinal detachment include floaters in the field of vision, flashes of light when moving the eyes or head, and a curtain over the field of vision. Floaters are specks or globs that appear from clumps of citreous gel breaking down. Other symptoms are the appearance of a curtain-like shadow over the visual field, blurred vision, and reduced peripheral vision.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Retinal detachment is a medical emergency; living with retinal detachment can cause permanent loss of vision.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Surgical eye treatment is not readily accessible in Cambodia. The longer the retina remains detached, the lower the chances are of restoring good vision.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Treatment of retinal detachment involves surgery to reattach the retina. There are three main procedures by which this is done: pneumatic retinopexy, scleral buckling surgery, and vitrectomy. In pneumatic retinopexy, air is injected into the middle of the eyeball, which pushes the detached retina to the wall of the eye. This is followed by cryopexy to repair the tear. Scleral buckling surgery involves a piece of silicone material sewn to the outer layer or the eye, relieving the tugging on the retina. In a vitrectomy, vitreous gel is removed from the eye and air, gas, or silicone gel is injected in to flatten the retina. It may take several months for vision to improve.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery is critical to prevent patients with retinal detachment from going blind.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

One possible risk is that the retina cannot be reattached because of scar tissue; if this occurs, the eye will ultimately become blind. The risk of complications from this surgery is small. These complications include bleeding in the eye, increased eye pressure, swelling inside the eye, clouded lens of the eye, double vision, and infection. There is also a risk of needing further surgery if new breaks form in the retina or scar tissue develops.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Patients in need of retinal detachment may travel from across the country to receive free surgical care at CSC, as alternatives are not available and surgical eye specialists are limited.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Retinal detachment requires surgery as treatment; without surgery, vision will continually deteriorate.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Tablut

Tablut is playful a eight-year-old boy from Burma. In his free time, he enjoys playing football with his friends and hunting with a slingshot in the jungle. He lives with his parents and four sisters in a village near the border in Karen State, Burma. During the day, Tablut and his sisters go to school in the village, while his parents work as agricultural day laborers. They also grow rice for their family to eat, as well as raise chickens and pigs. Together they earn 5,000 baht (approx. 166 USD) per month. The income they earn is just enough to cover their monthly expenses and they cannot afford to pay for other costs that come up including basic health care. On April 26th, Tablut and his friends climbed up a mango tree to pick mangoes, however, Tablut slipped and fell out of the tree, fracturing his right leg. Right away his thigh looked deformed, and he experienced a lot of pain. His friends ran to get his mother who carried him on her back to a nearby clinic where he was admitted for four days. There the medic wrapped his right thigh in a bandage and gave him medication for his pain. While admitted, his pain lessened but his thigh became swollen and he began to develop a fever which caused him extensive pain and an inability to sleep. His mother was told by the medic that they would arrange transportation to take him to a hospital. On April 31st, Tablut and his mother were brought to our medical partner's care center Maharaja Nikon Chiang Mai Hospital (CMH). There, he received an x-ray confirming that his right thigh was fractured. In early May he underwent surgery to place an external fixation device onto his right thigh. Initially, after surgery his pain lessened, however as time has gone on the pain and swelling have returned and he's once again began to develop fevers at night, as well as blisters on his leg where the external fixation device is attached. Currently, he cannot shower by himself, and cannot move his right leg or walk anywhere without the help of his mother. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Tablut will undergo surgery on June 17th to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. After surgery, Tablut's pain will finally subside and he will be able to walk, play, and go back to school to be with his sisters and friends. Our medical partner is asking for $1,500 to fund Tablut's surgery and medical care. His mother said, “Now I am miserable. I want my child to receive surgery quickly so that we can go home. I worry for him and I also worry about my other children who were left behind [at home]. There is flooding in my village, and I am worried that they will go to the river to swim. Thinking about both Tablut and my other children, I can’t sleep at night nor eat. The school will reopen soon, but I have not saved any money for my children’s school fees yet. I want him to go to school when he recovers.”

66% funded

66%funded
$998raised
$502to go
Gedion

Gedion is a happy and talkative 16-year-old from Kenya who is currently a student in standard eight. He is the thirdborn in a family of six. Since their mother left them a few years ago, he and his siblings live with their father in their rural home on a small piece of land. Gedion's father works as a casual laborer and burns charcoal for sale to provide for their family's basic needs, as well as to pay for the children's school fees. His family also plants maize and beans on their small piece of land to feed themselves. During holidays and on the weekends, Gedion and his siblings usually work on other people's farms to provide additional income. He shares that life for his family has been very difficult, but they have been working hard in order to fight poverty together. This past Saturday, Gedion was brought into our medical partner's care center, AIC Kapsowar Hospital, via an ambulance from a facility near his home after being involved in a road traffic accident. While Gedion was on his way home from a nearby shopping center, a tractor passed by. He hopped onto it in order to reach home faster since he was still far from home and it was already beginning to become dark. There were some people already on the tractor, so they continued with their journey together. While they were on their way, the tractor lost control and fell down. The people riding were all rushed to a nearby facility. While those with minor injuries were able to be treated at the local facility, three of the riders, including Gedion, had to be referred to our medical partner's care center. During the accident, he sustained a fracture of his right femur and is currently experiencing a lot of pain. He is also unable to use his leg. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On August 12th, Gedion will undergo a fracture repair procedure, which is called an open reduction and internal fixation. After treatment, he will be able to use his leg again, attend school, and help out at home. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,145 to fund this procedure. Gedion shares, "This state has really pulled me down. I don’t know what to do. Kindly help me so that I may be able to pursue my dreams and change the state of my family.”

12% funded

12%funded
$145raised
$1,000to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Tablut

Tablut is playful a eight-year-old boy from Burma. In his free time, he enjoys playing football with his friends and hunting with a slingshot in the jungle. He lives with his parents and four sisters in a village near the border in Karen State, Burma. During the day, Tablut and his sisters go to school in the village, while his parents work as agricultural day laborers. They also grow rice for their family to eat, as well as raise chickens and pigs. Together they earn 5,000 baht (approx. 166 USD) per month. The income they earn is just enough to cover their monthly expenses and they cannot afford to pay for other costs that come up including basic health care. On April 26th, Tablut and his friends climbed up a mango tree to pick mangoes, however, Tablut slipped and fell out of the tree, fracturing his right leg. Right away his thigh looked deformed, and he experienced a lot of pain. His friends ran to get his mother who carried him on her back to a nearby clinic where he was admitted for four days. There the medic wrapped his right thigh in a bandage and gave him medication for his pain. While admitted, his pain lessened but his thigh became swollen and he began to develop a fever which caused him extensive pain and an inability to sleep. His mother was told by the medic that they would arrange transportation to take him to a hospital. On April 31st, Tablut and his mother were brought to our medical partner's care center Maharaja Nikon Chiang Mai Hospital (CMH). There, he received an x-ray confirming that his right thigh was fractured. In early May he underwent surgery to place an external fixation device onto his right thigh. Initially, after surgery his pain lessened, however as time has gone on the pain and swelling have returned and he's once again began to develop fevers at night, as well as blisters on his leg where the external fixation device is attached. Currently, he cannot shower by himself, and cannot move his right leg or walk anywhere without the help of his mother. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Tablut will undergo surgery on June 17th to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. After surgery, Tablut's pain will finally subside and he will be able to walk, play, and go back to school to be with his sisters and friends. Our medical partner is asking for $1,500 to fund Tablut's surgery and medical care. His mother said, “Now I am miserable. I want my child to receive surgery quickly so that we can go home. I worry for him and I also worry about my other children who were left behind [at home]. There is flooding in my village, and I am worried that they will go to the river to swim. Thinking about both Tablut and my other children, I can’t sleep at night nor eat. The school will reopen soon, but I have not saved any money for my children’s school fees yet. I want him to go to school when he recovers.”

66% funded

66%funded
$998raised
$502to go