Meet another patient

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Success! Savon from Cambodia raised $148 to see clearly again.

Savon
100%
  • $148 raised, $0 to go
$148
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Savon's treatment was fully funded on November 12, 2016.

Photo of Savon post-operation

November 17, 2016

Savon successfully received surgery to see clearly again.

Savon eye pterygium was successfully removed from his left eye and clear vision has been restored. Following the operation, he was given eye drops to reduce inflammation and fight infection. Savon went home after the first surgery and has yet to return to have the same operation completed in the other eye. Because returning to the clinic requires taking a day off from work and usually a family escort, he may have had trouble finding a day to come back. Also, because he left with clear vision in one eye, his problems with blurred vision are less of a burden making the second surgery a less immediate priority than the first. The second surgery will be free whenever Savon returns.

“I am very happy that my eye looks good and feels comfortable,” shares Savon. “I can continue my work on my farm and go places by myself.”

Savon eye pterygium was successfully removed from his left eye and clear vision has been restored. Following the operation, he was given eye...

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October 10, 2016

Savon is a 50-year-old rice farmer from Cambodia. He is married with two sons, four daughters, and four grandchildren. He likes to listen to the social news program on the radio and watch social news and boxing on TV. Savon knew about Children’s Surgical Centre (CSC), a Watsi medical partner, because his nephew had surgery there in the past. He traveled for three hours with his wife to reach CSC for treatment.

Savon developed a pterygium (non-cancerous growth) in each eye about three years ago causing blurred vision, burning, irritation, and tearing. It is difficult for him to see things, do work, and go anywhere outside without feeling uncomfortable.

Eye surgeons at CSC will remove the pterygium in each eye to relieve Savon of his symptoms. $148 will cover the costs of the surgery and care he needs.

Savon says, “I hope my eyes look better and feel more comfortable than now so that I can continue my work in my rice fields and go anywhere more easily than now.”

Savon is a 50-year-old rice farmer from Cambodia. He is married with two sons, four daughters, and four grandchildren. He likes to listen to...

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Savon's Timeline

  • October 10, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Savon was submitted by Lindsay Bownik, Stakeholder Relations Officer at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • October 10, 2016
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Savon received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • October 14, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Savon's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • November 12, 2016
    FULLY FUNDED

    Savon's treatment was fully funded.

  • November 17, 2016
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Savon's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 5 donors

Funded by 5 donors

Treatment
Pterygium
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $148 for Savon's treatment
Hospital Fees
$97
Medical Staff
$50
Medication
$1
Supplies
$0
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A pterygium, a non-cancerous growth of conjunctiva covering the cornea, causes tearing, redness, blurred vision, burning, itchiness, and discomfort.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

When the growth affects the central visual axis, vision will be decreased. The abnormal growth also causes pain and discomfort. Patients usually complain of irritation, light sensitivity, foreign body sensation, and decreased vision.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Pterygium occurrence is much higher among people who live near the equator because of greater exposure to the sun. It is nicknamed "surfer's eye."

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgeons scrape the dysplastic conjunctiva from the cornea surface, removing the affected conjunctiva. They place an autologous conjunctival graft to cover the defect and prevent recurrence.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Surgery cures the symptoms caused by pterygium. Patients experience improved vision and reduced pain and discomfort.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Surgical excision of a pterygium is curative. The procedure is very low risk.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Most patients live with the eye irritation and decreased vision until it starts to affect their daily life. Then, they seek care.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Irritation can be temporarily treated with lubricating drops.

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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Gatguon

Gatguon is an 8-week-old baby girl from a remote area of South Sudan. The civil war in South Sudan has made it difficult for many to access healthcare and treatment, including Gatguon's family. Gatguon was born with swelling in the back of her head. Upon referral to Old Fangak Clinic, the doctor diagnosed Gatguon with spina bifida, a type of neural tube defect in which the spine does not properly close around the spinal cord. Without treatment, Gatguon is at risk of lower-limb paralysis, infection of the exposed nervous tissue, development of tethered cord syndrome, and possible developmental delays. Gatguon urgently needs spina bifida repair surgery to correct the condition and reduce risk of infection. Unfortunately, this treatment is not available for her in South Sudan. Dr Jill Seaman and her team at Old Fangak Clinic facilitated Gatguon’s travel to Kenya – a long and difficult journey for a sick baby. Now, doctors at our medical partner's care center in Kenya will perform the surgery she needs. Gatguon’s parents have two kids. Her mother is a stay-at-home mom and her father is a vegetable farmer. They are hopeful that baby Gatguon will be treated and that they will continue taking care of her and loving her unconditionally. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Gatguon's family raise $1,151 to cover the cost of spina bifida closure surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on April 20th and will hopefully spare Gatguon of further complications and allow her to grow and develop along a healthy trajectory. Gatguon’s mother shared, “We hope that our child will be treated.”

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